Maxine Waters

Not OkCupid: Staffers urged to tell sweethearts to skip the Capitol Hill deliveries
Otherwise, Capitol Police will be peeking at notes from your sweetie ... and they will probably be late

Security procedures might squash Valentine’s Day treats for staffers. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

It’s a well-known fact of life on Capitol Hill: It’s nearly impossible to get packages delivered in a timely manner. That includes Valentine’s Day.

Senate staffers are being urged to tell their sweethearts to skip romantic gestures that include deliveries to congressional office buildings this week.

The lobbyists: Roll Call’s people to watch in 2019
Are they worried the new Congress will make war on K Street? Do they look worried?

Michael Williams, a longtime banking and finance policy lobbyist, aims to bridge the divide between progressives and his clients. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump looms large on almost every important issue, but it won’t be all about him for some individuals on Roll Call’s list of People to Watch in 2019. 

The financial sector will be learning to survive a less business-friendly environment in the House, and a longtime Democratic lobbyist is well-positioned to lend a hand.

Housing finance agency confirmation hearing could involve dueling mortgage plans
The Senate Banking hearing could show the likely direction of efforts to overhaul agencies that are huge players in the national mortgage market

Ranking member Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, left, and Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I., attend a Senate Banking Committee hearing in Dirksen Building titled “Oversight of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission,” on December 11, 2018. Jay Clayton, chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, testified. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Trump administration’s still undisclosed plans to end the federal conservatorship of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will be a focus of upcoming confirmation hearings for the nominee of the federal agency overseeing the two government sponsored enterprises.

Democrats such as Senate Banking ranking member Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, have said they’re concerned about the suitability of Mark Calabria, the nominee to run the Federal Housing Finance Agency. The committee hasn’t said when it will hold a hearing on Calabria’s nomination.

Dr. Jekyll, Mr. State of the Union
Trump will speak of unity and togetherness. So nice, right?

At last year’s State of the Union, the president spoke of “one American family.” It wasn’t long before that heartwarming message went up in a puff of Twitter smoke, Murphy writes. (Win McNamee/Getty Images file photo)

OPINION — I love a tradition more than anybody, but the modern State of the Union address, which President Trump will deliver again Tuesday night, has descended into the most ridiculous annual hour and a half of nonsense that the country has to endure other than the Super Bowl. Can somebody please put America out of this misery?

The idea of an American president briefing Congress was originally such a practical necessity that it was codified in the Constitution. Without modern communications and with travel into and out of the capital difficult, the Founding Fathers correctly decided that the president should communicate regularly with the representatives of the states about the government they were all a part of.

Photos of the Week: Powerful women take over powerful committees, Barr interviews and museums reopen
Roll Call’s photographers take from this week in the Capitol

Sen. John Kennedy, R-La., waits for William Barr, nominee to he Attorney General of the United States, to arrive in his office for their meeting on Monday, Jan. 28, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Extremist anti-immigration group’s video of Ruben Gallego’s home reported to Capitol Police
The Southern Poverty Law Center alerted Gallego’s office to the post

Rep. Ruben Gallego’s office reported the actions of Patriot Movement AZ to the U.S. Capitol Police. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A fringe far-right group has been reported to U.S. Capitol Police for posting photos of Rep. Ruben Gallego’s home on social media and filming outside of his neighborhood.

The Southern Poverty Law Center alerted Gallego’s office to the posts, citing the group’s violent rhetoric and ties to white supremacists as reasons for concern.

Stacey Abrams has already delivered her message
No matter what she says in her SOTU response, the Democrat is heralding a new era for her party

Democrats picked Stacey Abrams, who fell short in Georgia’s governor’s race, to respond to the State of the Union. The choice makes a lot of sense, Curtis writes. (Jessica McGowan/Getty Images file photo)

OPINION — Move over Beto O’Rourke, the candidate who brought Texas Democrats closer than they had been for years in his eventually unsuccessful Senate race against GOP Sen. Ted Cruz last year.

Will he or won’t he run for president? That’s the question that’s been following him during his postelection adventures. But another Democrat who caught the attention of national leaders and celebrities in her midterm contest is getting ready for her moment on the national political stage.

A day of House drama over a resolution blaming Trump for the shutdown
Conservatives disrupt floor proceedings in objection, Democrats amend resolution to appease Republicans

Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Ariz., forced a House vote Tuesday on a motion to adjourn, because of his objections to a Democratic resolution that blames President Donald Trump for the 35-day partial government shutdown that ended Friday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Republicans disrupted normal floor proceedings Tuesday because they were upset that the Democratic majority scheduled a vote Wednesday on a resolution that blamed President Donald Trump for the 35-day partial government shutdown. 

The resolution, sponsored by freshman Virginia Democratic Rep. Jennifer Wexton, was ultimately amended to address Republicans’ complaints but not without some partisan squabbling and procedural antics. 

House passes cryptocurrency, insider trading bills
Measures were delayed by debate over spending proposals

The House has passed three bills related to cryptocurrency and insider trading. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images file photo)

After a week of shutdown-related delays, the House has passed three financial services bills that had been expected to receive floor votes early last week, but were delayed as the House debated spending proposals.

Lawmakers agreed by voice vote Monday to pass under suspension of the rules a bill  co-sponsored by Reps. Ted Budd, a North Carolina Republican, and Stephen F. Lynch, a Massachusetts Democrat, that would create an interagency task force led by the Treasury secretary to research how new financial technology, or fintech, is being used in financial crimes and terrorism, and develop regulatory and legislative responses. The bill would also establish a grant fund for programs and ideas for preventing terrorists and other bad actors from using cryptocurrencies for nefarious ends.

These House Democrats marched to the Senate before Thursday votes
Their message was to urge senators to vote "to end the Trump-McConnell shutdown," Rep. Barbara Lee said.

Freshman Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., walks to the Senate floor with other House members on Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019. (Tom Williams/ CQ Roll Call)

Democratic House members marched from their chamber to the Senate Thursday afternoon, walking onto the floor just as the upper chamber took votes on two competing proposals that would have reopened government.

Their message is to urge senators to vote “to end the Trump-McConnell shutdown,” Rep. Barbara Lee said.