Donald Trump

Will GOP Divergence From Trump Over White Supremacist Comments Last?
Fissure unlikely to lead to a larger GOP break from president

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan has often disagreed with some of the things President Donald Trump has said but is expected to continue working with him in the interests of the GOP's legislative agenda. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Each time President Donald Trump makes an inflammatory comment, on the campaign trail or in the White House, it feels like what could be a breaking point for Republicans. But it never is.

With Trump doubling down on his comments effectively defending some white supremacists on Tuesday, could this be it?

Elaine Chao: ‘I Stand By My Man. Both of Them.’
Transportation secretary stays neutral in boss-husband feud

Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao gives her “man” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell a kiss after he introduced her during her confirmation hearing in January. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao weighed in Tuesday on President Donald Trump’s feud with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell using unexpected choice words:

“I stand by my man. Both of them,” she said.

Trump Returning to Rallies After West Wing Shake-Up, Kushner Testimony
 

It’s a busy week at the White House following Friday’s West Wing shake-up with the appointment of Anthony Scaramucci as communications director and the resignation of press secretary Sean Spicer. President Donald Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner is on the Hill on Monday to testify behind closed doors about his meeting with a Russian lawyer during the 2016 campaign, shortly before the president heads back to the campaign trail with a rally in Youngstown, Ohio. See the video for Roll Call White House reporter John T. Bennett’s analysis of the week ahead.

Appropriators Softening Trump's Proposed Fiscal 2018 Cuts
How House and Senate levels agreed upon by leaders compare to Trump's

House Appropriations Chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen, R-N.J., prepares for a hearing in June. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Appropriators are not giving President Donald Trump the degree of overall cuts that he asked for in fiscal 2018 funding. The House passed a package of four titles last week and has cleared the remaining eight through full committee, while the Senate has cleared six titles through full committee. Appropriators are softening Trump’s cuts by more than $50 billion.

Here's a look at how Trump's budget request for the coming fiscal year compares to levels agreed upon by Appropriations leaders in the House and Senate:

Capitol Ink | Exit Scaramucci

Capitol-Ink-08-01-17

The Investigations Trump Can’t Stop
Presidential pardons offer no protection from state prosecutions

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman has spearheaded several investigations into the financial interests of Donald Trump and people close to him. (Courtesy Schneiderman’s office)

President Donald Trump might be able to pardon everyone he wants — possibly even himself. But that would not end his legal troubles.

Trump already fired FBI Director James B. Comey amid an investigation into allegations of collusion between his campaign and Russia. He has attacked Attorney General Jeff Sessions, raising questions about whether he intends to try to remove Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel appointed by the Justice Department to head the Russia probe.

Veterans in Congress Criticize Trump’s Military Transgender Ban
Pushback against policy announcement is bipartisan

Sen. Tammy Duckworth called President Trump’s announcement banning transgender individuals from the military “discriminatory and counterproductive.”  (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Veterans in Congress from across the political spectrum pushed back against President Donald Trump’s announcement banning transgender individuals from serving in the U.S. military.

In a series of tweets Wednesday morning, Trump said that based on the advice of military experts, transgender individuals would no longer be allowed to “serve in any capacity in U.S. Military.” The president cited medical costs and unit disruption as part of his reasoning.