Doug Collins

House gets its say as Supreme Court takes up census citizenship question
Stakes are high as decision could affect how many House seats each state gets

The House general counsel gets 10 minutes to speak to the justices Tuesday on why Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross cannot add the citizenship question to the 2020 census. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House gets a relatively rare chance to directly address the Supreme Court on Tuesday in a legal showdown about whether the Trump administration can add a citizenship question to the 2020 census.

The case is one of the most significant for members of Congress during the current Supreme Court term. The census results determine how many House seats each state gets and affect how states redraw congressional districts. The results are also used to distribute billions of dollars from federal programs that are based on population count to state and local governments.

Chairman Nadler subpoenas fully unredacted Mueller report
DOJ calls New York Democrat’s request ‘premature and unnecessary’

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., is seeking to obtain the full, unredacted report by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 5:26 p.m. | House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler issued a subpoena Friday demanding Attorney General William Barr release a full, unredacted version of the report authored by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III.

“My committee needs and is entitled to the full version of the report and the underlying evidence with past practice. The redactions appear to be significant,” Nadler wrote in a statement released Friday.

House Democrats press on with investigations after Mueller report release
They’re dissatisfied with how much information was redacted from special counsel’s report

Rep. Adam B. Schiff, chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, still wants “comprehensive testimony from Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller’s Russia investigation. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump might be claiming vindication with the release of special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s Russia report, but House Democrats are moving forward with their investigations of him and people in his orbit.

Democrats quickly expressed their dissatisfaction with how much information Attorney General William Barr redacted from the report released Thursday.

Nadler to subpoena the unredacted Mueller report and underlying materials
Judiciary chairman says contrary to public reports he has not heard that DOJ plans to provide a less-redacted version

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., said he will issue a subpoena for the full, unredacted version of the Mueller report and the underlying investigatory materials. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler is officially issuing a subpoena to obtain the full, unredacted report authored by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III, and the underlying materials used in his investigation.

Just a few hours after the Department of Justice released a redacted version of Mueller’s report to Congress and the public, Nadler said he will issue a subpoena for the full report and investigatory materials. The Judiciary Committee had voted to authorize him to do so earlier this month, and the chairman had said he would if the Department of Justice declined to willingly provide the full report to Congress.

When a hate crimes hearing goes very wrong, something’s not right in America
Casting a shadow on the hearing, as he does on everything, was the president

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, left, and ranking member Doug Collins both condemned white nationalism Tuesday. But the hearing quickly devolved into a shameful spectacle, Curtis writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — When people are being threatened, intimidated and murdered, you would think that partisan bickering would take a back seat. But this is the U.S. Congress we’re talking about. Instead, what was supposed to be an examination of white nationalism and the rise of hate crimes on Tuesday devolved into what Americans have wearily begun to expect from their elected representatives. The House Judiciary Committee members inhabited different parties and different planets.

When what’s at stake is this serious, that’s pretty frightening.

Democrats blast Trump at Judiciary hearing for ‘emboldening’ white nationalists
‘Some hateful ideological rhetoric that originates in the United States is now used to inspire terror worldwide,’ Nadler says

Chairman Jerrold Nadler, left, and ranking member Doug Collins  both condemned white nationalism and the rise in hate crimes in the U.S. in recent years. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee criticized President Donald Trump on Tuesday of using rhetoric that has encouraged the spread of white nationalism and hate crimes.

“As the New Zealand attack showed, some hateful ideological rhetoric that originates in the United States is now used to inspire terror worldwide,” Chairman Jerrold Nadler said at a hearing on the rise of hate crimes and white nationalism in the U.S. in recent years.

House to probe rise in hate crimes since Trump was elected
Looking into rising hate crimes is a priority for House Judiciary Chairman Nadler

Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., left, and ranking member Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., conduct a House Judiciary Committee markup in Rayburn Building on a resolution to authorize the issuance of subpoenas to obtain the full Robert Mueller report on Wednesday, April 3, 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House Judiciary Committee will look into rising rates of hate crimes and white nationalism in the U.S. at a hearing on Tuesday, April 9.

After the midterm elections last year, Rep. Jerrold Nadler, the chairman of the committee who was then the ranking member, promised to hold hearings in the new Congress on the rise of racially and religiously motivated violence.

House Democrats authorize subpoena for full Mueller report
Chairman Nadler plans to keep subpoenas in back pocket unless AG Barr refuses to cooperate

Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., received authorization from the House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday to subpoena the full Mueller report. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Judiciary Committee authorized Chairman Jerrold Nadler on Wednesday to subpoena the full Mueller report and its underlying evidence, directly confronting Attorney General William Barr, who has indicated he intends to withhold some information from Congress.

The resolution passed by a party-line 24-17 vote in the committee Wednesday also authorized Nadler to subpoena five Trump officials who no longer serve in the White House: former White House Counsel Don McGahn; former chief political strategist Steve Bannon; former White House communications director Hope Hicks; former chief of staff Reince Priebus; and former White House lawyer Ann Donaldson.

Subpoenas won’t spell quick end to Mueller report fight
House Democrats don’t have a way to quickly enforce executive branch compliance

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler gave the attorney general a deadline of Tuesday to send Congress the full Mueller report. They’re still waiting. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

If Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee authorize congressional subpoenas Wednesday for the full special counsel report and underlying evidence, it won’t immediately start a legal showdown between the legislative and executive branches.

But the resolution would give Chairman Jerrold Nadler the discretion to throw the first punch, even as the terms of that looming separation of powers fight remain unsettled.

The Papadopoulos Tapes: Long live LinkedIn!

George Papadopoulos is a big fan of LinkedIn. (Noam Galai/Getty Images file photo)

Oh, the things you learn from reading the transcript of House investigators’ interview with George Papadopoulos, the former campaign aide for President Donald Trump who spent time in federal prison for making false statements to the FBI. 

The House Judiciary and Oversight and Government Reform committees interviewed Papadopoulos on Oct. 25, 2018, and current Judiciary ranking member Doug Collins released the transcript of the interview this week. It’s kind of fun, amid the serious legal and ethical issues that we at HoH are happy to hand off to someone else.