Doug Collins

Impeachment news roundup: Jan. 21
Senate blocks every one of Schumer’s amendments on rules proposal

House impeachment managers address the media in the Capitol on the Senate trial of President Donald Trump on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate voted 53-47 along party lines to approve Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s rules for the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump, after a long night of debate that stretched to nearly 2 a.m. Wednesday morning.

Senators almost entirely along party lines to block every motion Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer put forward Tuesday in an attempt to subpoena testimony from Cabinet officials, State Department and White House documents, and communications regarding Ukraine.

To rein in Big Pharma over high drug prices, start with patent reform
Bipartisan proposals represent a rare bright spot in a divided Congress

Abuse of the patent system by brand-name drug manufacturers is exacerbating the financial burden faced by American patients for their prescription drugs, Lane writes. (George Frey/Getty Images file photo)

OPINION — With the Senate impeachment trial kicking off and partisan tensions running high on several fronts, Americans might be forgiven for thinking that Congress has lost the ability to find common ground. But lately, and despite the proverbial odds, there is a new bipartisan consensus forming on an issue of incredible importance to millions of Americans: prescription drug pricing. Specifically, reforming the U.S. patent system to end abusive practices that are directly contributing to high drug prices.

Across the country, Americans are struggling under the weight of skyrocketing prescription drug costs. It is no secret that affording medicines and treatments is an incredible burden for too many families. On average, Americans are paying considerably more than citizens of other high-income countries for the same exact prescription drugs.

Impeachment news roundup: Jan. 9
Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told senators at a GOP lunch to keep their schedules flexible for the end of next week

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., speaks to reporters during her weekly news conference on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Republican senators were told by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell at a lunch Thursday to keep their schedules flexible for the end of next week, when they are supposed to leave Washington for a weeklong break that includes the MLK Day holiday on January 20.

According to an attendee, McConnell said that with the possibility that Speaker Nancy Pelosi could soon send over the impeachment articles, senators should be prepared to be at the Capitol for Saturday sessions starting Jan. 18.

34 images that defined 2019 in Congress: Photos of the Year
A busy year as captured by CQ Roll Call’s photojournalists

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We asked each of our three photojournalists to select their favorite photographs from 2019. Below is their unique view of political news events in Washington, as well as daily life on and around Capitol Hill.

After a busy week, Congress is ready for the holidays: Congressional Hits and Misses
Week of Dec. 16, 2019

Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney speaks with reporters as she passes the holiday sign in the basement of the Capitol as she leaves the House Democrats caucus meeting on Dec. 17. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Congressional Hits and Misses: Impeachment edition
The House voted Wednesday to adopt two articles, setting up expected Senate trial

People rally in support of the impeachment of President Donald Trump on Wednesday, the conclusion of proceedings in the House. The next step will be a trial in the Senate. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Impeachment news roundup: Dec. 18
House ends historic impeachment debate, majority votes to impeach Trump

House Majority Whip James Clyburn, D-S.C., is seen in the Capitol’s Statuary Hall during procedural votes on the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump on Wednesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House shortly before noon began debate on the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump and Democratic leaders said they were on track to vote on them this evening.

While Republicans moved to adjourn the House shortly after it convened and introduced another resolution condemning the Democratic committee chairmen who led the impeachment inquiry, Majority Leader Steny Hoyer told reporters that the House will definitely complete debate and vote on impeachment today.

House to hold separate votes on Trump impeachment articles
Rules Committee finalizes procedure for Wednesday after contentious hearing spanning more than 10 hours

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., called on her Democratic Caucus to join her on the floor on Wednesday before the House begins debate on the impeachment articles against President Donald Trump on Wednesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

The full House will debate and vote separately on two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump on Wednesday, under a process set up by the House Rules Committee on Tuesday night after a contentious hearing that spanned more than 10 hours.

The Rules panel adopted a closed rule in a 9-4 party-line vote just after 9 p.m., which means no amendments to the articles will be considered on the House floor.

Impeachment news roundup: Dec. 17
House Republicans put up united front ahead of impeachment vote

Maryland Democratic Rep. Jamie Raskin, right, a House Judiciary Committee member, confers with counsel Barry Berke during the House Rules Committee markup of articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump on Dec. 17. Judiciary Committee ranking member Doug Collins, R-Ga., is at left. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Republicans huddled Tuesday evening for their weekly conference meeting and emerged with confidence that their party will remain united in opposing the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump that Democrats are bringing to the floor Wednesday.

“Have you not seen us united? Have you not witnessed us united?” House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said when a reporter asked if he was confident Republicans will unanimously oppose the articles. “The reason why I know we’ll stay united is because the facts are on our side ... the process has been failed, [Democrats] picked a timeline and they stuck to their timeline without having any facts for it.”

Impeachment? Yawn. Next.
Attitudes about President Donald Trump are already baked in

Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., yawns as ranking member Doug Collins, R-Ga., speaks during the House Judiciary Committee markup of articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. Impeachment is not likely to change too much about political dynamics. Most attitudes about Trump are already baked in, Stuart Rothenberg writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

OPINION — Brad Parscale, President Donald Trump’s 2020 campaign manager, staked out his position on the impact of impeachment when he tweeted in early December, “Nancy Pelosi is marching members of her caucus off the plank and into the abyss,” adding, “Impeachment is killing her freshman members and polling proves it.”

Yawn.