John McCain

Word on the Hill: Focus on Girls
March Ratness and March Madness

Girl Scouts will be on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A briefing entitled “Creating Opportunities for Girls to Thrive and Learn” is taking place on Capitol Hill today. It’s co-sponsored by Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine and Reps. Susan W. Brooks, R-Ind., and Bonnie Watson Coleman, D-N.J.

The event is hosted by Girls Inc., YWCA USA, and Girl Scouts of the USA. The groups hope to create a series of briefings focused on issues facing girls and young women.

The Snapchat Senators
Daines, Murphy, Booker and McCain talk about the social mobile app

Montana Sen. Steve Daines Snapchats in Statuary Hall before President Donald Trump’s address to a joint session of Congress on Feb. 28. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Snapchat was initially established in 2011 and within the last year or so, a few senators have jumped on the social messaging app popular with millennials.

The lawmakers usually send multimedia messages, or snaps, themselves — as opposed to having their staffers do it — and they get pretty creative with what they send to followers.

Nuclear Option Looms as Supreme Court Hearings Wrap Up
Senators ready to blame opposing party for any upending of Senate rules

Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch testifies on the second day of his Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

With Judge Neil Gorsuch’s Supreme Court confirmation hearings wrapping up, senators will soon confront whether his nomination will upend Senate rules.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has not yet said  whether he would move to change Senate rules that currently require 60 votes to end debate on Gorsuch’s nomination. If eight members of the Democratic caucus do not join the 52 Republicans to move the nomination forward, McConnell could move to change the rules, lowering the threshold to a simple majority.

Full-Year CR Threatens Military Training, Hawks Say
Thornberry: “All but one deploying Army unit will cease training after July 15th”

House Armed Services Chairman Mac Thornberry, R-Texas, participates in House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy's media availability with the Chairman's Task Force on Counterterrorism and Homeland Security in the Capitol on Thursday, Dec. 3, 2015. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The U.S. armed forces will see training severely curtailed if the continuing resolution funding the federal government is extended for the rest of the fiscal year, a leading lawmaker warned Wednesday.

Texas Republican Mac Thornberry, chairman of House Armed Services, said at a press breakfast that he has asked the military services what the effect would be of a full-year CR. He said he had not heard from all of them but offered a few startling examples.

Trump Defense Boost Would Mean Big Gains for Some States
Democrats likely to hold line for parity with nondefense programs

Brian Schatz, whose state of Hawaii is the No. 3 recipient of per-capita defense spending, says there must be parity in domestic spending to go with any boost to national security programs. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A request from the Trump administration for a double-digit increase in defense spending could be largely decided by lawmakers whose states are far from equal players when it comes to the benefits of a bigger military budget.

That’s long been the case, as geographic, historic and strategic differences across the country result in more of an economic boost in certain states. But the differences are even more starkly displayed in a new Pew Charitable Trusts analysis that shows the funding split across all 50 states and the District of Columbia on a per-capita basis.

Who Could Replace Ohio Rep. Jim Renacci in Congress?
Four-term congressman is running for governor in 2018

Ohio Rep. James B. Renacci announced Monday he’s running for governor in 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Ohio Rep. James B. Renacci is running for governor in 2018 and will leave behind a Republican seat in the 16th District. 

The four-term congressman made the announcement Monday morning in an introductory video playing up his business credentials and touting himself as an outsider in the mold of President Donald Trump, whom he backed during last year’s election.  

A Seminal Day in Trump’s Still-Young Presidency
Budget blueprint set to be released on same day as key health care vote

President Donald Trump faces one of the most consequential days of his presidency so far on Thursday. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images file photo)

An amped-up Mick Mulvaney on Wednesday stood at a White House podium, speaking quickly and unsure of what day it was. The new Office of Management and Budget chief’s demeanor, in many ways, was a fitting symbol of a frenetic presidency that faces major tests Thursday.

Outside the Beltway, President Donald Trump rallied his base Wednesday in Tennessee’s “Music City” and called for a “new Industrial Revolution” in Michigan’s “Motor City.” Those vibes give way Thursday a possible turning point in his 55-day-old presidency.

Word on the Hill: D.C. and Guns
Save the date for Dine Out Day

Cherry blossoms were covered with ice on the East Front of the Capitol after snow and freezing rain fell over the region on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

With gun sales on the decline in the U.S. since President Donald Trump took office, WalletHub conducted a study to find out which states were the most dependent on the gun industry.

The District of Columbia topped the list for highest average wages and benefits in the firearms industry at $348,325. That’s more than 10 times higher than New Mexico, which came in last at $34,232.

Word on the Hill: Cortez Masto and Latina Staffers
Tea party rally and award for Biden

Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto, center, front row, and the staffers. (Courtesy Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto's office)

Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto, D-Nev., met with Latina Senate staffers on Monday for a roundtable discussion on the importance of women and students of color getting access to internships and employment opportunities on Capitol Hill.

They also discussed obstacles women face in a Senate office and brainstormed other ways to address issues pertaining to a lack of diversity.

GOP Grapples With Path Forward for Health Care Plan
Some senators are clamoring for changes to the House bill

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, center, says his chamber will consider whatever the House comes up with on health care. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Republicans grappled Tuesday with how to advance their health care proposal following a report from the Congressional Budget Office that the plan would dramatically increase the number of uninsured Americans.

House lawmakers had more time to digest the report thanks to a winter storm that delayed their schedule. But senators trudged through the slush and snow to the Capitol, where they faced questions about the CBO report that said the GOP plan would lead to 24 million more people uninsured by 2026, and reduce the deficit by $337 billion over 10 years.