John Boozman

Word on the Hill: Dine With the Presidents
Cummings sends off grads, and honoring veterans

“Dads of Democracy.” (Courtesy District Winery)

This weekend, why not eat with all the presidents watching you? District Winery’s new restaurant, Ana, has unique artwork in its dining area featuring 44 presidents.

Ana is located in Navy Yard on Water Street SE.

Sen. Boozman to Have Follow-Up Heart Surgery
Change in August recess delayed operation

Sen. John Boozman underwent emergency heart surgery in 2014 to fix a torn aorta. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. John Boozman was scheduled to have a follow-up heart operation during the first week of August. That all changed when the Senate pushed back the start of August recess.

Now the Arkansas Republican is set to have the procedure in northern Virginia Tuesday, the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reported.

Photos of the Day: Health Care Protests Erupt Across Capitol Hill
Monday saw approximately 80 arrests, according to Capitol Police

Health care protesters from Arkansas chant outside of the office of Sen. John Boozman, R-Ark., in the Hart Senate Office Building on Monday. About a dozen people loudly voiced opposition to the GOP health care bill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate returned from recess Monday and was greeted by protesters who oppose the GOP plan to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law.

Throughout the handful of House and Senate office buildings on Capitol Hill, protesters began demonstrating around 2 p.m. Monday, according to a statement by the United States Capitol Police. As of 4:30 p.m., 80 protesters had been arrested after they “refused to cease and desist” from “unlawful demonstration activities.”

A Day That’s Both Routinized and Indelibly the President’s Own
Trump’s populist tone, churlish crowd, combine with ageless Capitol pomp

From left, First lady Melania Trump, President Donald Trump, Major General Bradley Becker, Vice President Mike Pence and his wife Karen Pence review the troops following Donald Trump’s swearing-in as the 45th president of the United States on Friday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

If inaugurations are like weddings — the central figures remain singular and the emotional sensibilities vary, but the liturgies are similar and the outcome is always the same — then the opening day of Donald Trump’s presidency absolutely kept the metaphor relevant.

On Friday, he became the only billionaire, the only brand personification and the only person without any prior experience as a public servant to take the oath of office. And then he excoriated the capital establishment arrayed around him using caustic language and campaign-rally cadences particularly discordant for an inaugural address.

Photos of the Week: Biden's Senate Farewell, Camels at the High Court and the Sun Sets on the 114th
The week of Dec. 5 as captured by Roll Call's photographers

Rep. Tim Huelskamp, R-Kan., was the first member of Congress down the House steps following the final House vote of this session of Congress on Thursday. The House passed a spending bill to fund the government through April before heading home for the holiday recess. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The business of the 114th Congress is coming to a close. Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. of Delaware, who served in the Senate for 36 years, visited the Hill several times including to preside over a health care vote. A live nativity took place in front of the Supreme Court complete with camels. And Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada saw the unveiling of his portrait, which prompted the first Hill appearance by Hillary Clinton following the election.

Word on the Hill: The Mystery of Mulvaney’s Missing Desk
A senator hits the big 5-0, and giving blood, sweat, and tears … and blood

Rep. Mick Mulvaney, left, thought fellow South Carolina Rep. Trey Gowdy, right, might have hidden his desk. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Mick Mulvaney, R-S.C., thought he might have been punked by one of his colleagues after his desk went missing while his office was being moved.

Mulvaney was moving offices as part of the relocating that takes place with a new Congress, but realized his desk wasn’t where it was supposed to be. He said members were told they didn’t have to pack the contents of their desks, so all of his stuff is missing, too.

Ted Cruz is Really, Really Passionate About Cheese
Queso is a ‘visceral, emotional, powerful family bond’

Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, R-Texas, right, and Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, sample Arkansas cheese dip and Texas queso during a contest in the Capitol between the two states. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

When it comes Texas queso, Sen. Ted Cruz will go to great lengths to defend his state.

“Queso is made to be scooped up with tortilla chips, dribbling down your chin,” he said in his passionate plea to prove in a press scrum that Texas queso is better than Arkansas cheese dip. “It just tastes good, it speaks to the soul. Good queso relaxes you.”

Spinal Cord Injury Advocates Roll on Capitol Hill
Senators honored at fifth annual Roll on Capitol Hill hosted by the United Spinal Association

Sen. Mazie Hirono urged the association to start a chapter in Hawaii. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Dozens of wheelchair users came to the Capitol on Tuesday to celebrate their supporters in the Senate and lobby for more like them.  

At the fifth annual Roll on Capitol Hill, hosted by the United Spinal Association, those with spinal cord injuries and clinicians who care for them raised awareness for their community.  

Arkansas Democrat Talks Long Shot Bid for Senate
Conner Eldridge is an underdog in his matchup with incumbent John Boozman

Connor Eldridge, Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate in Arkansas. (Meredith Dake-O'Connor/CQ Roll Call)

Less than two years ago, Arkansas voters dealt former Democratic Sen. Mark Pryor a humiliating defeat, giving him under 40 percent of the vote in his bid for re-election.  

Most analysts took the result as evidence that Democrats could no longer win statewide federal races in Arkansas — but Conner Eldridge didn't see it that way. The state’s new candidate for Senate says voters during the midterm election were angrier at incumbents than they were at Democrats, a dynamic he thinks his campaign can take advantage of in November when he faces GOP Sen. John Boozman.  

Meetings but no Movement on Garland Nomination
2 more Republicans to meet with Obama court pick, but no hearings, vote expected

Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland, left, met Tuesday with Republican Sen. Mark S. Kirk, who is in a tough re-election race in Illinois. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As the Senate returns from its two-week recess, Republicans face growing pressure to change their position on refusing to take up President Barack Obama's nomination of Merrick Garland to fill the late Antonin Scalia's seat on the Supreme Court, particularly after two decisions on the evenly divided court went against them.

Last week, a deadlocked Supreme Court handed a win to public sector unions , staying a lower court decision that ruled unions could collect dues from employees who were not members of the unions.