Iran

Senators Make Another Bid to Authorize War Against ISIS
Flake and Kaine have tried before

Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake is introducing another proposal for authorizing the use of military force against ISIS. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

“When I voted in 2001 to authorize military force against the perpetrators of the September 11th attacks, I had no idea I would be authorizing armed conflict for more than fifteen years, and counting.”

That’s what Sen. Jeff Flake said Thursday. The Arizona Republican was announcing yet another effort with Sen. Tim Kaine, a Virginia Democrat, to get Congress to go on record to authorize the use of military force against the Islamic State and other terror groups.

East Jerusalem Should Be Palestinian Capital, Abbas Insists
Israelis reject that notion showing Trump how tough a peace pact will be

Demonstrators hold posters during a protest against U.S. President Donald Trump next to the American consulate on Monday night in Jerusalem. (Lior Mizrahi/Getty Images)

Updated at 7:44 a.m. President Donald Trump continued to press for an Israeli-Palestinian peace deal during a stop in Bethlehem, but comments by Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas showed just how difficult such a pact will be.

As Trump said Abbas and Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu have assured him they want to “work towards that goal in good faith,” the Palestinian leader laid down a key marker for potential talks that his Israeli counterparts have rejected in the past.

No Apology for Israel Over Trump’s Disclosure to Russians
Tillerson: ‘I don’t know that there’s anything to apologize for’

President Donald Trump (L) speaks during a joint statement with Israeli President Reuven Rivlin in Jerusalem on Monday. (Lior Mizrahi/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump does not plan to apologize to Israeli leaders for disclosing sensitive intelligence provided by the Jewish country to senior Russian diplomats.

Asked by reporters Monday on Air Force One if Trump will apologize to Israeli leaders for sharing password-only classified intelligence about an Islamic State plot to Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson replied: “I don’t know that there’s anything to apologize for.”

Hill and Mueller Don’t Have to Clash, but It Will Not Be Easy
Congressional inquiries and prosecutors have different purposes, but the same witnesses

Former FBI Director Robert Mueller’s appointment as special counsel for the Russia investigation was greeted positively by lawmakers, but they disagreed on the effect his probe will have on their own investigations. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Congressional inquiries and special counsels can productively coexist, serving complementary purposes because of their reciprocal approaches, unless they’re unable to settle inevitable fights over the same documents and star witnesses.

That may be the best response to a question many on Capitol Hill started asking as soon as Robert S. Mueller III was appointed to run the government’s probe of Russian interference in last year’s election and whether Moscow collaborated with President Donald Trump’s campaign:

With Turkey’s Erdogan, Transactional Trump on Display
U.S. president talks deeper ties on trade, countering ISIS

President Donald Trump welcomes Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan outside the White House on Tuesday. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

By midafternoon Tuesday at the White House, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan had already spent several hours there in a visit largely overshadowed by Capitol Hill’s grappling with the consequences of President Donald Trump’s recent interactions with Russian officials.

The bilateral meeting between the two heads of state was mostly background music amid a new controversy White House officials scrambled to tamp down: Trump’s apparent disclosure of a classified Islamic State plot to Russian officials last week in the Oval Office. But when the two leaders appeared together, the U.S. president made clear he has no intention of distancing himself from a Middle Eastern leader many lawmakers and experts warn is a dictator-in-the-making.

Judges Again Wrestle With Trump’s Words on Travel Ban
Intent, statements and authority are the ‘nub’ of the case

Another federal appeals court considered Monday whether to let the Trump administration implement its revised travel ban, grappling with the president’s comments about his reasons for the executive order and whether courts should second-guess him on a national security issue.

The three judges on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit who heard the case in a Seattle courtroom didn’t clearly reveal whether they would side with President Donald Trump or the challengers during more than an hour of arguments carried live on television and the court’s live video stream.

How to Watch Trump’s Defense of Travel Ban on TV
Federal appeals court hearing arguments

Protesters greet international travelers at Dulles International Airport in Virginia on Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017. Protests erupted at airports around the country following President Trump’s first executive order restricting travel from several Islamic countries. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A second federal appeals court will hear arguments Monday over whether the Trump administration should be able to implement its revised travel ban, this time with an expected audience of millions watching via live video stream.

A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit hears one hour of arguments on the case starting at 12:30 p.m. ET in a Seattle courtroom. Interested viewers can tune in via the court's live stream or on C-SPAN's website.

Appeals Court Focuses on Trump’s Travel Ban Comments
Trump used phrases ‘Muslim ban’ and ‘we all know what that means’

Passengers from a Saudi Arabian Airlines flight from Jeddah are greeted by protesters as they arrive at Dulles International Airport in Virginia on Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017. Protests erupted at airports around the country following President Trump's executive order restricting travel from several predominantly Muslim countries. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

RICHMOND, Va. — A federal appeals court appeared ready Monday to deliver another legal setback to the administration’s revised travel ban based on whether it should use President Donald Trump’s own comments against him.

Trump’s statements on the campaign trail and as president were front and center as the full U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit heard more than two hours of arguments about whether the government should be able to implement key parts of an executive order that advocacy groups say unconstitutionally targets Muslims.

Listen: Appeals Court to Hear Travel Ban Arguments Today
All eyes on Richmond for court deliberation

Passengers from a Saudi Arabian Airlines flight from Jeddah are greeted by protesters as they arrive at Dulles International Airport in Virginia on Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017. Protests erupted at airports around the country following President Donald Trump's executive order restricting travel from several Islamic countries. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Pool)

Despite Campaign Pledges, Trump Plans Active Foreign Policy
Official: May trip signals America re-engaging in world affairs

President Donald Trump is seen through a window speaking on the phone with King of Saudi Arabia, Salman bin Abd al-Aziz Al Saud, in the Oval Office of the White House, January 29, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Trump’s coming swing through Saudi Arabia, Israel and the Vatican is a signal that the United States is moving away from “disengagement” in world affairs, a senior administration official said Thursday.

The official’s comment marks another change from Trump’s campaign rhetoric.