government shutdown

The Fiscal 2018 Budget: It’ll Be a Slog
Budget Tracker Extra, Episode 16

 

With fiscal 2017 spending finally done, lawmakers are belatedly poised to begin working on fiscal 2018 funding, say CQ Roll Call's budget editor Jane Norman and Budget Tracker editor David Lerman. But the freshly passed House health care bill is likely to consume lawmakers’ time, further jamming up budget work, adds Lerman.

Health Care Will Determine Progress of Rest of Agenda
Spending debate, tax code rewrite all interrelated

Senate Finance Chairman Orrin G. Hatch, R-Utah, whose panel has jurisdiction over much of any health care package, says the chamber will take a more deliberative approach aiming at 51 votes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Last week’s legislative victories — finishing an omnibus spending bill and getting the rollback of the 2010 health care law through the House — are the foundation for the months of battles to come on Capitol Hill. 

Appropriators can begin to turn their attention toward the first full fiscal year of Donald Trump’s presidency, but their Senate colleagues will also have to deal with the procedural morass that comes with trying to reinvent the health care system through budget reconciliation.

Senate Clears $1 Trillion Omnibus for President’s Signature
Bill funds government through September

Sen. Roy Blunt, left, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, were among the Republicans speaking in support of the omnibus ahead of Thursday's vote. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Months later than many appropriators would have liked, the voting has wrapped up its work to fund the government through the end of September.

Senators voted 79-18 to send the $1.07 trillion omnibus bill, which featured the remaining 11 of the 12 regular spending measures as well as a variety of emergency spending measures, on to President Donald Trump.

The Art of the Spending Deal
The Big Story, Episode 52

Congress struck a deal on a long-overdue spending bill, and all hell broke loose. CQ Roll Call’s Jason Dick, Niels Lesniewski and Walter Shapiro discuss how Washington’s dynamics prevent even a small victory party from breaking out.

Republicans Facing Re-Election Adjust to an Unpredictable President
Incumbents focus on local successes while waiting for a major legislative win

New Jersey Republican Rep. Leonard Lance is charting his own course in the 7th District and isn’t supporting his party's health care plan. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

If there’s been one constant in President Donald Trump’s first 100 days, it’s unpredictability.

He keeps members of his party — even his own staffers — guessing about what he may say or do on any given policy issue. For Republicans running for Congress in 2018, that instability only underscores the importance of running localized races.

With End in Sight for Omnibus, Dissonance Takes Over
Sore feelings take hold even as deal heads to passage

Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker is among the Republicans who say he will not support the omnibus spending bill when the Senate considers it later this week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

On a day Congress could have spent singing the praises of a bipartisan agreement to wrap up the long-overdue fiscal 2017 spending process, seemingly everyone — from Capitol Hill to the White House — found a way to hit dissonant notes. 

“They’re walking around acting like they pulled a fast one on the president, and I just won’t stand for it,” Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney said Tuesday afternoon at the third of three press briefings he conducted in a 24-hour period after congressional Democrats started effusively praising the omnibus spending deal as a win for their priorities.

Opinion: The Biggest Mess in Washington? Not on Capitol Hill
Early legislative losses a bad omen for Trump administration

The fact that President Donald Trump is losing votes on Capitol Hill so early in his first year is a terrible omen for everything else he wants to do, Patricia Murphy writes. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

 

It’s early May in the first year of Donald Trump’s presidency and the White House is already out of juice on Capitol Hill. Mark May 2, 2017 as the day the cup ran dry. 

Analysis: Defensive White House Insists ‘We Are Competent’
Budget director decries Democrats ‘acting like they pulled a fast one on the president’

Rep. Mick Mulvaney, R-S.C., has been aggressively reacting to Democrats' praise of the omnibus spending deal. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Trump administration delivered a public service announcement on Tuesday: “We are competent, we know what we’re doing, and the country is safe in our hands.”

On its 103rd day in power, the declaration brought forth comparison to Secretary of State Alexander Haig’s declaration after President Ronald Reagan was shot, “I’m in control here.”

House Conservatives on Omnibus: 'It Stinks'
Freedom Caucus complicates passage, GOP message on spending package

Speaker Paul D. Ryan is touting a fiscal 2017 spending package as a win for Republicans, going against his conservative colleagues and President Donald Trump, while Democrats say the package is a victory for them as well.  (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan on Tuesday touted what he called "conservative wins" Tuesday in an omnibus package that would fund the government until September, despite members of his own GOP conference who beg to differ.

Several members of the House Freedom Caucus say they will vote against the spending package because it did not include enough of President Donald Trump's priorities even after members of the president’s own team, including his budget director, touted their own victories.

Trump Wants September Shutdown to Kill Legislative Filibuster
President appears unconcerned with power he could hand future Democratic chief executive

President Donald Trump tweeted that “Our country needs a good ‘shutdown’ in September to fix this mess!” (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Updated 11:17 a.m. | President Donald Trump on Tuesday endorsed ending filibusters of legislation in the Senate and allowing bills to pass via a simple majority — while calling for a government shutdown in September seemingly to force such a momentous change.

Trump made the stunning call a day after his White House and congressional GOP leaders struggled to counter Democratic claims of victory over a $1 trillion fiscal 2017 spending measure that is expected to hit Trump’s desk late this week.