Jason Chaffetz

Opinion: The GOP and White Evangelicals — A Forever Match?
Less than compassionate policies might be fraying ties

The rise of President Donald Trump has exposed a few cracks in the long-standing relationship between white evangelical Protestants and the Republican Party, Curtis writes. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images file photo)

Will a health care proposal that could toss “the least of these” off its rolls cause divisions between evangelicals uncomfortable with a close relationship with the Republican Party and those who feel just fine with the political association?

A shared anti-abortion stance, with the promise to appoint like-minded judges, has so far helped to keep the link between evangelicals and the GOP strong. But strains — along policy, generational, and racial lines — are showing within conservative faith groups, despite agreement on core beliefs. 

Chaffetz Uses Rosie O’Donnell for Fundraising
Appeal comes after actress and comedian says she has ‘maxed out’ donations to potential challenger

Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, said in a fundraising email that he needed supporters to fight back against Rosie O’Donnell “and her liberal followers.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Jason Chaffetz is taking a page from President Donald Trump and using Rosie O’Donnell to help him raise money.

In a campaign fundraising email sent out Monday, Chaffetz said liberals are trying to make him their latest target.

Ethics Watchdog Pushes Back on White House View of Rules
OGE faults administration for not taking action against Kellyanne Conway

White House counselor Kellyanne Conway’s comments on Fox News last month encouraging viewers to buy Ivanka Trump-branded products drew strong criticism from the Office for Government Ethics. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A top government ethics official told lawmakers Thursday that he was troubled by the Trump White House’s interpretation of ethics laws.

Walter M. Shaub Jr., who runs the Office of Government Ethics, said he remained concerned about comments last month by Kellyanne Conway, a counselor to President Donald Trump, encouraging Fox News viewers to purchase Ivanka Trump-branded products after some retailers announced they were discontinuing the presidential daughter’s line.

Why Some House Republicans Could be Taking a Risk on Obamacare Repeal
The 11 GOP members who have the most constituents on Obamacare

These 11 members of Congress represent the Republican districts with the greatest percentage of constituents enrolled in government insurance exchanges. They are (clockwise from upper left): Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, R-Fla., Carlos Curbelo, R-Fla., Mario Diaz-Balart, R-Fla., Brian Mast, R-Fla., Francis Rooney, R-Fla., Vern Buchanan, R-Fla., Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, Gus Bilirakis, R-Fla., Bill Posey, R-Fla., Ron DeSantis, R-Fla., Rob Woodall, R-Ga.

As House Republicans rolled out their plan to replace the Affordable Care Act this week, some members of the conference found themselves stuck between their constituents and their colleagues.

Eleven House Republicans, who will be expected by party leadership and the White House to support their party’s replacement plan, represent districts where at least 6 percent of their constituents are enrolled in government insurance exchanges set up by the 2010 health care law, according to a CQ Roll Call analysis of Kaiser Family Health Foundation and Census Bureau data. 

Analysis: How Rank-and-File Republicans Overruled Trump on Sessions Recusal
Leaders provided cover, but other GOP members forced AG to stand down

Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley had some discreet advice for his former Senate colleague, Attorney General Jeff Sessions. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

On “The Apprentice,” Donald Trump told winning contestants, “You’re hired.” But it was congressional Republican lawmakers who overruled the new president and told Attorney General Jeff Sessions, “You’re relieved.” 

As pressure mounted on Sessions over his campaign-season meetings with Russia’s ambassador to Washington, Sergey Kislyak, the president expressed his “total” confidence in the former Alabama senator. Republican leaders provided Sessions cover. But Trump’s view was not enough to keep Sessions involved in any Justice Department investigation involving Trump’s campaign and its contacts with Russian officials.

Sessions Recuses Himself From Russia Investigation
AG’s move follows Republican recusal calls, Democrats say he should resign

Attorney General Jeff Sessions takes questions during a news conference on Thursday after he announced he would recuse himself from investigations into ties between President Donald Trump’s campaign and Russian entities. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Updated 5:03 p.m. | Attorney General Jeff Sessions will recuse himself from any investigation into ties between President Donald Trump’s campaign and Russian officials, he said Thursday.

The attorney general had been dogged all day by calls from some Republicans to step aside from any inquiry — and from Democrats for him to resign — following reports that he had met with Russia’s ambassador to the U.S. last year, despite saying he had not in his confirmation hearings.

Word on the Hill: Congressional Dinner
Television safeguard awards and singer and athlete in D.C.

MSNBC host Greta Van Susteren will emcee Wednesday night’s Congressional Correspondents Dinner. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The day after President Donald Trump, an outspoken critic of the media, gave his joint session address to Congress, members of Congress and the media are getting together.

The annual Congressional Correspondents Dinner is tonight, when the media invites sources and politicians to be their guests for the event.

The Joint Session in Photos: Trump’s First Address to Congress
The night of Feb. 28 as seen by Roll Call's photographers

Trump shakes hands with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., after delivering his address. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By BILL CLARK and TOM WILLIAMS CQ Roll Call

President Donald Trump made the drive down Pennsylvania Avenue to give his first address to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday. The speech lasted about an hour but Capitol Hill was abuzz well before and after. 

With No Vote in Congress, D.C. Residents Find Power in Cash
District voters are supporting Jason Chaffetz’s challenger in Utah

Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz is fast becoming a target of Washington, D.C., residents, upset about his efforts to overturn local laws. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It was only the second political contribution Sarah Carr had made in her life. A $100 gift to an obscure politician from a distant state whose values hardly align with her own.

But Carr, a 41-year-old marine scientist who lives on Capitol Hill, had a clear goal: she wanted to support anyone who might oust Utah Republican Rep. Jason Chaffetz.