DSCC

After Alabama, How Optimistic Should Democrats Be for 2018?
The special election may have been unique, but strategists see important lessons

Supporters of Alabama Democrat Doug Jones celebrate his victory over Judge Roy Moore at the Sheraton in Birmingham, Ala., on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Within minutes of Doug Jones’ victory Tuesday night, they started coming in — a flood of fundraising emails from other Democrats around the country, many running in red territory.

“Next up, Texas,” read the subject line for a fundraising email from Democratic Rep. Beto O’Rourke, who’s hoping to topple Texas GOP Sen. Ted Cruz next year.

Moore Relied Heavily On Fundraising Outside Alabama During Final Campaign Stretch
Most large-dollar donations were from outside state in October and November

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The Republican candidate for Alabama’s Senate seat, Roy Moore, raised three times more in big-dollar donations from donors outside his state than from those within Alabama, according to newly released Federal Election Commission data that covers Oct. 1 through Nov. 22

Moore, the former chief judge of the Alabama Supreme Court, raised nearly $680,000 in itemized donations from outside of Alabama during that time, and only $172,000 from donations within the state.

National Democrats Still Wary of Getting Involved in Alabama Senate Race

A campaign worker for Roy Moore collects campaign signs after the U.S. Senate candidate forum held by the Shelby County Republican Party in Pelham, Ala., on Aug. 4. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer said Monday the Senate Democratic campaign arm has no intention of getting involved in the Alabama Senate race unless asked — even though the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee has been blasting out fundraising emails centered on the contest. 

“It’s an Alabama race. They’re running it,” the New York Democrat said when asked whether national Democrats would get more involved in helping Democratic candidate Doug Jones now that Republican candidate Roy Moore seems to be suffering in the polls amid allegations that he had sexual contact with minors when he was in his 30s.

Senate Majority PAC Announces New Senior Staff
Group is focused on backing Senate Democrats

J.B. Poersch, president of the Senate Majority PAC, is welcoming several new senior staffers to his group. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

The super PAC dedicated to helping Democrats win back the Senate is announcing several new senior staffers for the 2018 cycle, according to an announcement shared first with Roll Call.

J.B. Poersch, president and co-founder of the Senate Majority PAC, said in a statement that the group had assembled a “first-rate team” in the face of a “challenging Senate map.” Senate Democrats are defending 25 seats next year compared to the Republicans’ eight.

Van Hollen Confident Dems Will Invest in Alabama Special Election
'We have a terrific candidate' in Doug Jones, Maryland senator says

Sen. Chris Van Hollen, the chairman of the DSCC, said he thinks Doug Jones will energize voters to turn out, but “I’m not sure, after a bitter Republican primary, that’s going to be the case on the Republican side.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Chris Van Hollen believes Democrats will invest in their candidate in the Alabama special election to fill the remaining term of former Sen. Jeff Sessions, President Donald Trump’s attorney general.

And as the chairman of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, which will fight to retain current and capture new Senate seats in 2018, Van Hollen’s word carries considerable weight.

Democrats Hope for ‘Perfect Storm’ in Alabama Senate Race
Doug Jones touted as party’s strongest candidate in years

Doug Jones chats with attendees before a Democratic Senate candidate forum in Decatur, Ala., on Aug. 3. (Jeronimo Nisa/The Decatur Daily via AP, File Photo)

As Republicans gear up for a grueling primary runoff in the Alabama special election Senate race, Democratic candidate Doug Jones has the race to himself. And Democrats see Jones as their best hope for victory in a ruby-red state.

But that’s a tall order for Jones.

Sinema ‘Seriously Considering’ Challenging Flake in Senate
Arizona congresswoman under pressure to make a decision

Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., is considering running for Senate. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democratic Rep. Kyrsten Sinema is “seriously considering” challenging GOP Sen. Jeff Flake in the Arizona Senate race, she said after a local news outlet reported that she is planning to run.

Flake is considered one of the two more vulnerable GOP incumbents in 2018, and Sinema is also facing pressure to make a decision, with the prospect of a Democratic primary for the race. 

Wasserman Schultz Defends Keeping Fired IT Worker
‘I believe that I did the right thing, and I would do it again,’ Florida congresswoman says

Florida Democratic Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz said she believes fired IT worker Imran Awan is getting additional scrutiny because he is Muslim. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Florida Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz defended keeping a fired IT worker on her payroll despite the fact he was banned from the House network and fired by another member of Congress. 

Wasserman Schultz said it would have been easier to fire Imran Awan.

Health Care Ads Running This Recess
Outside groups keep up the pressure on air and online

Nevada Sen. Dean Heller will continue to be the target of health care-related ads during recess. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee is launching geo-targeted and candidate-specific Google search and display ads on the Republican health care bill over the July Fourth recess as part of an ongoing six-figure digital ad buy.

The holiday recess isn’t a typical time for expensive TV buys since many families go away or are spending time outdoors. But plenty of groups will be advertising over the congressional recess — mostly online, but some on TV — on the GOP health care proposal ahead of anticipated Senate action when Congress returns July 10. 

Defending Against a Cyberattack on Democracy
Campaigns and operatives taking prevention into their own hands

A woman with her daughter casts her vote in North Las Vegas, Nevada, on Election Day last fall. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Congressional campaigns rocked by Russian interference in the 2016 elections are trying to make sure that it never happens again.

Campaigns and elections are top targets for future cyberattacks. So campaign committees and campaigns themselves are taking steps to bolster security staff and training.