Massachusetts

Word on the Hill: Last Week Before Recess
Your social calendar for the week

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich was spotted making his way to the Capitol office of House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

It’s the last week before the July Fourth recess, when Congress takes a break to celebrate the national holiday.

On Thursday, we’ll tell you what some members do for the Fourth.

Rep. Moulton Proposes on Speaker’s Balcony
Liz Boardman said yes

Liz Boardman, left, and Rep. Seth Moulton are getting married. (Photo courtesy of Moulton's twitter)

Rep. Seth Moulton asked Liz Boardman to marry him on Friday.

The Massachusetts Democrat brought Boardman up to the iconic Speaker’s balcony to pop the question. The couple has been together for over two years.

Pelosi Blows Off Calls to Step Down
‘It's not up to them,’ she says of Democrats calling for new leadership

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi dismissed calls on Thursday for her to step down. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Describing herself as “worth the trouble,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi Thursday blew off calls from some chamber Democrats for her to step down from leadership in the wake of special election losses this year and a failure to win a House majority in four straight national elections. 

“It’s not up to them,” the California Democrat said of members calling for her to let someone else give it a try, before calling herself a “master legislator.”

Word on the Hill: Happy Birthday, Dianne Feinstein!
‘Game of Thrones’ and Japanese agriculture

California Sen. Dianne Feinstein arrives at the Capitol for the Senate Democrats’ policy lunch in May. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It’s Dianne Feinstein’s birthday. The oldest currently serving senator turns 84 today. The California Democrat has been in the Senate since 1992.

Feinstein also happens to share a birthday with other powerful Democrats in Congress: Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts turns 68 today.

Where the Cash Is Coming From in Georgia and South Carolina Special Elections
Out-of-state money is buoying Georgia Democrat Jon Ossoff’s bid

Democratic candidate for Georgia's 6th Congressional District Jon Ossoff speaks to campaign workers and volunteers at his campaign office in Chamblee, Ga., on Sunday. Ossoff meets Republican Karen Handel in the 6th District special election runoff on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

BY SEAN MCMINN AND RYAN KELLY

Bipartisan love may be on display in Washington, but farther down the coast, a vicious political battle is underway for Georgia’s 6th District.

Another Congressional Baseball Event for D.C. Kids
Horton’s Kids raises funds for children in at-risk neighborhood

The batting cages are open for Home Runs for Horton’s Kids. (Courtesy Horton’s Kids)

Members of Congress are coming together at Nationals Park again, this time to support the city they work in.

The ninth annual Home Runs for Horton’s Kids to raise money for the nonprofit founded by a onetime Capitol Hill staffer is Wednesday. Horton’s Kids helps children in grades K-12 living in Washington’s most at-risk neighborhoods through educational and other social programs.

Long Bipartisan History of Congressional Baseball
Current series dates to 1962, with backing from Roll Call

Ted Williams, right, as manager of the Washington Senators, attended the Congressional Baseball Game at RFK Stadium, likely in 1969. To the legendary Boston Red Sox slugger’s left is Rep. Silvio Conte, R-Mass., the long-time captain of the Republican team. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The history of bipartisan congressional baseball dates back more than 100 years, though the game hasn’t always been played.

The current iteration of the game for charity goes back to 1962, when it was revived by Speaker John McCormack of Massachusetts with the backing of Sid Yudain and the then-young Roll Call newspaper.

US Cybersecurity in Need of Rapid Repair, Senators Told
Ex-Pentagon aide warns of large-scale attack by North Korea

Massachusetts Sen. Edward J. Markey is concerned about cybersecurity deficiencies in the private sector, particularly in utility companies. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Cybersecurity in the United States is in a severe state of disrepair, leaving the country vulnerable to attack from hacking groups backed by its opponents, two witnesses testified in a Senate subcommittee hearing Tuesday.

The witnesses told the Senate Foreign Relations Subcommittee on East Asia, the Pacific, and International Cybersecurity Policy that they believe a massive cyberattack is imminent unless the U.S. ratchets up its efforts to protect against and deter offensives from countries such as Russia, China, and North Korea.

Photos of the Week: Just Another 5 Days in D.C. — Not
The week of June 5 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

A crowd gathered at The Partisan bar watches as former FBI Director James B. Comey arrives to testify during the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The week was dominated by the anticipated appearance, actual appearance and analysis after the appearance of former FBI Director James B. Comey in front of the Senate Select Intelligence Committee on Thursday. One day before that, Washington also watched current intelligence officials testify before the same congressional panel — the probe into Russian meddling in the U.S. election and what the president might have asked of his officials dominating the news cycle. 

Since the next steps of the investigation are in the hands of the special counsel and could take years to resolve, this week could go down as one of the most prominent in 2017.

House Republicans Vote to Strip Away Post-Financial Crisis Safeguards
Bill isn’t expected to be taken up in the Senate

Texas Rep. Jeb Hensarling says that “all of the promises of Dodd-Frank were broken.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

House Republicans voted 233-186 Thursday to repeal large parts of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial overhaul, just one month short of the seventh anniversary of the landmark law’s enactment.

The measure would unwind much of the financial structure put in place in the wake of the financial crisis. One of the biggest pieces of legislation enacted during the two terms of President Barack Obama, Dodd-Frank was designed to prevent the type of practices that led to the 2008 financial crisis and the recession it caused. Republicans have long complained that the law stifled the economy because it put too large a regulatory burden on business.