After Self-Created Drama, Trump Signs Omnibus
After grousing about deal, president asks for line-item veto

President Donald Trump on Friday first threatened to veto a massive government funding bill only to later sign it into law. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Updated at 2:24 p.m. | President Donald Trump on Friday backed down from a seemingly out-of-the-blue veto threat when he signed a $1.3 trillion omnibus spending package that averts a government shutdown he nearly triggered after lawmakers left town.

The double presidential about-face came on yet another chaotic day at Trump’s White House. Aides, Secret Service agents and journalists scurried about for hours, with the dramatics culminating with Trump announcing a 1 p.m. press conference for which his staff was clearly not prepared.

Expect More Trump on Nomination Fights, Short Says
Legislative affairs chief decries Democrats even as Senate awaits nominees

White House Legislative Affairs Director Marc Short offered more criticism of Senate Democrats on nominations Friday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Clark file photo)

The White House renewed its complaints Friday about the pace of Senate action on nominations Friday, even as President Donald Trump is making the “personnel business” more complicated by shifting his Cabinet and other senior staff positions.

White House Legislative Affairs Director Marc Short described himself as a “warm-up act” and suggested President Donald Trump soon will make a larger “foray” into the nominations debate.

Opinion: Trump’s Name Isn’t on Any Midterm Ballot — But It’s All About Him
Lawmakers can’t keep ignoring president’s misconduct

The Ides of March may not have been a good day for the national security adviser, H.R. McMaster — who, politically speaking, may be in the process of getting shivved by President Donald Trump, Walter Shapiro writes. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images file photo)

It was ghoulishly fitting that Donald Trump got out the long knives on the Ides of March. On a day when top Trump officials might have been justifiably nervous about going to the Forum, Trump apparently decided to fire national security advisor H.R. McMaster, according to The Washington Post.

If McMaster has indeed joined Rex Tillerson in the ever-growing Trump Alumni Association, it should put to rest the glib theory that the so-called “adults in the room” could constrain a petulant president.

Despite Rancor On Tariffs, Senate GOP Rejects Legislative Response
What started off as a war cry has been reduced to a whimper

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says nullifying tariffs on imported steel and aluminum imposed by the president isn't in the cards for his chamber. Also pictured, from right, South Dakota Sen. John Thune and Wyoming Sen. John Barrasso. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Republicans, after decrying President Donald Trump’s recently announced tariffs on imported steel and aluminum, have no plans to pursue legislation to block them from going into effect.

“The thought that the president would undo action he’s taken strikes me as remote at best and I’d like to use floor time in the Senate for things that actually have a chance to become law,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told reporters Tuesday. “I think it’s highly unlikely we’ll be dealing with that in a legislative way.”

With Expectations Low, Select Budget Panel Prepares to Meet
Committee has broad mission, but few hard deadlines

Rep. Steve Womack, the new House Budget Committee chairman, is head of the select budget panel. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The select committee tasked with overhauling the budget and appropriations process is mandated by law to meet for the first time this week. But what they plan to talk about remains a mystery.

The law establishing the committee instructs the 16 members to provide “recommendations and legislative language that will significantly reform the budget and appropriations process” before Nov. 30, with an initial meeting to be held by March 11.

Opinion: The Time to Reform Congress and Our Political System Is Now
Self-examination by lawmakers long overdue

It’s about time that lawmakers reform Congress and the nation’s political system, Reps. Darin LaHood and Daniel Lipinski write. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As members of Congress, we often hear from our constituents that Congress is just not working. Voters back home question how we can get things done, together, across party lines.

These concerns get reinforced when the government shuts down or Congress fails to complete its basic tasks, like writing a funding plan for federal programs on time.

Chris McDaniel Launches Primary Challenge to Roger Wicker
McDaniel urges supporters to remember 2014

Mississippi state Sen. Chris McDaniel, seen here during his 2014 Senate campaign, is challenging Sen. Roger Wicker in the June primary. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As Mississippi Republican state Sen. Chris McDaniel addressed supporters Wednesday afternoon in front of a giant American flag, an aide ran up to affix a Senate campaign sign to the candidate’s wooden podium.

“I guess the cat’s out of the bag,” McDaniel said, standing on stage at Jones Junior College in his hometown of Ellisville.

Attacks Come to Life in First Indiana Senate Primary Debate
Messer, Rokita and Braun sparred in Americans for Prosperity debate

Three Indiana Republicans, including Rep. Todd Rokita, sparred in Tuesday’s debate. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The first debate among Indiana’s three Republican Senate candidates began much as this primary race started — with some punches.

In his opening statement, Rep. Todd Rokita came out swinging. “Mike, welcome to the Republican Party. Luke, welcome back to Indiana,” he said.

When the Deal Precedes the Bid, Time to Change the Rules?
With bipartisan agreement that the budget system is broken, the Hill sets in motion a serious overhaul debate

Boxes containing President Donald Trump’’s fiscal 2019 budget are unpacked by staff in the House Budget Committee hearing room on Monday morning. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The latest unfeasible budget proposal is so two days ago. But a rewrite of the unsalvageable budget process may be unavoidable three seasons from now.

What the White House delivered to the Capitol on Monday were among the least consequential documents of the year. That’s because their fine-print aspirations of fiscal restraint were entirely theoretical. They had been rendered meaningless three days before by the newest law on the books, which makes real the promise of at least $300 billion extra in acceptable appropriations during the next several months.

Opinion: The ‘Dreamer’ Fight Could End in One of Three Ways
Senate has launched debate, House soon to follow

Supporters of so-called Dreamers, immigrants brought to the United States illegally as children, protest outside the Capitol on Jan. 21. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It began more than 16 years ago with two senators, a Democrat and a Republican, offering heart-tugging stories about young constituents buffeted by immigration laws.

For Utah’s Orrin Hatch, it was the tale of a boy named Danny, who was brought to this country as a six-year-old by his mother who had crossed the border illegally. By the time Danny was 14, he was roaming the streets of Salt Lake City without supervision.