Florida

Will Hurd: Trump Should Apologize for Charlottesville Remarks
Hurd and other vulnerable members speak out

Rep. Will Hurd, R-Texas, is a vulnerable House Republican. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Rep. Will Hurd called on President Donald Trump to apologize for his latest remarks on recent violence sparked by a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. Hurd, who is African-American, is also one of the most vulnerable House Republicans.

“Nobody should doubt whether the leader of the free world is against racism, bigotry, neo-Nazis and anti-Semitism,” Hurd said in an interview on CNN Thursday evening.

Far-Right Protesters in Virginia Included ‘Very Fine’ People, Trump Says
Trump says ‘both sides’ to blame for Charlottesville unrest

President Donald Trump delivers remarks following a meeting on infrastructure at Trump Tower on Tuesday. He appeared to defend some of the white supremacist groups who help spawn deadly violence Saturday in Virginia. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Tuesday defended some of the neo-Nazis and white supremacists who were part of the deadly Charlottesville, Virginia, protests last weekend, saying there were “very fine people” on both sides of the racially charged unrest.

A defiant Trump, just a day after slamming the pro-white groups who organized the two-day protests of the planned removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee, appeared to give some of their members cover. “There is blame on both sides,” he told reporters during what amounted to a brief impromptu press conference at Trump Tower in New York.

Opinion: Stuck on the Back Bench? Why Not Run for President
Last House member to win presidency was in 1880 — it was an accident

An engraving of President James A. Garfield’s assassination. Not since Garfield has a sitting House member so much as won an electoral vote in a presidential election. (Engraving from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper)

No sitting House member has won an electoral vote for president since 1880, when Ohio’s James A. Garfield captured the White House — and he didn’t even mean to run for the job.

In fact, the Ohio legislature had just voted to appoint Garfield to a Senate term — for which he would have been seated in March 1881 — when the GOP met in Chicago to pick its nominee for the presidency in the summer of 1880.

Word on the Hill: Murphy Walks Again
Updates from the OOC, LOC and Historical Society

Connecticut Sen. Christopher S. Murphy is taking questions as he walks across the Nutmeg State. (Courtesy Murphy via Snapchat)

Sen. Christopher S. Murphy, D-Conn., is making his way across the Nutmeg State on foot … again.

Today is Day Three of the walk. On Monday, he walked from Willimantic to Portland, where he held an evening town hall.

Francis Rooney: Python Hunter
Freshman Republican congressman killed five of the invasive species in the Everglades

Rep. Francis Rooney, R-Fla., posted photographs and video  on Twitter with the hashtag #TheHunt. (Rep. Francis Rooney via Twitter)

What did you do during the August recess? Rep. Francis Rooney, R-Fla., went python hunting in the Everglades and helped catch and kill five of the invasive snakes.

Rooney hunted in the Everglades on Thursday night with other hunters hired by the South Florida Water Management District to remove the snakes, which are decimating the population of native mammals, the Naples Daily News reported.

Rubio Receives Increased Security After Reported Venezuelan Death Order
Senator has had a security detail in Washington and Miami

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., has been one of the most vocal critics of Venezuelan leader Nicolas Maduro. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio has received increased security in light of an order by Venezuelan leaders reportedly putting a death order on him.

Rubio, who has been a fervent critic of the Venezuelan government and leader Nicolas Maduro, has had a detail in both Washington and his home in Miami, the Miami Herald reported. 

Republicans to Weigh Surplus of Tax Policy Options
Standalone bills provide a glimpse into senators’ priorities

South Dakota Sen. John Thune has introduced several standalone bills that could be wrapped into a broader overhaul of the U.S. tax code. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Legislation introduced by Republican senators over the past several months could help guide the upcoming debate on an overhaul of the U.S. tax code.

While the effort is still in the adolescent stage, the bills provide an early look into the priorities members will push for during the forthcoming tax negotiations.

Former NFL Player Considering Congressional Bid in Ohio
Anthony Gonzalez has met with NRCC about seat being vacated by Rep. Jim Renacci

Anthony Gonzalez played for five seasons in the NFL. (IndianapolisColts.com)

Anthony Gonzalez, a former wide receiver for Ohio State University and later the Indianapolis Colts of the NFL, is weighing a run for Congress in Ohio’s 16th District, sources told Cleveland.com.

The seat will likely be up for grabs as Republican Rep. Jim Renacci, who has occupied it since 2010, plans a run to replace term-limited Ohio Gov. John Kasich.

Kaiser Study: Uncertainty Over Obamacare’s Future Increasing Rates
Millions face double-digit increases in 2018 from unclear Trump administration policies

President Donald Trump, center, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., have butted heads over health care blame this week. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Trump administration policies — or the murkiness surrounding them — will increase millions of Americans’ health care premiums by double digits in 2018, a new nonpartisan study found.

In Wilmington, Del., for instance, consumers can expect a 49 percent hike on their rates.

Zack Barth ‘Not Living in Fear’ After Congressional Baseball Shooting
Hill staffer talks about his shooter, his faith and life afterward

Zack Barth, an aide to Texas Rep. Roger Williams, was wounded in the leg during the shooting at the Republicans’ baseball practice in Arlington, Va., on June 14. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Zack Barth was never supposed to be dodging bullets in the outfield.

His job was to feed fly balls back to the infield for Republican lawmakers during an early-morning baseball practice ahead of the annual Congressional Baseball Game against the Democrats.