Kevin McCarthy

House GOP Undecided on Spending Path
Speaker says Republicans still having ‘family conversation’

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., says Republicans are still at the 'family conversation' level of figuring out the appropriations process. Also appearing are, from left, Reps. Carlos Curbelo, R-Fla., House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., and Glenn Thompson, R-Pa.. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

With a little more than seven legislative weeks before the end of the fiscal year on Sept. 30, House Republicans still do not have a consensus on the process for funding the government, fueling some discontent in the conference. 

“We haven’t decided exactly how we’re going to go about our appropriations process in this first year, but we’re going to move together on consensus,” Speaker Paul D. Ryan told reporters after the Republican conference met Wednesday morning.

McHenry, Scalise’s Deputy, Steps Up to Run GOP Whip Operation
A temporary but open-ended promotion

Megan Bel Miller, chief of staff for the personal office of House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., takes a selfie with Rep. Patrick T. McHenry, R-N.C., during a blood drive in the foyer of Rayburn Building on June 20, 2017. The drive was held to honor those injured in last week's shooting at the Republican team practice in Alexandria. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As members flew back to town for the first time since the baseball practice shooting, the House’s No. 3 Republican remained absent indefinitely, and his leadership post was already being occupied temporarily.

The trauma to the Capitol from the grievous wounding of Steve Scalise, who’s set to remain hospitalized into the July Fourth recess and may not return to work before Labor Day, was not reaching in any visible way into the workings of his majority whip operation.

It’s Election Day in the Most Expensive House Race Ever
Both sides in Georgia special election working to turn out Tuesday vote

Jon Ossoff, Democratic candidate for Georgia’s 6th Congressional district, shakes hands with campaign workers and volunteers at his campaign office in Chamblee, Ga., on Sunday. Ossoff is facing off against Republican Karen Handel in the special election to fill the seat vacated by current HHS Secretary Tom Price on Tuesday. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

SANDY SPRINGS, Ga. — It’s finally here. Voters go to the polls Tuesday in the most expensive House race in the country. 

In the final hours of the special election campaign in Georgia’s 6th District, both Republican Karen Handel and Democrat Jon Ossoff are sticking to a variation of the same talking point: “It’s all about turnout.” 

Another Congressional Baseball Event for D.C. Kids
Horton’s Kids raises funds for children in at-risk neighborhood

The batting cages are open for Home Runs for Horton’s Kids. (Courtesy Horton’s Kids)

Members of Congress are coming together at Nationals Park again, this time to support the city they work in.

The ninth annual Home Runs for Horton’s Kids to raise money for the nonprofit founded by a onetime Capitol Hill staffer is Wednesday. Horton’s Kids helps children in grades K-12 living in Washington’s most at-risk neighborhoods through educational and other social programs.

For Members, a Personal Connection to Capitol Police

Rep. Roger Williams, left, was one of many Republicans at the baseball practice shooting praising the life-saving efforts of Capitol Police. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

When Rep. Roger Williams returned to the Capitol on Wednesday, visibly shaken and on crutches following the shooting at the Republicans' congressional baseball practice that morning, the first thing he addressed was the response of Capitol Police officers on site.

“My family and I will be forever grateful,” Williams said.

Democrats Down Republicans, Both Down the Rhetoric
Emotional evening at Congressional Baseball Game

Steve Scalise fans waves signs before the start of the annual Congressional Baseball Game at Nationals Park in Washington on Thursday, June 15, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

When winning Democratic manager Rep. Mike Doyle gave the Congressional Baseball Game trophy to his counterpart, Rep. Joe L. Barton, to put in Rep. Steve Scalise’s office while he is recovering, it summed up the feeling of the evening.

“It’s so awesome to show everyone that we actually get along and I want that to be the message that everyone takes away tonight,” Illinois Rep. Rodney Davis said after the game.

Congressional Security Details Remain Murky
‘Over the past two and a half years, I’ve built a special bond with each of them’

A Capitol Police officer keeps an eye on the Republicans’ baseball practice from the dugout at Four Mile Run Park in Alexandria, Va., in June 2015. (Bill Clark/Roll Call file photo)

The special agents who protect congressional leaders are a constant, anomalous presence in the Capitol, a suit-wearing, grim-visaged, hand gun-carrying force that follows at least the top nine members of the federal legislative branch as they travel to, from and in Washington and their home districts or states. They have the same duties as their counterparts in the executive branch, the Secret Service, and none of the publicity.

But in extraordinary circumstances — such as the Flag Day shooting of House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, along with a current and a former staffer — details about their work flash into public view.

Medical Researcher Announces Challenge to Rohrabacher
National Democrats think Dr. Hans Keirstead is a strong challenger to 15-term incumbent in district Clinton won

Dr. Hans Keirstead is an expert in stem cell research and CEO of the biomedical company of AIVITA. (UC-Irvine News via Youtube)

A medical researcher announced Thursday that he is running against GOP Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, who Democrats view as particularly vulnerable in 2018.

Rohrabacher’s re-election race is one of the contests where the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 elections could be a more pertinent campaign issue, since Rohrabacher is a vocal supporter of bolstering relationships with Russia.

Scalise, Shot at Baseball Practice, Known as Behind-the-Scenes Mover
Republican Whip has been credited with moving signature bills, working with Trump

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, right, celebrates the Republicans’ win in last year’s Congressional Baseball Game with Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

On the Hill, Rep. Steve Scalise works behind the scenes to convince other Republicans to line up behind his Party’s agenda.

But on the baseball field during the annual Congressional game, he plays up the middle: He’s the second baseman.

House GOP Leaders Schedule More Health Care Votes
Paul Ryan and his team chip away at ‘Phase 3’ of health plan

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, right, and his leadership team are moving forward on the health care front. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As the House waits on the Senate to come up with its version of a bill to partially repeal and replace the 2010 health care law, GOP leaders on Thursday announced the chamber would move some health care bills that are part of the third phase of its overhaul strategy.

The American Health Care Act (AHCA) that the House passed in May was meant to be one of three phases of the effort because of limitations Republicans face in moving the measure through the budget reconciliation process. That process has prevented Republicans from advancing policies they typically all agree on, like allowing insurers to sell across state lines, GOP leaders have argued.