Iraq

Tenney’s Son Received a Surprise Call From Trump Before Deployment
Sen. David Perdue tipped off the president about deployment of lawmaker's son

Rep. Claudia Tenney’s son left for Iraq on Saturday. (Thomas McKinless/CQ Roll Call file photo)

New York GOP freshman Rep. Claudia Tenney’s son received a phone call from President Donald Trump before he deployed to Iraq on Saturday.

Before Marine Corps 1st Lt. Trey Cleary left for a six-month deployment, he was surprised to hear Trump’s voice on the other end of a Friday phone call, Syracuse.com reported.

Opinion: Trump Must Resist His Inner MacArthur on Korea
A miscalculation could be very costly

A propaganda mural painting outside the People’s Palace of Culture in Pyongyang, North Korea. The country has bedeviled American policymakers for nearly seven decades, Shapiro writes. (Feng Li/Getty Images file photo)

Melissa McCarthy ended her latest impersonation of Sean Spicer — delivered in Easter garb on “Saturday Night Live” — by offhandedly mentioning, “And, by the way, the president's probably going to bomb North Korea tonight.”

Beyond the incongruity of a presidential press secretary announcing impending war while wearing a bunny suit, what made this moment funny was its small glimmer of plausibility.

Corker Gets First Democratic Challenger for 2018
James Mackler is an Iraq veteran and Nashville attorney

Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., easily won re-election in 2012 with about two-thirds of the vote. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Nashville attorney and Iraq war veteran James Mackler is the first Democrat to announce a challenge to Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker for 2018.

Mackler told the Tennessean that he is “running to restore respect, honesty, and most importantly, integrity in Washington.”

Some World Leaders Posture, Others Lavishly Praise Trump
NATO’s Stoltenberg was businesslike, but Japan’s Abe was effusive

President Donald Trump greets Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe as he arrives at the White House on Feb. 10. Abe was effusive in his praise of the new president. (Mario Tama/Getty Images file photo)

Angela Merkel grimaced. Benjamin Netanyahu hung to his podium with a white-knuckle grip at Donald Trump’s every word. And Theresa May rejected Trump’s attempt to guide her down a White House colonnade ramp.

The German chancellor mostly played it cool during her first interaction with the new U.S. president, though she expressed confusion at one of his brash claims. The Israeli and British prime ministers each used their joint press conferences with Trump to try to box in the political neophyte.

Comstock Gets Second Challenger
Dan Helmer is West Point grad, Rhodes Scholar and decorated vet

Dan Helmer is a West Point graduate and a Rhodes Scholar who served in the Army in Iraq and Afghanistan. (Screenshot: DanHemner.com)

Virginia Rep. Barbara Comstock received a second Democratic challenger on Tuesday.

Dan Helmer, a 35-year U.S. Army veteran, entered the race but didn’t mention the incumbent in his campaign announcement.

Three Veterans Announce They’re Running for House as Democrats
Two of them are running in GOP-held districts that Hillary Clinton won

Air Force veteran Chrissy Houlahan, left, who served as cheif operating officer and chief financial officer for Springboard Collaborative, announced she's running against Rep. Ryan Costello in Pennsylvania (Courtesy Chrissy Houlahan for Congress)

Three military veterans are announcing Tuesday they’re running as Democrats against Republican incumbents.

In California's 50th Congressional District, retired Navy SEAL Josh Butner will challenge Republican Rep. Duncan Hunter.

Stop-Loss an Option for Air Force to Keep Departing Pilots
‘If I can’t put warheads on foreheads, then [ISIS] is winning’

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Matthew Bruch, an aerial photographer with 1st Combat Camera Squadron, takes a self portrait during a flight in an F-15D. (Matthew Bruch/U.S. Air Force)

Faced with pilots leaving the Air Force in droves for the airlines, top generals are considering the option of forcing some to stay in the service against their will, a senior Air Force general told CQ Roll Call. 

Gen. Carlton Everhart, chief of the Air Mobility Command, said in an interview that he and other senior Air Force generals will join Gen. David Goldfein, the service’s chief of staff, alongside representatives of the other armed services, in a meeting with U.S. airline executives May 18 at Andrews Air Force Base.

Analysis: Syria Strike Puts Trump’s Still-Young Presidency at Risk
Slide into deeper U.S. involvement could set up armed hostilities with Russia

The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Ross fires a Tomahawk missile as part of strikes on Syria ordered by President Trump on Thursday evening. (Petty Officer 3rd Class Robert S. Price/U.S. Navy)

By pounding a Syrian air base with nearly 60 cruise missiles, Donald Trump created for himself a number of political and foreign policy risks that threaten to alter his still-young presidency.

Just shy of his 80th day in office, the populist “America-first” president — should he entangle the United States into the complex Syrian conflict — could see his record-low approval ratings fall even further, while also finding himself in the same Middle East quicksand that his two predecessors found so stymying.

Congress Wants to Hear Trump’s Syria Policy — and Fast
Members say Trump needs to consult them before taking any more action

The top Democrats on Capitol Hill, Charles E. Schumer and Nancy Pelosi, both advocate a role for Congress in future actions in Syria by the Trump administration. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Members of Congress from both sides of the aisle say they are waiting to hear President Donald Trump’s plan for his next step in Syria.

Many lawmakers — including some of Trump’s most vocal critics — offered support in the immediate aftermath of the U.S. bombing of a Syrian airbase Thursday night. But they said Trump needs to consult Congress before he takes any more steps.

How Devin Nunes Got Where He Is Today
Networking, not expertise, got him the Intel gavel so many now want to take away

California Rep. Devin Nunes is facing criticism for gridlocking the House Intelligence Committee at a potentially historic point in history. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Any search for a single Republican capable of undermining not only his party’s efforts to project a modicum of independence from President Donald Trump, but also the House’s institutional standing in the world of global affairs oversight, would not normally focus on an alfalfa and dairy farmer turned congressman from California.

But such is the uniquely unsettled nature of Washington this spring that the open casting call for the most newly pilloried person at the Capitol this year is over after just 10 weeks, the role awarded by virtually unanimous consent to Devin Gerald Nunes.