George Holding

Meet the Challengers Who Outraised House Incumbents
Some Democrats raised two to three times more than GOP lawmakers in third quarter

Democrat Anthony Brindisi raised more money during the third quarter than GOP freshman Rep. Claudia Tenney in New York’s 22nd District. (Tom Williams/Roll Call)

Nearly one year out from the 2018 midterms, challengers outraised nearly 30 percent of the incumbents in competitive races during the third quarter.

Sixteen Republican incumbents in competitive races raised less than their Democratic challengers during the third quarter. One Democratic incumbent was outraised by a GOP challenger.

Post Office Naming Sparks Feud in North Carolina
G.K. Butterfield says 2 GOP congressmen are retaliating over Jesse Helms snub

Rep. G.K. Butterfield said two of his fellow North Carolina congressmen are retaliating against him over naming buildings in their home state. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Bills intending to rename post offices and other federal buildings routinely make their way through the House — but one is causing a rift among the North Carolina congressional delegation.

Democratic Rep. G.K. Butterfield told The (Durham) Herald Sun that two of his Republican colleagues are refusing to sign on to a bill he introduced that would rename a federal building after a civil rights leader in retaliation for his not supporting a bill that would rename a building after former North Carolina Republican Sen. Jesse Helms.

At the Races: A Case of the Mondays
Busy day for annoucements, from North Carolina to California

Rep. Rick Nolan, D-Minn., has picked up a top-flight GOP challenger. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Minnesota Republican Pete Stauber, a St. Louis County commissioner, announced his candidacy for the state’s 8th District on Monday.

House elections in the northern Gopher State district, represented by Democratic-Farmer-Labor Rep. Rick Nolan, have been among the most competitive and expensive in the country for the last two cycles.

Vodka Distillery Owner Takes On George Holding in North Carolina
Sam Searcy says GOP health care vote was impetus for his campaign

Democrat Sam Searcy is challenging North Carolina Rep. George Holding, above, he announced on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Democrats are hoping that the owner of a new vodka distillery in Durham can help them pick up a suburban Raleigh district currently represented by GOP North Carolina Rep. George Holding.

Democrat Sam Searcy announced his campaign for North Carolina’s 2nd District on Monday. The 40-year-old Holly Springs resident says the House’s vote for the GOP health care bill was the final push he needed to run. He’d been thinking about a bid for Congress even before Donald Trump was elected president last fall.

Ellmers Gets HHS Job
The first Republican woman to endorse Trump

Former Rep. Renee Ellmers, R-N.C., will serve as director for the Department of Health and Human Service's regional office in Atlanta. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former North Carolina Rep. Renee Ellmers has landed a job in the Trump administration as director for the Department of Health and Human Service’s regional office in Atlanta.

Ellmers started her job Wednesday, the News & Observer in Raleigh reported. 

Word on the Hill: White House Easter Egg Roll
Your social calendar for the week

Young attendees roll Easter eggs on the South Lawn of the White House last year. The first White House Easter Egg Roll was held in 1878 under President Rutherford B. Hayes. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The 139th annual White House Easter Egg Roll is happening today on the South Lawn.

Festivities take place from 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. and both President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump are expected to take part.

With Enthusiasm High, Democrats School Potential Candidates on Realities of Running
The party is seeing unprecedented early interest in running for Congress

Amid the high interest, many first-time candidates may not be aware of what it takes to run for Congress. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

All around the country, Democrats interested in running for office are crawling out of the woodwork. But how many of these potential candidates will turn into serious congressional candidates? 

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee has already talked to 275 people in 68 districts wanting to run — 20 people in one Illinois district alone.

Yesterday’s US Attorneys May Be Tomorrow’s Congressional Candidates
Abrupt ouster by Trump administration provides incentive

Dana Boente could be a plausible challenger to Republican Scott Taylor in Virginia’s 2nd District. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump’s abrupt ouster of almost half the country’s U.S. attorneys has done more than create yet another tempest for his nascent administration. It’s also created a new and potentially potent Democratic political class.

Campaign consultants in both parties have long identified prosecutors — especially those confirmed by the Senate to act as the chief federal law enforcement officers in the nation’s 93 judicial districts — as top-flight congressional recruiting opportunities. But, for reasons that aren’t all that obvious, the Republicans have propelled many more crime busters onto Capitol Hill than the Democrats in recent years.

K Street Money Fuels House Challengers to Victory
Primary hopefuls woo lobbyists, some listen

K Street is written above the entrance to an office building in downtown Washington, DC. K Street is the center of the political lobbyist industry in Washington. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Tim Huelskamp alienated business lobbyists during his three House terms as he pushed for government shutdowns and an end to the Export-Import Bank. Lobbyists responded by backing the Kansas Republican’s primary opponent.

Huelskamp lost that contest in Kansas' 1st District last month to Roger Marshall, an OB-GYN, who appears to be a shoo-in for the safe GOP seat.

Supreme Court to Hear N.C. Gerrymandering Case
Challenges affect districts held by Butterfield, Adams

North Carolina Rep. G.K. Butterfield's district is one of two where the Supreme Court will look at how the boundaries were drawn. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Supreme Court will hear an appeal from the state of North Carolina next term over racial gerrymandering challenges to the 1st and 12th congressional districts in North Carolina.

The state had appealed a lower court ruling that found those two districts were illegally packed with black voters, thereby diluting their influence in the rest of the state.