Donna Edwards

Tennessee, Texas Stand Out for Strengthened Hill Sway
In Roll Call’s Clout Index for this Congress, California delegation’s longtime hold on top spot is threatened

Party affiliation and longevity have helped propel members of the Tennessee delegation such as Sen. Bob Corker into positions that convey authority and power, Hawkings writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

No state in this decade has seen a more meaningful boost than Tennessee in institutionalized congressional influence.

Only eight states, all with much bigger delegations because they’re much more populous, have more overt sway at the Capitol this year. That is one of several notable findings from the new Roll Call Clout Index, which the newspaper uses to take a quantifiable measurement of every state’s potential for power at the start of each new Congress.  

Is There Space for a Republican EMILY’s List?
Litmus tests might not work the same way on the right

Alabama’s Martha Roby is one of only 26 Republican women in Congress. Some party members wonder if they need their own version of EMILY’s List to increase that number. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

As recently as the second Reagan administration, Republicans had more women in Congress than Democrats. Then EMILY’s List took hold.

The political action committee, founded in 1984, dedicated itself to electing Democratic women who support abortion rights, becoming an influential force in primaries even when it clashed with the wishes of party leaders. Now, of the 104 women in the 115th Congress, 75 percent are Democrats.

Here’s Whose 2016 Sucked the Most in Washington
From Hillary Clinton to Paul Ryan to Senate Democratic candidates

2016 in a word? Meh. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images file photo)

Democrats Voting on Pelosi Are Older But Not Long-Tenured
A majority of the incoming caucus is 60 or older but most members have served 4 terms or less

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The House Democrats who will decide this week whether it’s time for younger, less-tenured leadership have served in the chamber an average of close to six full terms, and nearly six in 10 are over the age of 60. 

Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi has drawn criticism for not fostering leadership opportunities for younger caucus members. The 76-year-old Californian, who has been the chamber’s top Democrat since 2003, is facing a challenge from 43-year-old Tim Ryan, a seven-term congressman from Ohio, who says that after four straight disappointing elections for House Democrats, it’s time for a change at the top. 

Gubernatorial Losers Descend on Next Congress
Up to six new House Members previously lost a race for governor

Rep.-elect Anthony Brown, who lost a governor’s race in Maryland two years ago, walks down the House steps for the 115th Congress freshman class group photo during the first week of orientation on Nov. 15. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Getting to know your new classmates is always an awkward experience, but a handful of new House members will have at least one thing in common: losing a race for governor.

Two years ago, Democrat Anthony Brown lost the Maryland gubernatorial race to Republican Larry Hogan in an upset, 51 percent to 47 percent. But the former lieutenant governor rebounded to win a competitive Democratic primary this year in Maryland’s 4th District when Rep. Donna Edwards decided to run for the Senate. Brown cruised in the general election and will be coming to Congress next year.

Pelosi Nominates Members for Leadership Positions
Four of seven would be new to leadership

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi has nominated Rep. John Yarmuth, D-Ky., to serve as ranking member of the Budget Committee. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi on Friday nominated seven members for positions in Democratic leadership that will not be finalized until ratified by the Democratic Caucus. 

Pelosi announced the nominations — four of which would be new members of leadership if confirmed by the caucus — in a dear colleague letter. 

New Member: Democrat Anthony Brown Elected in Maryland’s 4th District
Incumbent Rep. Donna Edwards vacated seat for a Senate run

Democrat Anthony Brown won the open seat election for Maryland's 4th Congressional District against Republican challenger George McDermott. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrat Anthony Brown will defeat Republican George McDermott in Maryland's 4th District, The Associated Press projects.

Brown led McDermott 82 percent to 15 percent with 62 percent of precincts reporting.

Van Hollen to Succeed Mikulski in Maryland Senate
Democrat won a tough primary this April against fellow Rep. Donna Edwards

Maryland Senate candidate Rep. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., greets guests after speaking at Leisure World retirement community in Silver Spring, Md., October 13, 2016. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democratic Rep. Chris Van Hollen will succeed Maryland Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, The Associated Press projects. The outspoken and outgoing five-term Democrat announced her retirement last year. 

Van Hollen led Republican challenger Kathy Szeliga 82 percent to 16 percent with 0.5 percent of precincts reporting. 

House Members Have Mixed Record on Higher Office
Thirteen House members and the delegate from Puerto Rico made bids for bigger things

Rep. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., had more than a 10-point lead over incumbent Mark Kirk in a race considered key to the Democrats' bid to gain control of the Senate. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Thirteen House members — and one non-voting delegate from Puerto Rico — gave up their posts to run for statewide office this year, with varying success.

Three of those races, the Maryland, Indiana and Louisiana Senate campaigns, pitted colleagues in the House against each other. While the majority were vying for Senate seats, Democrats John Carney, of Delaware and Pedro Pierluisi, or Puerto Rico, made bids for governor. Here is a round-up of their positions as polls opened on Tuesday.

A Guide to House Leadership, Committee, Caucus Elections
Races will place at least 17 members in new positions of power

The race for chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee will be between Texas Rep. Roger Williams and Ohio Rep. Steve Stivers. (File photos by Bill Clark/Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

While much speculation over House leadership changes in the 115th Congress is focused on a contentious speaker’s election that may never materialize, a long series of intraparty leadership, committee and caucus races guarantee significant turnover in top House posts next year.   

Retirements, term limits and lawmakers departing for other jobs mean that at least 17 prominent roles, and likely more, will change hands. Elections to determine those new influencers are set to begin during the lame-duck session that opens the week after Election Day.