Marsha Blackburn

Word on the Hill: Golf Day on Capitol Hill
Free pretzels and shuffling staffers

It's National Golf Day. Here is Florida Rep. Tom Rooney teeing off as Tennessee Rep. Jim Cooper, California Rep. Duncan Hunter and Pennsylvania Rep. Mike Doyle watch during the First Tee Congressional Challenge golf tournament in 2015. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It’s National Golf Day, which means golf industry leaders and PGA Tour winner Billy Hurley III will be on Capitol Hill.

A coalition of golf’s leading organizations, known as WE ARE GOLF, is scheduled to meet with members of Congress to discuss the sports economy and impact.

Key Conservatives Come Around on GOP Health Plan
Republican Study Committee leaders sign off, but Freedom Caucus still wary

Walker and several members of the Republican Study Committee voiced their support for the GOP health plan. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

By JOHN T. BENNETT And LINDSEY McPHERSON, CQ ROLL CALL

Several key Republicans on Friday endorsed the health care overhaul bill crafted by GOP leaders and the White House, saying President Donald Trump had agreed to changes they favored minutes earlier during an Oval Office meeting. With a vote on the so-called American Health Care Act scheduled for this coming Thursday in the House, the news was welcomed by supporters of repealing and replacing the 2010 health care law.

Women’s History Month Update on a Women’s Museum
Advocates say they are ‘closer than ever’ to making museum a reality

Joan Wages, left, and Susan Whiting are shown at a brunch for the the National Women’s History Museum in 2015. (Courtesy National Women’s History Museum)

Here is your Women’s History Month reminder that a National Women’s History Museum for the National Mall is still in the works. 

Just more than 20 years since the organization to build the museum was founded, there is a congressional commission to study its creation and a team of people ready to follow through if it gets greenlighted.

Inexperience Weakens Congress and the White House
A younger, less experienced Congress tackles some old and knotty issues

From left, President Donald Trump, House Speaker Paul Ryan, and Vice President Mike Pence talk as the president finishes his speech at the Republican congressional retreat in Philadelphia on Jan. 26. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo/Pool)

For the first time in U.S. history, we have a president with no government experience. And he’s looking to work with a Congress that has lost members with significant legislative prowess on some issues in recent years.

President Donald Trump’s administration started off with a flurry of executive actions, reportedly without consulting Congress and some members of his own Cabinet. The episodes had one senior lawmaker shaking his head.

Democratic Lawmakers Feel Boost from Women’s March
Minority party hopes movement will help Congress rein in Trump

Protesters march down Independence Avenue in Washington, holding signs during the women’s march on Saturday, the day after the inauguration of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Capitol Dome was more than just a symbolic backdrop for Saturday’s Women’s March on Washington. It was the intended target of hundreds of thousands of voices of frustration with President Donald Trump. 

For all of the anti-Trump placards — both crude and shrewd — many marchers descended on the nation’s capital to send a message to the branch of government that, they hope, will be a check on the new president.

Republican Gender Gap Could Grow in the House
Ideology, not gender, is often driving factor in open primaries

Reps. Ann Wagner of Missouri, right, and Jackie Walorski of Indiana could both run for higher office in 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans will be down one woman next year. And with administration picks forthcoming and a handful of female members weighing runs for other offices, the party’s gender gap could grow. 

With their largest majority in more than 80 years, Republicans were mostly on defense in 2016. 

Ryan, Praised for Inclusiveness, Faces Hurdles Seeking Another Speaker Term
Conservatives say they'll weigh elections results, lame-duck action

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan touts the House Republican policy agenda after a GOP conference meeting in September. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Paul D. Ryan’s first as year as House speaker played out like a roller coaster. But despite the rocky ride, the Wisconsin Republican reaches his one-year anniversary Oct. 29 earning relatively high marks from many in his caucus.

Praised for bringing a more inclusive leadership style to the fractious House GOP conference, Ryan, 46, is widely expected to seek another term as speaker during the upcoming lame-duck session, despite talk of opposition from more conservative lawmakers and grousing from some of the Republican faithful about his contortions over Donald Trump's presidential bid.

Democrats Protest Fetal Tissue Report
Walk out of investigative panel formed in the aftermath of Planned Parenthood video controversy

House Democrats on Wednesday walked out of a meeting of a congressional investigative panel launched in the aftermath of the controversy over Planned Parenthood's abortion practices, charging the proceedings amounted to a "witch hunt."

The meeting of the Select Investigative Panel on Infant Lives was to consider a report recommending that the biotech company StemExpress LLC and its founder Catherine Spears Dyer be held in contempt for refusing to comply to subpoenas seeking accounting records relating to research of fetal tissue.

Ivanka Trump Meets With Female GOP Lawmakers
Childcare and women's policy issues discussed

Ivanka Trump introduces her father, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, for his acceptance speech at the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio in July. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Ivanka Trump, daughter and campaign aide to Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, met with female GOP senators and congresswomen Tuesday afternoon.

The women discussed childcare and women's policy issues at the roundtable meeting at the Republican National Committee. Donald Trump released policy proposals for helping working families last week that his daughter helped him develop. 

Once Unthinkable, Frank Guinta Could Survive His Primary
A year ago, New Hampshire congressman looked dead in the water

Rich Ashooh, left, took the stage at the Seacoast Republican Women's Chilifest in Stratham, N.H., just after primary opponent, Rep. Frank Guinta, second from right, had finished speaking. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

SCAMMAN FARM, STRATHAM, N.H. — Rep. Frank C. Guinta had barely finished speaking when the long-legged Rich Ashooh bounded onstage Saturday to address the party faithful at the 17th annual Seacoast Republican Women's Chilifest. 

"Tuesday is an important day," Ashooh said, standing on bales of hay, while in the garage behind him, 40 crocks of chili simmered. "But Wednesday is an even more important day," he said, a nod to the start of the general election campaign in the state's infamously swingy 1st District.