indictment

House committee renews ethics inquiries into Collins, Hunter and Schweikert
Probes of Hunter and Collins, who are under indictment, put on hold at Justice Department request

Arizona Rep. David Schweikert is one of three Republicans, along with  Chris Collins and Duncan Hunter, who will remain under investigation by the House Ethics Committee for the 116th Congress. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call photo)

House Ethics Committee investigations into Republicans Chris Collins of New York, Duncan Hunter of California and David Schweikert of Arizona were reauthorized for the 116th Congress this week.

The Ethics Committee voted unanimously to reauthorize investigative subcommittees looking into the three lawmakers, but the panel agreed to a Justice Department request to put its probes into Collins and Hunter on hold as they battle criminal indictments.

Former Rep. Robin Hayes indicted in North Carolina political money scandal
Indictment references a “Public Official A,” who allegedly met with those charged

Former Rep. Robin Hayes, R-N.C., and three other men were indicted in a bribery, fraud and political money scandal in North Carolina. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo).

A bribery, fraud and political money scandal in North Carolina rocked the state’s Republicans on Tuesday with federal indictments of party insiders, including former Rep. Robin Hayes, and the case may reverberate yet on Capitol Hill.

Federal prosecutors have charged Hayes, chairman of the state’s Republican party, and three others, including big donor Greg Lindberg, founder and chairman of Eli Global, in connection with an effort to bribe the state insurance commissioner with campaign donations, according to a federal indictment unsealed Tuesday.

House Republicans Propose Punishments for Indicted Members
Chris Collins, Duncan Hunter cases pushed issue to the fore

House Republicans propose to strip indicted colleagues of committee and leadership roles. (Bill Clark / CQ Roll Call).

Rep. Linda Sánchez’s Husband Indicted for Theft of Federal Funds
California Democrat dropped leadership bid citing “unexpected family matter”

House Democratic Caucus Vice Chair Linda Sanchez, D-Calif., says she’s dropping out of the race for caucus chair because her husband is facing federal charges. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The “unexpected family matter” cited by California Rep. Linda T. Sánchez in withdrawing from the race for House Democratic Caucus chair relates to her husband, who was indicted on theft and conspiracy charges related to spending corporate money on personal trips, including some allegedly spent on Sánchez. 

“Earlier today I learned that my husband is facing charges in Connecticut,” Sánchez said in a statement Thursday. “After careful consideration of the time and energy being in leadership demands, I have decided that my focus now needs to be on my son, my family, and my constituents in California.”

Duncan Hunter in Indictment: ‘Tell the Navy to Go F*** Themselves’
Prosecutors allege California Republican also falsely claimed expenditures for ‘wounded warriors’

The federal indictment of Rep. Duncan Hunter. R-Calif., center, includes details of his cursing the Navy and misrepresenting funds for wounded warriors. He is shown here in a 2012 photo with former Rep. Tim Murphy, R-Pa., left, who resigned in October 2017 after admitting to an extramarital affair, and Rep. Adam Kinzinger, R-Ill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A federal indictment alleges that House Armed Services member Duncan Hunter was not happy when he didn’t get a tour of a military base in Italy and had this to say: “Tell the Navy to go f--- themselves.”

Prosecutors also accused the California Republican of falsely claiming that personal expenditures were for “wounded warriors.”

Bipartisan Duo Proposes Prohibiting House Members From Serving on Public Company Boards
Resolution to amend House rules comes in wake of Chris Collins insider trading

Reps. Tom Reed, R-N.Y., pictured, and Kathleen Rice, D-N.Y., are proposing a change in House rules to prohibit members from serving on boards of publicly-traded companies. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A bipartisan New York duo is proposing a change in House rules that would prohibit members from serving on serving on the boards of publicly held companies, the latest fallout from the indictment of Rep. Chris Collins, R-N.Y., for insider trading. 

Collins served on the board of Innate Immunotherapeutics, an Australian biotechnology company, and allegedly shared inside knowledge about Innate’s drug trial results with his son, who then made timely stock trades. 

3 Eye-Popping Details in the Chris Collins Case Documents
Bad news at the White House, in-law joint indictments and prior knowledge

The events leading to Rep. Chris Collins, R-N.Y., arrest are eye-catching. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

New York Republican Rep. Chris Collins was arrested Wednesday on charges including insider trading and lying to authorities. The indictment documents and related complaint from the Securities and Exchange Commission illuminate a wild chain of events that led to the arrest.

Here are three of the most eye-popping details from the documents:

Rep. Michael Grimm Indicted for Fraud

Rep. Michael Grimm , R-N.Y., was indicted on Monday on charges of underreporting payroll for his New York health-food restaurant, Healthicious.  

Grimm was charged with hiding more than $1 million in restaurant receipts and employee wages, as well as hiding a separate set of computer payroll records. The indictment charges Grimm with wire fraud, mail fraud, employment of illegal immigrants, perjury, obstruction of justice, obstructing and impeding tax laws and conspiracy to defraud the government.  

Michael Grimm Indicted on 20 Counts (Updated)

(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Updated 12:50 p.m. | Rep. Michael G. Grimm, R-N.Y., was handed a 20-count indictment on Monday morning, relating to the health food store he owned and operated prior to his election to Congress in 2010.  

The second-term congressman, who surrendered to authorities in New York earlier in the day, has now been released on a $400,000 bond, according to local news reports. Grimm's hometown paper, the Staten Island Advance, reported that the terms of his release restricts his travel to the continental United States. He also must surrender his passport, which Grimm reportedly said was in Washington, D.C.