Jeanne Shaheen

Three Celebrities on Capitol Hill for Three Reasons
Rob Thomas, Billy Hurley III and Huw Collins on why they came to D.C.

Athletes Billy Hurley III, left, and Dan Jansen, right, at a National Golf Day event in the Rayburn House Office Building. (Courtesy WE ARE GOLF)

This week on Capitol Hill, a musician, an athlete, and an actor came out to lobby for causes specifically important to them.

Singer Rob Thomas came to discuss the challenges facing songwriters and federal regulations on licensing and was joined by other singers including Peter Frampton.

Senate Democrats Look to Make Their Mark on Foreign Policy
With Obama no longer in the White House, minority party is stepping up

Maryland Sen. Benjamin L. Cardinsays there’s no shortage of foreign policy leaders among Senate Democrats. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Senate Democrats are not shying away from criticizing the Trump administration when it comes to foreign policy.

It’s a new and potentially adversarial role: being in the minority while explosive headlines from conflicts abroad dominate the news.

Warren and Shaheen Support Scott Brown for Ambassador
Senators who defeated him in 2012 and 2014

Former Sen. Scott Brown, R-Mass., was nominated by President Donald Trump to be U.S. Ambassador to New Zealand. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown has the support of both senators who beat him at the ballot box as he seeks to be the U.S. ambassador to New Zealand.

President Donald Trump announced he was nominating Brown for the post on Thursday. Brown was an early backer of Trump.

Playing Chicken With Trump’s Tax Returns
Saturday tax marches protest president’s refusal to release filings

Democrats and liberal advocates plan to use the annual tax filing deadline as a showcase to demand the release of President Donald Trump’s tax returns and to call for more electronic tax filing, as Republicans focus on a legislative overhaul.

Senators Look to Supreme Court Nuclear Winter
With rule change seemingly inevitable, senators look to what’s next

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Judge Neil Gorsuch will be confirmed to the Supreme Court, one way or another. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate Republicans’ deployment of the “nuclear option” to change the chamber’s rules and confirm President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee is so inevitable that senators are already moving on to the next debate.

“We’re on this spiral downward, and obviously, the next thing to go likely the next time there’s a big issue that comes up legislatively will be the legislative filibuster,” Sen. Bob Corker said Tuesday.

Democrats Back #LetLizSpeak Campaign
Warren's colleagues show they can use Twitter, too

Democrats like Schumer have joined in on Twitter’s #LetLizSpeak campaign to protest Republicans’ shutting down Warren’s speech about Sessions. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats are taking up the #LetLizSpeak Twitter campaign backing Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren for her floor speech against attorney general nominee Sen. Jeff Sessions that Republicans cut off Tuesday night. 

Warren was reading a letter the late Coretta Scott King wrote to the Senate Judiciary Committee in 1986 opposing Sessions’ confirmation to be a federal district court judge as well as quoting statements from the late Sen. Edward Kennedy from that time. King’s letter said, among other thing, “Sessions has used the awesome powers of his office in a shabby attempt to intimidate and frighten elderly black voters.”

Take Five: Maggie Hassan
New Hampshire Democrat took up crossword puzzles while campaigning

New Hampshire Sen. Maggie Hassan previously served two terms as governor was governor. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Freshman Democratic Sen. Maggie Hassan of New Hampshire, who gave her maiden floor speech on Monday, talks to HOH about playing rugby, her son, and the greatest quarterback of all time.

Q: As a New Englander and someone who was born in Boston, what were your emotions when the Patriots and Falcons went into overtime at the Super Bowl last Sunday night?

Neil Gorsuch Nominated by Trump for U.S. Supreme Court
10th Circuit judge lauded by president for his ‘extraordinary résumé’

President Donald Trump nominated Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House January 31, 2017 in Washington, DC. If confirmed, Gorsuch would fill the seat left vacant with the death of Associate Justice Antonin Scalia in February 2016. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Tuesday announced his nomination of U.S. Circuit Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court, setting up a confirmation showdown with Senate Democrats still upset over how Republicans blocked the last pick. 

In a prime-time event broadcast from the East Room of the White House, Trump touted Gorsuch as among the finest and most brilliant legal minds in the country — and a fulfillment of his campaign promise to find the best judge in the country to replace the late Justice Antonin Scalia.

Word on the Hill: Liberty and Justice for Hurt
Speaker of the House has a birthday

Former Virginia Rep. Robert Hurt, center, is shown with Shawn Akers, left, dean of Liberty University’s Helms School of Government, and B. Keith Faulkner, dean of the Liberty University School of Law. (Courtesy Liberty University)

Former Rep. Robert Hurt, R-Va., will head Liberty University’s new Center for Law & Government, which the school says aims to influence public policy and spread conservative ideals.

“I could not be more thrilled to be a part of this project,” said Hunt, who represented Virginia’s 5th District from 2011 to 2017. “I think this is an excellent opportunity for Liberty University to be a part of the policy-making process in a way that other places cannot.”

Trump’s First Memos Set Up Conflict With GOP
McCain calls TPP withdrawal a ‘serious mistake’ that will benefit China

Donald Trump and his wife, Melania, are greeted by President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama upon arriving at the White House on Inauguration Day. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Monday signed several memoranda that begin rolling back his predecessor’s legacy, including one withdrawing the United States from a massive Asian-Pacific trade pact. It also sets up a conflict with congressional Republicans on policy priorities.

Trump, before taking office, said Monday would be his administration’s first full day of work. His signature essentially makes good on a campaign promise to withdraw from former President Barack Obama’s Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal “on Day One.” During the campaign, candidate Trump had dubbed the TPP “a potential disaster for our country.”