Fred Upton

Opinion: Trump Needs to Reread ‘The Art of the Comeback’
The president’s political embrace and his threats are both equally empty

President Donald Trump waves to the crowd after addressing a joint session of Congress in the Capitol's House Chamber, February 28, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

After just nine weeks in the Oval Office, Donald Trump is already forced to resort to his third book, “The Art of the Comeback.”

From James Comey’s artfully cloaked shiv in last Monday’s congressional testimony to the head-for-the-lifeboats abandonment of Trumpcare on Friday, it is hard to recall a president who has had a worse week without someone being indicted.

Little Agreement Among GOP Members on Health Care Bill Next Steps
Regular conference meeting canceled ahead of Freedom Caucus meeting with Trump

House Republican Conference Chairwoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers said repeal of the so-called essential health benefits provision in the Republican health care plan, which Freedom Caucus members have pushed for, might not be allowed under Senate rules. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans had hoped to vote on a bill to partially repeal and replace the landmark 2010 health care law on Thursday, seven years to the day after President Barack Obama signed it. Instead, they find themselves without the votes to do so and little agreement on their next move.

The House GOP conference’s weekly Thursday planning meeting, at which lawmakers might have decided on next steps, was canceled Thursday morning. Members of the conservative Freedom Caucus, which opposed the bill, are scheduled to meet with President Donald Trump at 11:30 a.m., so progress on the bill may not be made until midday Thursday or later.

Democrats Tie Senate Candidates to House GOP Health Care Plan
DSCC memo outlines ‘new health care dynamic’ for 2018

Nevada Sen. Dean Heller is a top target for Democrats in 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Democrats plan to hold Senate Republicans — and House Republicans who may run for the Senate — accountable for the health care plan proposed by House GOP leadership this week. 

“The new health care dynamic: GOP Senate candidates own this plan” is the subject line of a Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee memo released to interested parties Thursday and obtained first by Roll Call.

Tennessee, Texas Stand Out for Strengthened Hill Sway
In Roll Call’s Clout Index for this Congress, California delegation’s longtime hold on top spot is threatened

Party affiliation and longevity have helped propel members of the Tennessee delegation such as Sen. Bob Corker into positions that convey authority and power, Hawkings writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

No state in this decade has seen a more meaningful boost than Tennessee in institutionalized congressional influence.

Only eight states, all with much bigger delegations because they’re much more populous, have more overt sway at the Capitol this year. That is one of several notable findings from the new Roll Call Clout Index, which the newspaper uses to take a quantifiable measurement of every state’s potential for power at the start of each new Congress.  

Drug Industry Spending Jumped As Cures Crossed Finish Line

Rep. Pat Tiberi, R-Ohio, walks to the Capitol for a vote on Thursday, Sept. 8, 2016. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry lobbying giants ramped up their advocacy spending in the final three months of 2016, just as Congress was finalizing a new law aimed at speeding drug development and research.

The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America dropped $4.9 million in the fourth quarter of 2016, up from $3.8 in the same quarter in 2015, a CQ analysis of new lobbying filings shows. The Biotechnology Innovation Organization spent $2.3 million to influence policymakers over the same three months, up from $2.1 million the year before.

Greg Walden Endorsed for House Energy and Commerce Chairman
Phil Roe picked to head VA panel

Oregon Rep. Greg Walden will chair the powerful House Energy and Commerce Committee next year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

By Joe Williams and Lindsey McPherson
CQ Roll Call

Rep. Greg Walden won a key vote on Thursday to become the next chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

‘Cures’ Research Package Draws Strong Bipartisan Vote
Measure’s Senate prospects deemed positive

Reps. Fred Upton of Michigan and Diana DeGette of Colorado high-five Max Schill, 6, from Williamstown, N.J., after the House voted in favor of an earlier version of the 21st Century Cures Act in July 2015. Upton and DeGette spearheaded the bill. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Wednesday night approved, 392-26, a sweeping biomedical research package that also aims to overhaul the mental health system and make targeted changes to Medicare.

Representatives passed an earlier version of the legislation, known as 21st Century Cures, last year, only to see it get delayed in the Senate over disagreements on mandatory funding for the National Institutes of Health and the Food and Drug Administration, among other things.

House ’Cures’ Package Could Hit Potholes in Senate
Questions over funding, disclosure of gifts to doctors

Iowa Sen. Charles E. Grassley objects to a provision in the ‘Cures’ package and says he will object to an expected request for unanimous consent to take up the House bill in the Senate unless this provision is removed. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

An expansive plan to spur the development of new medical treatments that’s on the fast track in the House could encounter resistance on the other side of the Capitol over disclosure requirements and the way the legislation is funded.

Lawmakers late last week released an updated version of a long-stalled package known as the 21st Century Cures Act. While many provisions remain from the version the House passed last year, additions include language designed to improve the nation’s mental health system and $1 billion over two years to help combat misuse of prescription opioids.

A Guide to House Leadership, Committee, Caucus Elections
Races will place at least 17 members in new positions of power

The race for chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee will be between Texas Rep. Roger Williams and Ohio Rep. Steve Stivers. (File photos by Bill Clark/Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

While much speculation over House leadership changes in the 115th Congress is focused on a contentious speaker’s election that may never materialize, a long series of intraparty leadership, committee and caucus races guarantee significant turnover in top House posts next year.   

Retirements, term limits and lawmakers departing for other jobs mean that at least 17 prominent roles, and likely more, will change hands. Elections to determine those new influencers are set to begin during the lame-duck session that opens the week after Election Day.

‘Cures’ Package Not Unanimously Backed by Democrats, Pelosi Says
NIH funding aimed at bringing some lawmakers on board

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., signaled disagreements exist among Democrats over the 21st Century Cures biomedical research package. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi told reporters Wednesday that she stands ready to help pass the 21st Century Cures bill in the lame-duck session but “that’s not a universal view” among House Democrats.

“Some people don’t have the same support for it, so we’re just going to have to build consensus,” the California Democrat said.