John Shimkus

Photos of the Week: House in While Senate's Out, Congressional Football and a Wharf
The week of Oct. 10 as captured by Roll Call's photographers

Rep. John Shimkus, R-Ill., holds up bunny ear fingers behind a a technician testing the microphones before the start of the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Thursday. (Bill Clark/Roll Call)

The House was the only chamber in session this week in Washington. The lawmakers headed out of town Thursday for their own recess. The Senate returns next week. 

The congressional football team played a game against Capitol police officers this week while D.C. leaders christened a new wharf in town. 

Five Top Energy and Environment Priorities as Congress Returns
Energy bill, drinking water, Yucca, nominations and WOTUS

Washington’s Maria Cantwell, left, and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska are eager to advance their bipartisan energy bill. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

With lawmakers returning to kick off the fall working session, energy and environment policies won’t be high on their to-do list, but their champions aim to fill any floor schedule gaps with measures that could provide some legislative accomplishments.

Here are five priorities they will push this fall:

House Passes Delay for EPA's Obama-era Ozone Standards

Rep. John Shimkus said the legislation was a needed change to the previous administration's ozone pollution standards. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The House on Tuesday passed, 229-199, a bill to delay the compliance date for Obama-era ground level ozone standards.

The measure (HR 806) now heads to the Senate, where its fortunes do not appear as clear after Senate Democrats expressed strong opposition to similar language appearing in legislation before the Environment and Public Works Committee.

By the Numbers: Richmond, DeSantis, Others Pad Their Baseball Resumes
Both sides had standout performers at the Congressional Baseball Game

Louisiana Democratic Rep. Cedric L. Richmond pitches during the 56th annual Roll Call Congressional Baseball Game at Nationals Park in Washington on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

When the usually lighthearted run-up to the annual Roll Call Congressional Baseball Game was marred by a horrific shooting at the Republican practice session last week, Capitol Hill came together for an emotional night of bipartisanship and baseball. But one thing it did not do was make the players go easy on one another.

“I did tell [Republican manager Texas Rep. Joe L. Barton] that I love him before the game, and I love him after the game, but during the game, we’re going to play to win,” Pennsylvania Rep. Mike Doyle, the Democratic manager, quipped at a pre-game press conference. With the coveted Roll Call Trophy on the line, that was exactly what they did, defeating the Republican squad, 11-2. Despite the lopsided score, though, there were standout individual performances on both sides.

Democrats Down Republicans, Both Down the Rhetoric
Emotional evening at Congressional Baseball Game

Steve Scalise fans waves signs before the start of the annual Congressional Baseball Game at Nationals Park in Washington on Thursday, June 15, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

When winning Democratic manager Rep. Mike Doyle gave the Congressional Baseball Game trophy to his counterpart, Rep. Joe L. Barton, to put in Rep. Steve Scalise’s office while he is recovering, it summed up the feeling of the evening.

“It’s so awesome to show everyone that we actually get along and I want that to be the message that everyone takes away tonight,” Illinois Rep. Rodney Davis said after the game.

Partisanship Shut Out at Congressional Baseball Game
Unity a big winner after gunman had disrupted GOP practice

During player introductions, Texas Rep. Roger Williams shakes hands with California Rep. Nanette Barragán as, from right, Reps. Mike Doyle of Pennsylvania, Joe L. Barton of Texas and Pete Aguilar of California look on during the Congressional Baseball Game in Nationals Park on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated June 19, 2017, 1:58 p.m. | The final moments of the 56th annual Roll Call Congressional Baseball Game at Nationals Park on Thursday perfectly demonstrated the event’s purpose — finding unity amid heated competition.

Though the Democrats overwhelmingly beat the Republicans 11-2, that final score was eclipsed during the trophy presentation at the end of the night.

Democrats Reclaim Congressional Baseball Title, Bipartisanship Rules
Night ends with gracious hand-over of trophy

California Rep. Jimmy Panetta slides in safe at home as GOP catcher Rep. Rodney Davis of Illinois tries to apply the tag during the the 56th annual Congressional Baseball Game at Nationals Park in Washington on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Democrats regained their mojo on Thursday night at Nationals Park with a commanding 11-2 victory over the Republicans at the 56th annual Congressional Baseball Game.

But with the tragic shooting during the Republicans’ team practice the day before, esprit de corps was the main game plan for both teams, dispelling for at least a night, the clouds of highly charged partisanship that has plagued both sides of the aisle this year.

Shooting Victims Come from All Walks of Hill Life
Majority whip among those injured at Republican baseball team practice

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise was shot Wednesday morning at a Republican congressional baseball team practice. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

A member of congressional leadership, two members of his security detail, a young Hill staffer and a lobbyist — a microcosm of the often hierarchical but interconnected life on Capitol Hill — were all injured at Wednesday morning’s GOP baseball team practice.

The shooting of Majority Whip Steve Scalise, as a member of House leadership, has garnered the most attention.

Members Thrilled That Congress Will Still Play Ball
Paul Ryan took the managers’ suggestions to hold the game

Reps. Chuck Fleischmann of Tennessee, right, and Rodney Davis of Illinois tell reporters about the shooting at the Republican's baseball practice in Alexandria, Va., on Wednesday after the congressmen arrived at the Capitol. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Players in Thursday’s Congressional Baseball Game say they’ve already gotten a win in the decision to play the game as scheduled, after Wednesday’s shooting at the Republican team’s practice in Alexandria, Virginia.

“We’re going to play, we need to play,” said Texas Rep. Roger Williams, one of the Republican coaches, who was present at the practice and injured his ankle as players scrambled for cover. His staffer Zack Barth was wounded in the attack.

Scalise, Shot at Baseball Practice, Known as Behind-the-Scenes Mover
Republican Whip has been credited with moving signature bills, working with Trump

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, right, celebrates the Republicans’ win in last year’s Congressional Baseball Game with Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

On the Hill, Rep. Steve Scalise works behind the scenes to convince other Republicans to line up behind his Party’s agenda.

But on the baseball field during the annual Congressional game, he plays up the middle: He’s the second baseman.