food

Trump Comes Out Swinging Against Familiar Foes
Ignoring stumbles, president says administration is a ‘fine-tuned machine’

President Donald Trump focused on familiar targets in his news conference on Thursday. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Thursday handed the Senate a new Labor secretary nominee who has previously been approved by the chamber three times — but he used the next 75 minutes to rouse his base and goad his critics. 

Trump walked into the East Room of the White House and announced that Alexander Acosta, a former assistant attorney general, will be his second pick to run the Labor Department after fast-food mogul Andrew Puzder withdrew his nomination on Wednesday.

Puzder Backs Out of Labor Secretary Nomination
Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. head lacked confirmation votes

Andrew Puzder leaves a November meeting with Donald Trump in Bedminster Township, New Jersey. Trump later nominated Puzder to head the Labor Department though recent reports indicate that Puzder is expected to withdraw his nomination. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Andrew Puzder, President Donald Trump’s nominee for Labor secretary, backed out of the confirmation process Wednesday.

In a statement released by the CEO of CKE Restaurants, which runs the Carl’s Jr. and Hardee’s chains, Puzder said he decided to withdraw his nomination after “careful consideration and discussions with [his] family.”

Supreme Court Nominee Neil Gorsuch Copies and Pastes
Responses from his appellate judge confirmation process reappear

In his response to a Senate Judiciary Committee questionnaire, Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch has listed his most significant cases, including a few that Democrats will point to as troubling signs about his judicial philosophy. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Judge Neil Gorsuch sailed through the Senate’s judicial confirmation process in 2006, and that already has helped him fill out key paperwork now that lawmakers are scrutinizing his legal career again as a Supreme Court nominee. 

Gorsuch, 49, has turned in a Senate Judiciary Committee questionnaire with some portions apparently copied and pasted from a similar questionnaire from a decade ago, when the Senate confirmed him on a voice vote to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit.

Report Shows ‘Untapped Power’ of Constituent Advocacy
Showing the local effects of legislation can better influence lawmakers

People react to Rep. Jason Chaffetz as he speaks during a town hall meeting at Brighton High School, Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017, in Cottonwood Heights, Utah. Hundreds of people lined up early for the town hall with Chaffetz on Thursday evening, many holding signs criticizing the congressman's push to repeal the newly-named Bears Ears National Monument in southern Utah. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

Sensenbrenner Admonishes Town Hall Audience To Be Respectful
Also hints at possible punishment for national security adviser

Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., told one angry woman that she could go out in the hallway if she wouldn't be respectful. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo).

Rep. Jim Sensnenbrenner, R-Wis., urged his constituents to be respectful during heated exchanges at town hall meetings in Pewaukee and Elm Grove over the weekend.

Sensenbrenner frequently scolded the audience that included Democratic activists, and banged a gavel to bring the town hall to order, WITI-TV in Milwaukee reported.

Word on the Hill: It’s a Healthy Day
What's happening this week?

Maria Marlowe poses with author Dr. Mark Hyman and his newest book last year. (Brent N. Clarke/Getty Images file photo)

It’s the first day of national Health and Wellness Coach Week and to kick it off, Ivanka Trump’s former health coach is coming to Capitol Hill.

Maria Marlowe writes a monthly food column and is the founder of an integrative nutrition health coaching practice in New York. She will be joined by other health leaders for a congressional briefing at noon in the Capitol Visitor Center, Room 201AB.

A Fresh Start for Health Care Reform

BY PATRICK HOPE, MARK LEAHEY AND SCOTT WHITAKER

The New Year is a time for fresh starts and new beginnings — to set goals and commit to meeting them. In Washington, it is a time for renewed focus on the issues that affect millions of Americans. It’s clear that health care reform is a top priority for the new Administration and Congressional leaders, and it is our hope that policymakers on both sides of the aisle will come together to support health care policies that allow patients worldwide to live longer, healthier and more productive lives — starting with an immediate and permanent repeal of the burdensome medical device tax.

D.C. Mardi Gras Gives Louisiana Delegation a Taste of Home
‘It’s a good chance to mix pleasure and business,’ says Sen. John Kennedy

The Scalise family celebrates the Mardi Gras season in New Orleans last month. Back: Jennifer Scalise, Whip Steve Scalise. Front: Harrison Scalise, Madison Scalise. (Courtesy Rep. Steve Scalise’s office)

D.C. Mardi Gras is one of the Louisiana delegation’s favorite traditions, and a chance to do a little work.

The annual Louisiana ALIVE celebration, which showcases the state’s culture, takes place Thursday at the Washington Hilton. That’s followed by Friday’s Festival dinner, and Saturday’s Mardi Gras Ball, a black-tie event.

Black History Month: Cedric Richmond on the ‘Work to Do’ Ahead
CBC chairman says promises of King, Chisholm haven’t yet been fulfilled

Louisiana Rep. Cedric L. Richmond speaks with New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker after the two, along with Georgia Rep. John Lewis, testified last month against the nomination of Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions to be attorney general on the grounds of his civil rights history. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

For Congressional Black Caucus Chairman Cedric L. Richmond, this month is about teaching. First celebrated in 1926 as a weeklong tribute to black history and culture and expanded to a monthlong honor in 1976, Black History Month is a time of reflection and festivity for many African-Americans. Roll Call interviewed Richmond and several other lawmakers and Capitol Hill figures, such as Senate Chaplain Barry C. Black, to find out what the intersection of black history and life in Congress and the Capitol building itself means to them.

Watch interviews and the video, “Black History and America's Capitol,” which combines all these talks, at rollcall.com/black-history-month. Richmond’s full discussion with Roll Call is below.

Supreme Court Nominee’s Legal Approach Follows Scalia
Analysis of past rulings reveal an ideology similar to late justice’s

Judge Neil Gorsuch, President Donald Trump’s nominee for the Supreme Court, left, and Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley arrive to speak to reporters following their meeting in the Capitol on Feb. 1. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Judge Neil Gorsuch included a line in his first remarks as a Supreme Court nominee that signals just how closely his approach to deciding cases aligns with the late Antonin Scalia, the polarizing and reliably conservative justice whose seat Gorsuch would fill.

“A judge who likes every outcome he reaches is very likely a bad judge, stretching for results he prefers rather than those the law demands,” Gorsuch, 49, said at the White House last Tuesday.