EPA

Spending Shutdown Showdown Fizzling Out
Issues remain, but biggest fights getting knocked out ahead of deadline

From left, Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, Reps. David McKinley, R-W.Va., and Mike Doyle, D-Pa., attend a news conference at the House Triangle with the United Mine Workers of America on the Miners Protection Act, which would address expiring health care and pension benefits. Funding the miners’ benefits is one of the remaining issues that could affect the debate over government funding. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The first federal funding fight of President Donald Trump’s administration might be ending not with a bang but a whimper. 

House and Senate lawmakers negotiating an omnibus bill to fund the government through the end of September had said the biggest outstanding dispute was over cost-sharing subsidy payments to insurance companies that help lower-income people afford health care under the 2010 overhaul law.

7 Major Battles Ahead on the Environment
The environmental state of play on Trump's first Earth Day
Rising Stars 2017: Advocates
On the front lines in a new era

Seven advocates made the CQ Roll Call’s list of Rising Stars of 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

All this week, CQ Roll Call has been looking at 17 Rising Stars of 2017 — people who will now wield power and influence in a Washington that has been turned upside down by the presidency of Donald Trump.

Some of the names are familiar, others have recently burst on the scene. They include members of Congress, congressional and administration staffers, and advocates.

Podcast: Troubled Climate for Trump’s First Earth Day
The Big Story, Episode 50

President Donald Trump is moving on several fronts to deregulate environmental protection, prompting some states to intervene. But deep EPA budget cuts will get tamed by Congress, and the U.S. might stay with the Paris climate accord; even business leaders and conservative voters worry the anti-green push has gone too far, CQ Roll Call’s Mike Magner and Jeremy Dillon explain.

Opinion: Why Congress Should Value, and Keep, AmeriCorps
The national service program efficiently lifts America’s most needy schoolchildren

Without AmeriCorps, roughly 14.5 million children currently living in families strained by poverty would fall further behind, Dale Erquiaga writes. (Courtesy AmeriCorps Facebook page)

When the new administration’s budget blueprint arrived last month, the math was, to say the least, unsettling. The EPA and State Department would see their budgets slashed by nearly one-third, Agriculture and Labor by 21 percent and the Education Department — which affects my area of work and interest — would take about a 13 percent hit.

The severe proposals sparked an intense and important national debate that continues today. Largely lost in the back and forth, however, has been the proposals affecting AmeriCorps, a program that since its inception has been a model for how to efficiently and effectively improve millions of lives. The Corporation for National and Community Service, or CNCS, which has administered AmeriCorps and other volunteer service programs for a quarter-century, has undoubtedly changed America for the better. But in the proposed budget, CNCS, and with it AmeriCorps, would be eliminated.

Trump Administration Lifts Hiring Freeze
OMB Director Mulvaney: ‘This does not mean that the agencies will be free to hire willy-nilly’

OMB Director Mick Mulvaney sent guidance on federal hiring Wednesday morning. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

New guidance from the Trump administration out Wednesday will officially end the federal hiring freeze implemented days after the president took office.

“This does not mean that the agencies will be free to hire willy-nilly,” Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney told reporters ahead of the formal release.

Opinion: Extreme Executive Orders — A Reckless Assault on Life-Saving Protections
President targeting immigrant communities

President Donald Trump has used executive orders to target immigrant communities, Brent Wilkes and Trip Van Noppen write. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

In January, President Donald Trump took an oath to “preserve, protect and defend the Constitution” and assumed the awesome responsibilities of that office. Presidents are charged with the responsibility to protect all Americans, but unfortunately, he has yet to do so.

He has particularly targeted immigrant communities with executive orders that tear families apart. Most recently, Trump has engaged in a new campaign with executive orders that attack our access to clean air and water while denying climate change.

Some GOP Lawmakers Push Back Against EPA Cuts
Decimating environmental agency could hurt — even in Trump country

President Donald Trump’s recent budget blueprint proposes eliminating roughly 3,200 positions at the EPA along with 50 programs. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images file photo)

As President Donald Trump introduces a series of budget cuts and regulatory rollbacks that would cripple the Environmental Protection Agency, he faces one unpredictable obstacle: resistance from fellow Republicans.

A small but vocal number of GOP lawmakers have rallied in support of popular programs in their districts, including clean water programs in the Great Lakes and the Chesapeake Bay, that are among the biggest losers in the budget Trump proposed to Congress last month.

Mast’s Independence May Be Best Path to Holding Florida Swing Seat
Democrats say it’ll take certain kind of candidate to defeat freshman Republican

Freshman Rep. Brian Mast salutes as he arrives for a town hall meeting in Fort Pierce, Florida, on Feb. 24. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images file photo)

Florida Rep. Brian Mast would have moved the fish tank into his Rayburn office differently.

“I would have gotten these guys a wheelie cart and sloshed it down the hallway, with whatever fish were still in there,” he said, nodding to a nearby aide.

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