Elections

Rob Bishop Discounts Prospect of Senate Run
Utah Republican chairs House Natural Resources Committee

Rep. Rob Bishop, R-Utah, is not interested in running for Senate. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

If Sen. Orrin G. Hatch decides not to run for an eighth term, at least one Utah congressman is not likely to run for his Senate seat.

Rep. Rob Bishop said in an interview with C-SPAN’s Newsmakers airing Sunday that he would rather stay in the House. The Utah Republican was first elected to the House in 2002 and chairs the House Natural Resources Committee.

Chaffetz Recovering from Surgery
Says he’ll ‘absolutely’ be back

Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, had surgery to remove screws and a metal plate from his foot that he broke 12 years ago. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Jason Chaffetz underwent successful foot surgery at the University of Utah and is now recovering.

Chaffetz had previously said he was having surgery to remove screws and a metal plate doctors installed 12 years ago after he broke his foot in a fall while working in his garage.

Analysis: Democrats Try to Force Republicans’ Hands — but Can They?
Republicans still have the edge in political maneuvering

Democrats are hoping to force the Republicans’ hand through legislation from Massachusetts Rep. Katherine M. Clark. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats want to force Republicans’ hands on President Donald Trump’s tax returns — but it remains to be see how effective posturing can be for the minority party.

Democrats in the chamber plan to have Massachusetts Rep. Katherine M. Clark introduce legislation requiring Trump to release his tax returns from 2007 to 2016, according to The Washington Post. 

Collin Peterson Running for Re-Election Next Year
In neighboring Minnesota 8th District, Rick Nolan is still unsure

Rep. Collin C. Peterson, right, says he’s running for re-election in 2018 while fellow Minnesota Rep. Rick Nolan is still contemplating a gubernatorial run. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Democrat whose potential retirement gives his party the most heartburn every year, Minnesota Rep. Collin C. Peterson, is running for re-election next year.

“Yeah, I'm running. I’ve got 700 grand in the bank,” Peterson said outside the House chamber Wednesday afternoon.

Chaffetz Will Miss 3 to 4 Weeks After Surgery
Stems from surgery on broken foot 12 years ago

Rep. Jason Chaffetz will undergo foot surgery and said it will put him out of commission for three to four weeks. (Jason Chaffetz/Instagram)

Outgoing Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz announced Wednesday that he would be undergoing foot surgery that will lead to him missing three to four weeks of congressional activity.

Chaffetz posted an X-ray image of his foot on on Instagram, explaining he had broken his foot 12 years ago and it took 14 screws and a metal plate to repair it. 

The Important Connection Between Governors and Congress
A first look at the gubernatorial race ratings for 2017-18

South Dakota Rep. Krisit Noem is a candidate for governor in 2018 and leaves behind a safe Republican seat. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In Washington, it’s easy to ignore governors as distant rulers over far away lands. But now is a good time to start paying attention to what’s happening in state races.

Voters in 38 states (including nine of the 10 most populated) will elect a governor over the next two years, and the results have a direct connection to Capitol Hill. The large number of races give aspiring (or weary) members an opportunity to leave the House, and consequently, leave behind potentially vulnerable open seats. And governors in 28 of those states will have a role (specifically veto power) in the next round of redistricting, which will impact what party controls the House in the next decade. 

Opinion: The Obama Effect — Pros and Cons for Republicans and Democrats
Former president could unite a party in distress

Former President Barack Obama’s influence could unite a Democratic Party that showed togetherness after President Donald Trump’s win but is already breaking apart on issues such as abortion rights, Mary C. Curtis writes. (Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call)

Barack Obama, the charismatic former president, can cause a scene just by walking into a coffee shop, as the rapturous crowds in usually blase New York City demonstrated at one of his cameos. So as he gently re-entered the public and policy eye this week, it’s no surprise that he could throw both Democrats and Republicans off balance — though of course for very different reasons.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell gave President Donald Trump possibly his most important first-100-day achievement by spearheading the maneuver to transform Obama’s Supreme Court pick to replace Antonin Scalia into the conservative Neil Gorsuch, whose first significant vote allowed an Arkansas execution to proceed. McConnell’s obstruction and subsequent “nuclear option” may have played a part in breaking the democratic process, but isn’t that a small price to pay for a win —  at least I’m sure the president feels that way.

Jim Jordan for Oversight Chairman? ‘We’ll See’
Former Freedom Caucus chairman leaves open bid for Chaffetz gavel

Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan, center, is the highest ranking Freedom Caucus member on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Ohio Republican Rep. Jim Jordan signaled Wednesday he might be interested in leading the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee should current Chairman Jason Chaffetz decide to leave Congress early, as has been speculated since the Utah Republican announced he would not run for re-election in 2018.

“We’ll see if and when that happens,” Jordan said when asked if he would vie for the gavel.

Senate Republicans Became More Bipartisan in the Last Congress — Democrats, Not So Much
Report places Sen. Bernie Sanders as the least bipartisan senator

Sens. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Susan Collins, R-Maine, talk before a committee hearing. Collins was identified in a report as the most bipartisan senator of the 114th Congress. The report ranked Warren 88th. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Democrats, once happy to rail against what they called obstructionist Republicans in the chamber, flipped positions with their friends across the aisle when it came to partisanship in the 114th Congress.

A new report from the Lugar Center and Georgetown University shows that most senators — almost two-thirds of the chamber — acted more bipartisan when it came to cosponsorships on bills during the most recent Congress, compared to the Congress before.

Luther Strange Gets First Primary Challenger
Suspended state Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore enters Alabama Senate race

Sen. Luther Strange, R-Ala., will face a primary challenge from the state's suspended Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Roy Moore, the suspended Alabama Supreme Court chief justice, announced Wednesday that he’ll challenge Alabama Sen. Luther Strange in the Republican primary next year.

Moore, who was suspended in 2016 for telling probate judges not to follow federal orders on same-sex marriage, had previously been interviewed to replace Sen. Jeff Sessions after Sessions became U.S attorney general, but now-former Gov. Robert Bentley appointed Strange, the former state attorney general, to the seat, AL.com reported.