Maryland

Beefing Up Afghan Troop Level Would Be Major Shift for Trump
In 2012, he called conflict ‘complete waste,’ adding, ‘Time to come home!’

U.S. Army 1st Lt. Melissa Fusco gives candy to an Afghan boy on the streets in Logar Province in Afghanistan in 2009. President Donald Trump will address the nation Monday night on his plan for U.S. military operations there. (Courtesy Spc. Richard Jones/Wikimedia Commons)

President Donald Trump is expected to announce Monday night that he is sending thousands more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, breaking with his yearslong disdain for the nearly 16-year-old conflict there.

As a candidate, Trump rarely talked about the Afghanistan War and stability operation other than to disparage it. He used it as an example of why his nationalistic approach would be better than any of his Republican or Democratic foes, arguing the George W. Bush and Obama administrations had wasted billions of dollars there for little strategic gain.

Trump Is Quickly Running Out of GOP Factions to Alienate
Republican strategist: ‘He’s basically crossing out all of his allies’

President Donald Trump’s ouster of White House chief strategist Steve Bannon is seen by some as his first major slight to his conservative base. (SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump is running out of Republican Party factions to offend and alienate after firing Steve Bannon, the White House chief strategist who was a bridge to the president’s conservative base.

Along with Friday’s blow to his base, a defensive and sometimes erratic Trump in the past few weeks alone has attacked once-supportive business leaders, GOP lawmakers and voters eager to distance themselves from far-right and white supremacist protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia. He’s also lashed out at Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a key player in any effort to push forward his legislative agenda.

Who Did Former Members of Trump’s Manufacturing Council Donate to?
None made contributions to Trump, but many hedged their bets on both parties

Merck Pharma CEO Kenneth Frazier, right, was the first of four CEOs to resign from President Donald Trump’s American Manufacturing Council after the president’s remarks on the demonstration and violence by white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend. (Win McNamee/Getty Images file photo)

An analysis of political contributions of the four CEOs who resigned from President Donald Trump’s American Manufacturing Council after his Charlottesville remarks show they are deep-pocketed donors who have contributed to both parties.

Notably, none of them donated to the president’s 2016 campaign, as many major business donors were wary of then-candidate Trump.

Opinion: Stuck on the Back Bench? Why Not Run for President
Last House member to win presidency was in 1880 — it was an accident

An engraving of President James A. Garfield’s assassination. Not since Garfield has a sitting House member so much as won an electoral vote in a presidential election. (Engraving from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper)

No sitting House member has won an electoral vote for president since 1880, when Ohio’s James A. Garfield captured the White House — and he didn’t even mean to run for the job.

In fact, the Ohio legislature had just voted to appoint Garfield to a Senate term — for which he would have been seated in March 1881 — when the GOP met in Chicago to pick its nominee for the presidency in the summer of 1880.

Trump Implies Nuclear Strike on North Korea is Possible
Meantime, Tillerson tries to cool tensions in the region

People at a railway station in Seoul, South Korea watch a television showing President Donald Trump on Wednesday. Trump issued an apocalyptic warning to North Korea on Tuesday, saying it faces "fire and fury" over its missile program. (JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump issued an implicit warning to North Korea Wednesday morning, tweeting the U.S. nuclear arsenal is “far stronger and more powerful” than it ever has been.

A day after warning the United States would hit the North with “fire and fury” if Pyongyang repeated threats that it would strike American targets, Trump took to Twitter and appeared to signal he is prepared to use nuclear weapons against North Korea if conflict breaks out.

The Road Ahead for Donna Edwards
Future may involve academia or local political office

After leaving Congress, Maryland Democrat Donna Edwards hit the road in a 25-foot RV named Lucille. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Nine months after losing a hard-fought race for a Senate seat in Maryland’s Democratic primary — and just days after ending nearly a decade of service in the House — Donna Edwards hit the road.

Not just to get away, she said on Facebook, but “to meet people who don’t think about politics all the time but whose lives are affected by politics every day.”

Republican Matt Rosendale Challenging Montana’s Jon Tester
State auditor could still face a crowded GOP primary

Montana State Auditor Matt Rosendale announced on Monday he’s challenging Democratic Sen. Jon Tester. (Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Montana State Auditor Matt Rosendale is challenging Democratic Sen. Jon Tester, he announced Monday. 

His announcement video begins with an image of the Capitol Dome's shadow over Montana scenery, with the narrator decrying an "intrusive federal government run by insiders, liberals and big spenders."

GOP Congress Blames White House Chaos for Failures
House and Senate Republicans say administration distracts from advancing agenda

The calamity inside President Donald Trump’s White House has Congress complaining that its getting in the way of the legislative branch’s work. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By REMA RAHMAN and JOHN T. BENNETT

Some House and Senate Republicans are blaming an erratic Trump White House for getting in the way of advancing their shared legislative agenda, saying the constant noise from the West Wing makes it nearly impossible to get things done.

Word on the Hill: Week Wrap Up
Tennis tournament results, Baby Desk report, bossy staffers

A Capitol employee pushes a cot towards Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s suite of offices in the Capitol on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

It’s the end of a very long congressional week.

Senators spent the night in the Capitol and I’m sure many of you reading this now are running on little — or no — sleep.

John Delaney Running for President in 2020
Maryland Democrat won't seek re-election to House

The field to replace Maryland Rep. John Delaney in 2018 is already crowded. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Maryland Democratic Rep. John Delaney announced Friday afternoon he’s running for president in 2020. He won’t run for re-election or for governor in 2018.

Shortly after the House recessed for its August break, The Washington Post published an op-ed by the third-term congressman detailing why he’s running. He also released a nearly six-minute video that opens with him talking about President Donald Trump.