Hearing

Gaetz's 2008 DUI resurfaces during impeachment debate

Rep. Matt Gaetz speaks Thursday during a House Judiciary Committee markup of the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., cited a New Yorker profile of Hunter Biden during amendment debate Thursday during the House Judiciary Committee’s markup on articles of impeachment. The profile alleged crack cocaine use by Hunter Biden, which Gaetz read out loud to the panel.

Rep. Hank Johnson, D-Ga., was quick to respond, saying, “The pot calling the kettle black is not something we should do.” The idiom was a nod to Gaetz’s 2008 arrest for driving under the influence.

Word play draws pushback at impeachment hearing

Stanford Law professor Pamela Karlan testifies during the House Judiciary Committee hearing on Wednesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

A witness in the House Judiciary Committee’s first impeachment inquiry hearing apologized Wednesday afternoon for comments she made during the hearing about President Donald Trump’s youngest son, Barron Trump.

Responding to a question from Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, Pamela Karlan, a Stanford Law professor, said, “the Constitution says there can be no titles of nobility. So while the president can name his son Barron, he can’t make him a baron.”

Live stream: Judiciary Committee’s first impeachment inquiry hearing
Constitutional law experts testify on impeachment

Live: House Intelligence impeachment hearing with Fiona Hill and David Holmes

Dr. Fiona Hill, the former senior director for Europe and Russia on the National Security Council, and David Holmes, a Foreign Service officer who works for Ambassador William Taylor at the U.S Embassy in Kyiv, Ukraine, testify before the House Intelligence Committee Thursday.

Inside the impeachment hearing room

Gordon Sondland, U.S. ambassador to the European Union, arrives to testify before the House Intelligence Committee during a hearing on the impeachment inquiry of President Trump in Longworth Building on Wednesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Prisons chief critical of guards sleeping on the job
Bureau of Prisons director responds to bipartisan scrutiny

Dr. Kathleen Hawk Sawyer, director of the Federal Bureau of Prisons, testifies at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senators from both sides of the aisle pushed Dr. Kathleen Hawk Sawyer, the director of the Federal Bureau of Prisons, Tuesday morning on the suicide of Jeffrey Epstein in August.

Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Neb., one of the Judiciary Committee members who focused on the Epstein case in questioning, ultimately turned his attention to broader problems.

Live: House Intelligence impeachment hearing with Kurt Volker and Tim Morrison

Immigration chief spars with Missouri lawmaker over ‘medical deferred-action’ policy
‘How cruel!’ Rep. Clay responds to Cuccinelli’s testimony

Ken Cuccinelli, acting director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, and Rep. William Lacy Clay, D-Mo., during a House Oversight subcommittee hearing Wednesday on the administration’s policy towards foreigners in the U.S. with serious illnesses. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

The acting director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services faced tough questions from several members of the House Oversight and Reform hearing Wednesday on the agency’s since-reversed decision to end granting foreign nationals with serious medical conditions the temporary ability to stay in the country.

Rep. William Lacy Clay, D-Mo., used his allotted five minutes to ask Ken Cuccinelli if he had heard about several cases interest groups had brought to the agency’s attention. Clay characterized them as “truly heartbreaking.” 

Ted Danson: Don’t fall for the false promise of recycling

A Capitol Police officer arrests actor Ted Danson at an Oct. 25 climate protest, less than a week before his testimony at a House Natural Resources subcommittee hearing. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Surgeon General: ‘Addiction can happen to anyone,’ even my brother

Surgeon General Jerome Adams sprays a dose of naloxone in the air at a Senate hearing Thursday. (Screenshot/Senate Finance Committee)

Surgeon General Jerome Adams spoke about his personal connection to the opioid epidemic in a Senate Finance Committee hearing Thursday.