John Delaney

Rep. Elizabeth Esty Won’t Seek Re-Election in Wake of Abusive Staffer Disclosures
Connecticut Democrat’s decision opens up potentially competitive seat

Rep. Elizabeth Esty, D-Conn., says she will retire at the end of this term amid reports of her questionable handling of a former chief of staff who battered, threatened, and sexually harassed a subordinate. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Embattled Rep. Elizabeth Esty has decided not to run for re-election, she announced via Facebook on Monday.

The Connecticut Democrat faced bipartisan criticism over the weekend after multiple news outlets reported her questionable handling of a former top aide who battered, threatened, and sexually harassed a female employee in her office.

Supreme Court Grapples With Partisan Gerrymandering Once Again
Maryland case was second of three redistricting cases before justices this term

Anti-gerrymandering activists gather on the steps of the Supreme Court as it prepares to hear a case Wednesday that challenged the drawing of a Maryland congressional district. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Supreme Court justices gave no clear indication Wednesday that they knew how to rule in key cases about partisan gerrymandering, with one justice pitching a sort of group argument to settle the various challenges on the issue from three states.

In oral arguments in a case from Maryland, several justices said facts about how Democratic lawmakers redrew the 6th District in 2011 — which swung it from a solid Republican to a Democratic seat in the next three elections — seemed to violate the Constitution.

Supreme Court to Hear Second Case on Partisan Gerrymandering
This time Democrat-drawn map in Maryland is at issue

Maryland Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett’s defeat in 2012 after the state’s Democrats redrew lines for his 6th District is at the heart of Wednesday’s redistricting case before the Supreme Court. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Supreme Court hears oral arguments Wednesday in a second key case about partisan gerrymandering, this time focusing on the way Maryland redrew a congressional district to swing it from a Republican to a Democratic seat.

The justices already heard arguments in October in a case out of Wisconsin about whether a state’s political maps can be challenged on the basis that they entrench a benefit to one political party over another. The court has never allowed such a challenge but has not ruled it out either.

Wealth of Congress: Richer Than Ever, but Mostly at the Very Top
Collectively, their gains have outpaced the market, net worth is five times U.S. median

Lawmakers are richer than ever — and their wealth has outpaced most voters and the markets. (Illustration by Cristina Byvik)

The people’s representatives just keep getting richer, and doing so faster than the people represented.

The cumulative net worth of senators and House members jumped by one-fifth in the two years before the start of this Congress, outperforming the typical American’s improved fortunes as well as the solid performance of investment markets during that time.

What Former Congresswomen Learned From Running
Edwards: ‘Women have to stop waiting to be asked and just step up and do it’

Left to right, Nydia Velazquez, Eva Clayton, Carolyn Maloney and Barbara Kennelly are seen at a reception for new women members at freshman orientation in 1992. (Laura Patterson/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Since Donald Trump’s presidential campaign and election, there has been a major push to get more women to run for Congress. And it’s paid off — the number of women who have filed for or are planning to run for office is at an all-time high, according to a study from Rutgers University’s Center for American Women and Politics.

Some women who served in Congress want those political hopefuls to know exactly what they’re in for.

Supreme Court to Hear Maryland Gerrymandering Case
Republican voters are challenging 6th District lines drawn by Democrats

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear a challenge to Maryland’s 6th District lines. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Supreme Court late Friday agreed to hear a challenge to the lines of a Maryland congressional district that were drawn by Democrats.  

The court has already heard a partisan gerrymandering case from Wisconsin, where Republicans drew the state legislative map. 

Presidential Hopeful Delaney, Polling at Zero, Banks On CEO Past
The Maryland Democrat acknowledges he is not ”well-known,” but points to business experience

Maryland Democratic Rep. John Delaney arrives for votes at the Capitol on Oct. 26. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

When Rep. John Delaney of Maryland said he was going to make an announcement about his political future in late July, most expected him to decide between running for re-election for his seat or running for governor.

But the Democrat, now in his third term, shocked everyone when he announced that he would be running for president of the United States. Perhaps unsurprisingly, Delaney is lagging behind other big-name potential candidates. In a poll released by the University of New Hampshire Oct. 18, he garnered zero percent, placing him dead last among 12 names, behind “Other” at 5 percent.

Does Iowa Still Matter to Democrats?
Democrats in Iowa and other rural states worry the national party will abandon them

Massachusetts Rep. Seth Moulton speaks during the Polk County Democrats’ Steak Fry in Des Moines, Iowa, on Sept. 30. (Charlie Neibergal/AP file photo)

DES MOINES, Iowa — As Democrats try to find a way to win back the White House and control of Congress, party members in Iowa and other rural states are worried about being abandoned by the national party.

Iowa Democratic Party Chairman Troy Price was in Las Vegas last week for the Democratic National Committee’s fall meeting and said Democrats cannot take Midwestern states like Iowa for granted.

Opinion: Stuck on the Back Bench? Why Not Run for President
Last House member to win presidency was in 1880 — it was an accident

An engraving of President James A. Garfield’s assassination. Not since Garfield has a sitting House member so much as won an electoral vote in a presidential election. (Engraving from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper)

No sitting House member has won an electoral vote for president since 1880, when Ohio’s James A. Garfield captured the White House — and he didn’t even mean to run for the job.

In fact, the Ohio legislature had just voted to appoint Garfield to a Senate term — for which he would have been seated in March 1881 — when the GOP met in Chicago to pick its nominee for the presidency in the summer of 1880.

John Delaney Running for President in 2020
Maryland Democrat won't seek re-election to House

The field to replace Maryland Rep. John Delaney in 2018 is already crowded. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Maryland Democratic Rep. John Delaney announced Friday afternoon he’s running for president in 2020. He won’t run for re-election or for governor in 2018.