Elections

Ratings Change: Flake More Vulnerable in Arizona
Ongoing feud with Trump complicates GOP senator’s re-election bid

Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake is drawing heat from both sides as he seeks a second term next year. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The acrimony between President Donald Trump and Arizona Republican Jeff Flake, which is already making the senator’s re-election bid more challenging, should only intensify during the president’s rally in Phoenix on Tuesday night. 

Flake is known as a Trump opponent, which could make him vulnerable in the primary. The feud appeared to start in a private meeting a year ago, but has since escalated. Earlier this summer, Flake published a book, titled “Conscience of a Conservative,” publicly criticizing the Republican Party for the rise of Trump. 

There’s a Good Reason Trump Will Rally Supporters in Phoenix
President will find crowd hungry for his red meat rhetoric, and he could use a boost after a rough few weeks

Then-presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to a crowd of supporters during a campaign rally in June 2016 in Phoenix, Arizona. Trump campaigned seven times in Arizona before Election Day last year. (Ralph Freso/Getty Images file photo)

On Monday, President Donald Trump gave a somber address about his strategy in America’s longest-running war in Afghanistan. But that tone will likely change as the president holds a campaign-style rally tonight in Phoenix — where Trump has tossed out some of his more visceral rhetoric — and feed supporters samples of what made them love him in the first place.

It could be a pep rally for Trump after the criticism he got last week from many Republicans for the way he appeared to give a nod to white supremacists after the racial violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, disarray in the White House that has led resignations and firings in the top tier in his team, and no major legislative accomplishments to show for his seven months in office.

Flake Brushes off Trump’s Criticism as President Lands in His Backyard
Trump often critical of Arizona senator, who faces tough re-election challenge from both sides

en. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., is trying not to sweat President Donald Trump's criticisms of him. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Despite Donald Trump’s disparaging comments about him, Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake said he isn’t sweating the president’s visit to Phoenix on Tuesday. 

“I don’t worry about it at all,” Flake said at an event Monday in the Phoenix suburbs, the Los Angeles Times reported.

Judge Gives Gianforte Until Sept. 15 to Have Mugshot Taken
Democrats can’t wait to see it

Rep. Greg Gianforte, R-Mont., pled guilty to assaulting a reporter on the eve of his special election win. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A judge ordered that Montana Rep. Greg Gianforte be fingerprinted and photographed by Sept. 15 in relation to his assault of a journalist earlier this year. 

Judge Rick West ordered that the Republican report to a jail in Bozeman to be booked for his assault charge, The Associated Press reported.

Analysis: Why Recent Tax Overhaul Efforts Failed and This One May, Too
Republicans taking tax message on the road this week without details

Four years ago, former House Ways and Means Chairman Dave Camp and former Senate Finance Chairman Max Baucus speak with Mrs. G TV and Appliances president Debbie Schaeffer and Marguerite Mount, the store’s accountant, during the Camp-Baucus Tax Reform Tour stop in Lawrence, N.J. It didn’t result in a legislative victory. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The last time Republican tax writers unveiled legislation for overhauling the tax code, it elicited this telling response from the speaker of the House: “Blah, blah, blah, blah.”

It was Feb. 26, 2014, and the House Ways and Means Committee had just unveiled a tax overhaul discussion draft, with full legislative text and both dynamic and static scores from the Congressional Budget Office.

Campaigns Aren’t Equipped to Vet Donors
Contributions from white supremacists have slipped through in the past

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz’s presidential campaign donated to charity money it received from a white supremacist leader in 2015. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

As the past week has reaffirmed, most congressional candidates don’t want to be associated with white supremacists.

But when it comes to campaign donations, candidates have little control over who supports them. It’s easy enough for politicians to donate to charity or refund contributions from controversial sources. The hard part is finding them.

Trump Costs Prompt Secret Service Plea to Congress
‘The president has a large family, and our responsibility is required in law’

A Secret Service agent wipes down one of the presidential limousines at the U.S. Capitol before the start of the Inauguration parade on Jan. 20, the day Donald Trump was sworn in as president. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Secret Service, anticipating the demands of protecting President Donald Trump and his family, wants Congress to again lift pay caps so it can reimburse its agents for overtime work during fiscal 2018.

Whether the agency will need additional appropriations remains to be decided. But the service, part of the Homeland Security Department, estimates about 1,100 employees will work overtime hours that would exceed the statutory pay caps in place during calendar year 2017, Director Randolph “Tex” Alles said in a statement Monday.

McConnell, Mnuchin Unequivocal About Avoiding Default on the Debt
Majority leader and Treasury secretary say debt limit will be increased on time

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin expressed confidence the debt limit would be increased. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell declared without hesitation Monday that Congress will raise the debt limit come September.

“There is zero chance — no chance — we won’t raise the debt ceiling. No chance. America is not going to default, and we’ll get the job done in conjunction with the secretary of the Treasury,” the Kentucky Republican said, appearing alongside Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin.

Perlmutter Changes Mind, Decides to Run for Re-Election
Colorado Democratic congressman says he has had time to ‘regroup and recharge’

Rep. Ed Perlmutter, D-Colo., has decided to run for re-election. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Rep. Ed Perlmutter reversed course Monday, announcing his decision to run for re-election, shaking up the Democratic primary for his House seat and prompting two candidates to end their campaigns.

The Colorado Democrat had previously said he would not run for re-election after ending his gubernatorial campaign. But Perlmutter changed his mind, saying in a statement that he had decided to run for a 7th term.

Poll: Majority Disapprove of Trump in Rust Belt States That Helped Elect Him
But support stays strong among those who supported him last year

President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence held a “Make America Great Again Rally” in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, to celebrate their first 100 days in office. (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

A new poll shows a majority in three Rust Belt states that helped propel Donald Trump to the White House disapprove of the job he’s doing.

The Marist/NBC News poll released Monday found 55 percent of residents in Michigan disapprove of Trump’s job performance while 36 percent said they approve. In Pennsylvania, 52 percent say they disapprove while 33 percent approve. And in Wisconsin, Trump’s disapproval rate was at 56 while approval was 33.