federal workers

Federal workers protest ongoing shutdown; union leaders arrested
12 people were arrested by Capitol Police outside of McConnell's office in the Russell Senate Office Building

Federal workers and contractors, along with their unions, staged a protest calling for and end to the government shutdown. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Twelve protesters advocating an end to the government shutdown were arrested Wednesday outside of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office. 

The twelve were arrested by Capitol Police in the Russell Senate Office Building just before 2 p.m., following a larger demonstration where furloughed federal workers and their unions raised their voices.

Watch: 12 demonstrators arrested outside McConnell’s Russell office
 

Hundreds of federal workers held a mostly silent demonstration in the Hart Senate office building Wednesday afternoon to protest the ongoing partial government shutdown. A dozen demonstrators were also arrested outside of Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s Russell office.

Ocasio-Cortez decries shutdown as ‘erosion of American democracy’ in first floor speech
 

Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez gave her maiden House floor speech Wednesday evening, highlighting a federal air traffic controller from her district who is working without pay due to the partial government shutdown.

“It is terrifying to think that almost every single air traffic controller in the United States is currently distracted at work because they don’t know when their next paycheck is coming,” Ocasio-Cortez said.

Amid shutdown and snow, DMV lawmakers reach out to federal workers

Lawmakers across the Washington region spent the weekend touching base with federal workers affected by the government shutdown at roundtables, town halls and potlucks. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Lawmakers across the Washington region spent the weekend touching base with federal workers affected by the government shutdown at roundtables, town halls and potlucks.

Rep. Anthony Brown held a town hall meeting in Largo, Maryland, on Saturday, where he took questions from constituents about the government shutdown.

No ethics issues for federal workers shutdown deals
Restaurants, bars and more offering help for feds not getting paid

Deals and discounts popping up around the DC region during the shutdown aren’t risking ethics violations. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Federal workers must adhere to strict ethical guidelines for accepting meals and favors, but the deals and discounts popping up around the D.C. region during the shutdown aren’t risking violations.

As the partial government shutdown stretches toward being the longest in modern history, dozens of restaurants are offering free and discounted meals to federal workers, many of whom are either furloughed or working without pay. Bars are offering drink discounts and happy hour specials. 

Capitol Ink | Government Shutdown Wall

Shutdown Day 6: Federal Workers Prep for Paycheck Problems, Creditors and Landlords
OPM sends guidance, sample letter

The Office of Personnel Management released draft letters Thursday for federal employees to hold off creditors during the government shutdown. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Office of Personnel Management released draft letters Thursday for federal employees to hold off creditors during the government shutdown.

Nearly 800,000 federal employees have either been furloughed or will be working without pay as the government shutdown enters its sixth day. That means households with federal workers are trying to figure out how to get by without their usual paycheck as the holiday season comes to a close.

Ep. 13: Federal Workforce Reductions Could Hurt Veterans

 

The Trump administration has plans to reduce the number of government workers in the months and years ahead, says CQ Roll Call’s budget reporter Ryan McCrimmon. But those efforts could directly cost veterans in more ways than one, adds Kellie Mejdrich.

GOP Readies Cuts to Federal Workforce Under Trump
Reductions part of long-sought civil service overhaul

Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz is readying a plan that would likely make big changes to federal workers’ generous retirement benefits (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

For years, Republicans in Congress have been eyeing an overhaul of the federal workforce — by reducing the number of workers and curtailing benefits and pay while making it easier to fire bad employees.

Now, with a president-elect who has promised to do much the same, 2017 could be the best time in recent memory to make sweeping changes affecting those who work for the bureaucracy.