Filibuster

Murphy Walks Across Connecticut to Packed Town Halls
Health care, not Charlottesville, was the dominant topic, senator says

Connecticut Sen. Christopher S. Murphy greets a crowd at the finish line in Danbury, Ct. (Courtesy Murphy's Twitter page)

Connecticut Sen. Christopher S. Murphy completed his 110-mile August recess walk across his home state Thursday. It’s the same summer trek the Democratic lawmaker did last year though some of the topics he discussed this time around with constituents along the way were different. 

“When I was talking to apolitical people, which represent the majority of Connecticut, they were talking about kitchen-table issues,” Murphy said.

Brooks Accuses McConnell of Having ‘Misled’ Trump on Strange
Alabama Senate candidate reacts to president’s endorsement of rival

Rep. Mo Brooks, shown here at a candidates’ forum last week in Alabama, said he was “baffled” at how Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and “the Swamp” misled President Donald Trump into endorsing Sen. Luther Strange, his rival in the Alabama Senate race. {Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Alabama Rep. Mo Brooks on Wednesday accused Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of misleading President Donald Trump to endorse Sen. Luther Strange in the Alabama Senate race.

In a statement responding to Trump’s endorsement of his rival a week before the Republican primary, Brooks criticized the president’s decision.

Border Wall, Agents Would Get $15 Billion Boost From Cornyn Bill
DHS was consulted, Senate majority whip says

Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, conducts a news conference on border security legislation in the Capitol on August 3, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Republicans introduced legislation Thursday that would authorize $15 billion for new border wall construction and technology, the hiring of thousands more Border Patrol and interior enforcement agents, and measures to withhold federal funds from so-called sanctuary cities.

The bill, authored by Majority Whip John Cornyn of Texas and Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Chairman Ron Johnson, R-Wis., is a companion measure to a House bill introduced last month by Johnson’s counterpart, House Homeland Security Chairman Michael McCaul, R-Texas.

White House Talks Tax Outreach, but Senators Guarded
Legislative director outlines ambitious timetable

White House legislative affairs director Marc Short, left, here with Wyoming Sen. John Barrasso last week, has hopes for a bipartisan tax overhaul effort. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll)

The White House sees Democrats up for re-election in states President Donald Trump won as possible partners in their effort to overhaul the tax code, but Senate Republicans appear less optimistic about the chances of a bipartisan bill.

White House legislative director Marc Short said Monday the White House is not wed to using the often partisan reconciliation process to advance a tax overhaul, though senators were hesitant to rule out that procedural tool.

Opinion: Question for Congress, What Did You Do During the Trump Reign of Error?
History will judge lawmakers by their behavior during the Trump years

“Oh, I just went along. It seemed more convenient,” won’t appeal to the history books, Shapiro writes. (George LeVines/CQ Roll Call)

I like to imagine that the next president — regardless of party — will reassure the nation in words similar to Jerry Ford’s memorable line after Richard Nixon’s resignation: “My fellow Americans, our long national nightmare is over.”

I do not have the temerity to predict the timetable for the transfer of power. But I have long nurtured the fantasy that on the morning of Jan. 20, 2021, Donald Trump (whose popularity will have slipped below Chris Christie levels) will be alone in the Oval Office screaming at his TV set as even “Fox & Friends” has turned against him.

White House Floats Aggressive Tax Timetable in Fall

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin is helping push the GOP tax overhaul plan. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The White House is not wed to having congressional Republicans use the budget reconciliation process to advance a tax overhaul and is eyeing red state Democrats up for re-election as possible partners in the effort, legislative affairs director Marc Short said Monday.

“We’ve learned how difficult it is to thread the needle with 52 [Republican] senators,” Short said at an event hosted by the conservative Americans for Prosperity at the Newseum.

Trump: Senate Republicans ‘Look Like Fools’
President attacks GOP in confusing tweetstorm

President Donald Trump is once again urging Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to alter the chamber’s legislative filibuster rule. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump slammed Senate Republicans on Saturday, tweeting that they “look like fools” and directly urging Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to alter the chamber’s rules so the party can pass legislation with a simple majority.

But a McConnell aide said it’s not going to happen.

Mo Brooks: ‘If I Were Mitch McConnell, I Would Resign’
Alabama congressman blames Senate majority leader for health care fail

Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala., leaves a meeting of the House Republican Conference in the Capitol on Friday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Mo Brooks said if he was Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, he would resign in the wake of the latest failure of the GOP health bill.

Brooks, R-Ala. said McConnell was “responsible” for the bill’s failure and that he was putting the GOP’s policy plans in jeopardy.

At the Races: Wabash College, Swamp Critters and More
Decisions made and delayed in Nevada

Rep. Luke Messer, seen here in a family photo on the East Front of the Capitol, is running for the Senate. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

As the August recess nears, candidates and maybe-candidates are making decisions that set the stage for both upcoming special elections and the 2018 midterms.

Indiana Rep. Luke Messer announced on Wednesday he’s running for Senate.

Schumer Warns Trump Against Trying to Replace Sessions With Recess Appointment
New York Democrat made remarks on the floor

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer is warning against recess appointments. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Attorney General Jeff Sessions has not even stepped aside, and Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer is already warning President Donald Trump against attempting a recess appointment of a replacement in August.

On the floor Tuesday, the New York Democrat said that members of his caucus were prepared to use every means available to prevent a recess appointment to replace Sessions during the break. That likely means the Senate will technically be in session throughout the month, even after the chamber’s scheduled already-extended time in Washington, D.C.