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Rep. Paul Gosar Blames Obama for Siblings’ Attack Ads
Says brothers and sisters’ appearance in opponent’s ads ‘does sting’

Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Ariz., defended himself Monday against four political attack ads in which six of his siblings criticize him. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Paul Gosar blamed former president Barack Obama for the feud with six of his siblings rooted in Gosar’s controversial political style.

After appearing defiant over the weekend and touting his mother’s support for his “philosophy and policies,” the Arizona Republican admitted in an interview with KFYI-AM radio in Phoenix that it “does sting” to be rejected by three of his brothers and three of his sisters in a series of four attack ads released by his Democratic opponent’s campaign.

Former Staffers Want to Fund Diverse Women for Hill Internships
New foundation’s goal is to fund 50 internships a year for young women

Sara Lonardo, left, and Elizabeth Whitney, right, both are former Capitol Hill interns. They teamed up to create the Women's Congressional Staff Foundation. (Photo courtesy Wynne Leahy)

All eyes are on women on Capitol Hill this week: How will those in the Senate vote on Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination? What might his accusers say to affect his confirmation?

Behind the scenes, staffers work to keep the trains moving and their bosses informed. One group doesn’t think there are enough staffers from different backgrounds among them.

Mom Gets in Between Paul Gosar’s Fight With Siblings
Says she is ‘shocked’ six of her children would repudiate Arizona GOP congressman in ads

Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Ariz., defended himself against his brothers and sisters' political attack ads for his opponent. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Paul Gosar’s mother defended him against a political attack ad in which six of her other children repudiated the Arizona GOP congressman for his hardline conservative views and conspiracy theories.

Bernadette Gosar, 85, the mother of 10 Gosar children, told The New York Times she was “shocked” and “crushed” that six of her children would agree to appear in, so far, a series of four advertisements condemning their oldest brother for his political beliefs and rhetoric as he seeks a fifth term in Arizona’s 4th District.

Senate E-Filing Launches New Era in Campaign Disclosures
Advocates for political money transparency praised the move away from snail-mail reports.

With the signing of a spending bill on Friday, Senators and Senate candidates are required to file campaign finance information to the Federal Election Commission electronically. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

It’s been a good week for advocates of faster, and more, political money disclosure.

With President Donald Trump’s signature Friday, it’s official: Senate candidates now must file their campaign finance reports electronically with the Federal Election Commission, making it easier for reporters, voters and opponents alike to sift through donor and spending disclosures.   

Trump Calls Heller a ‘Champion,’ Slams Opponent ‘Wacky Jacky’ Rosen
Nevada Democrat is ‘bought and paid’ by her ‘out-of-state donors,’ he says

President Donald Trump, here at a rally in Montana in July, campaigned in Nevada on Thursday (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images file photo)

Aiming to boost vulnerable Nevada Sen. Dean Heller on his home turf amid a fierce re-election bid, President Donald Trump dubbed the Republican a “champion” of conservative causes and called his Democratic foe “wacky.”

“There’s been no better friend — we started off slow — but I’ve had no better friend in Congress than Dean Heller,” Trump said Thursday at a campaign rally in Las Vegas.

High Court, High Political Drama — Probably for Years to Come
Political Theater, Episode 37

Regardless of the fate of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, the high court figures to be a more prominent, and political, part of American life for the foreseeable future. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In the middle of a singularly rough Supreme Court nomination fight, the business of the high court goes on. The fate of Brett Kavanaugh, President Donald Trump’s second nominee to the court, is still up in the air. But the  direction of the court, regardless of what happens with Kavanaugh, seems to be moving inexorably negative, at least politically, say CQ legal affairs writer Todd Ruger and senior writer Kate Ackley in the latest Political Theater podcast.

 

Court Bucks Chief Justice, Sheds Light on Dark Money Donors
Justices denied stay of lower court ruling requiring donor disclosure

The Supreme Court’s landmark 2010 Citizens United v. FEC decision paved the way for super PACs and other avenues of political money. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Some political groups may no longer be able to hide the identities of their donors after the full Supreme Court on Tuesday reversed a decision by Chief Justice John G. Roberts that had stopped a lower court ruling requiring the disclosures.

The full court, which has eight members at the moment, denied an application for a stay — or delay — of the lower court ruling in a case involving the conservative group Crossroads Grassroots Policy Strategies, which has been fighting since 2012 a lawsuit demanding that it disclose its donors.

Audio Raises Questions About Coordination Between Rosendale, NRA
Gun rights group told Montana GOP Senate candidate about plans for ad buy against Tester

Matt Rosendale, Montana state auditor and Republican candidate for Senate, knew the NRA was going to spend on airtime for advertisements against his opponent, Sen. Jon Tester. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Montana GOP Senate candidate Matt Rosendale knew in advance the National Rifle Association was poised to drop big bucks on an advertising purchase against his opponent this November.

Chris Cox, the NRA’s chief political strategist for its legislative campaign political action committee, told Rosendale the group would be “in this race,” according to audio from a July event in Washington, D.C., reported by the Daily Beast.

New Light on Dark Money Found in Study From Bipartisan Group
Explosion of secret donations to campaigns largely comes from handful of insider groups

Rep. Ted Deutch, D-Fl., and Rep. Peter Welch, D-Vt., hold a news conference to announce efforts to crack down on out-of-control campaign spending. (Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The explosion of so-called “dark money” in political campaigns can be largely traced to spending from 15 groups, according to a study released Wednesday by a non-partisan watchdog group.

The analysis by Issue One is the first attempt to catalog the influential and secretive spending by labor unions, corporations, mega-donors and other special interest groups flooding the American political system in the years since the landmark 2010 Citizens United Supreme Court ruling. Such a task is notoriously difficult because the organizations behind such spending are not legally required to disclose the sources of their money.

Steny Hoyer Touts Oversight and Ethics Standards as Key to Trust in Government
Eyeing majority, Maryland Democrat and minority whip looks at transparency as winning issue

Hoyer layed out proposals to boost transparency, oversight and to strengthen ethics standards. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Efforts to boost transparency, ethics and oversight are among House Minority Whip Steny H. Hoyer’s strategies for restoring Americans’ trust in government if Democrats win the House majority for the next congress.

“Our people believe their government is rigged against them. This belief undermines trust in government and impedes our ability to govern,” the Maryland Democrat told a crowd Wednesday.