Ed Royce

California GOP Incumbents Will Make Democrats’ Challenge Expensive
Democrats hope to flip nine of 14 Republican-held seats in 2018

Rep. Ed Royce is one of several California GOP incumbents gearing up for expensive re-election fights. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

National Democrats hope disapproval of President Donald Trump will help flip nine of California’s 14 Republican-held congressional seats, but campaign finance reports show Republican incumbents will make it expensive for them.

Six of them raised at least $750,000 during the first half of 2017, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. While Democratic challengers have raised less so far, they’ll get help from the party and outside groups past the primaries.

Obama Alumni Jump Into Congressional Races Across the Country
Many motivated by Trump’s election and desire to move ex-boss’ policies forward

Democrat Sam Jammal is challenging California Rep. Ed Royce in the 39th District. (Sam Jammal for Congress Facebook page)

Alumni of the Obama administration are heeding their former boss’ call to get in the game themselves and run for office in response the election of President Donald Trump and to continue what the former president started.

Sam Jammal, an Obama appointee in the Commerce Department who is running in California’s 39th District against Republican Rep. Ed Royce, said he was heeding those words.

At the Races: Royce Challenger Gives Himself $2 Million Head Start
First woman Marine combat pilot challenges Barr in Kentucky; former Obama ambassador running in Colorado

California insurance executive Andy Thorburn kicked off his challenge to Republican Rep. Ed Royce with a $2 million loan to his campaign. (Andy Thorburn for Congress)

A new Democratic challenger to California Republican Rep. Ed Royce is kicking off his candidacy by pumping $2 million into his campaign and an ad with him being sent to jail.

Insurance executive Andy Thorburn released a video Tuesday announcing he would challenge Royce and that he is willing to use his personal wealth to back up his campaign. Thorburn told the Los Angeles Times that he had deferred running for office because of the difficulty of balancing campaigning and running his business, but the election of President Donald Trump changed that.

Russia Sanctions Bill Still Not a Done Deal
Corker says Senate likely to remove North Korea provisions in House-passed version

Sen. Bob Corker anticipates the Senate will remove North Korea language from a House-passed sanctions bill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Updated: 11:38 a.m. | The question of when Congress will strengthen sanctions against Russia remains unclear.

The House overwhelmingly passed a package Tuesday that includes new sanctions against Russia, Iran and North Korea, sending the measure to the Senate ahead of the August recess. Only three members of the House voted against the combined bill.

House Tees up Sanctions Bill, but Senate Path Uncertain
House to consider imposing sanctions on Iran, Russia, North Korea

House Minority Whip Steny H. Hoyer predicts his chamber will pass a sanctions bill that has been held up. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

A bill that aims to impose sanctions on Iran, Russia and North Korea is up for a vote on the House floor Tuesday and leadership involved in negotiating terms of the legislation expect it to pass with little fanfare. But the measure would still need to clear the Senate, and it is unclear what the timetable is there for consideration.

House Minority Whip Steny H. Hoyer said Tuesday that among the bipartisan compromises that were reached is a provision that would allow all members of the House to bring forth resolutions of disapproval should the president decide to withdraw sanctions on the three countries.

App Challenge Brings Congress, Young Coders Closer
162 members now sponsor district winners in annual competition

Melissa Medina, left, and Arkansas Rep. Bruce Westerman listen to a student demo her winning app in the 2016 Congressional App Challenge. (Courtesy Melissa Medina)

The third annual Congressional App Challenge, in which members feature their young constituents’ entrepreneurial work in the technology field, launches Wednesday.

Student coders have until Nov. 1 to submit entries to their participating members of Congress. 

House Floor Will be Busy Next Week
Still no plans to delay start of summer recess afterward

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., said to expect late night votes on the “minibus” appropriations package next week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House plans on being plenty busy next week before the beginning of its late summer recess, with late-night votes expected on a “minibus” appropriations package of four spending bills but no word yet on whether it might consider a contentious budget resolution or a package of sanctions on Russia, Iran and possibly North Korea. 

During their Thursday colloquy on the House floor, Minority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., asked Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., to explain the process under which the consolidated “minibus” appropriations bill would be considered.

Barbara Lee to Take AUMF Repeal to Foreign Affairs
GOP leadership drop language from spending bill

Rep. Barbara Lee on Wednesday vowed to take her long-time efforts to repeal the current Authorization for Use of Military Force, which dates to 2001 but is used for a wide range of conflicts now, to the House Foreign Affairs Committee after Republican leaders removed it from a spending bill the California Democrat successfully attached the repeal to.

Take Five: Jimmy Gomez
California Democrat reflects on his first week in Congress

California Rep. Jimmy Gomez previously worked on the Hill for Rep. Hilda L. Solis and recalls telling himself he wouldn’t return to Washington until he was a member of Congress. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Freshman Rep. Jimmy Gomez, 42, a California Democrat, talks about the time between his being elected and being sworn in, returning as a former Hill staffer, and his welcome to Washington compared to Montana Rep. Greg Gianforte’s.

Q: What has surprised you about Congress so far?

At the Races: Democrats Announce for Wide Swath of Congressional Races

Angie Craig, the Democratic Farmer Labor candidate in Minnesota's 2nd District in 2016, announced on Monday she's running again. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Democrats continued to announce their intentions for several congressional races on Monday, which ranged from tossup match-ups to crowded primary races to nearly hopeless cases in heavily Republican states. 

Angie Craig lost last year’s open-seat race in Minnesota’s 2nd District by less than 2 points. On Monday, the Democratic-Farmer-Labor candidate announced she’d try to unseat last year’s rival, freshman GOP Rep. Jason Lewis.