Mia Love

Republican players are low, but camaraderie is high ahead of Congressional Softball Game
Lawmakers and press corps unite to fight against breast cancer

Florida Democratic Rep. Kathy Castor waits for her pitch at last year’s Congressional Women’s Softball Game. This year’s game is scheduled for June 19. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The official list of players in this year’s Congressional Women’s Softball Game is OUT! (to be read in an umpire’s voice) and we have just over a month before members of Congress and the D.C. press corps face each other on the field again.

The members team, which is historically composed of a bipartisan bunch of female lawmakers, has seen a decreasing number of Republican players over the years, one of them being last year’s MVP, former Rep. Mia Love. This year Sens. Joni Ernst and Shelley Moore Capito, Res. Cmmsr. Jenniffer González-Colón and Rep. Martha Roby make up less than a third of the team.

The congressional softball team lost its MVP, but these newcomers are on deck
Donna Shalala, Deb Haaland and Kim Schrier were all spotted at a recent practice

Mia Love, last year’s congressional softball MVP, may have lost in the midterm elections, but the team still has high hopes for the big game on June 19. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

They look like your typical active Washingtonians as they hit the field for practice, right down to the spandex leggings. But these are no ordinary league players — they’re the powerful women of the congressional softball team. 

The fielder in the University of Miami hat? That’s Donna Shalala. She may be new to Congress, but the 78-year-old is no rookie. Yankees owner George Steinbrenner once coached her little league team.

More GOP women want to run for the House. But why now?
Female Republicans are stepping up to run earlier than last cycle

Republican Tina Ramirez, who has worked in and around Congress for much of her career, is challenging Democratic freshman Abigail Spanberger in Virginia’s 7th District. (Courtesy Tina Ramirez’s campaign)

Stephanie Bice is a Republican from a deeply conservative state that’s only sent three women to Congress. But the election of a record-breaking number of female freshmen to the House in 2018, all but one of them Democrats, helped her decide to run for the chamber herself.

“It was a signal to all women that politics isn’t just … a man’s world,” said the Oklahoma state senator, who recently announced her candidacy for the 5th District. “It shows that women have as much of an ability to win these seats. We just need to field the candidates.”

Congressional women to take on female media members in annual softball game
Congressional women’s softball game has raised $1.3 million in its 11-year history

Members of Congress show off the American flags on their uniforms before the seventh annual Congressional women’s softball game near Capitol Hill in Washington D.C. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Congressional women will try and reclaim softball supremacy after three-straight losses to female members of the press during the 11th-annual Congressional Women’s Softball Game. 

The event, set for June 19, features a clash between female members of the House and Senate against the women who cover them. All proceeds from the game will benefit the Young Survivor’s Coalition, an organization that raises money and provides resources for young adults affected by breast cancer.

A Kamala Harris candidacy is a test, and not just for the candidate
2020 hopeful’s life story is the story of America, even if many don’t see it that way

Sen. Kamala Harris won’t just be confronting her Democratic rivals in her quest for the presidency, but also questions about her “exotic” identity that few other candidates face, Curtis writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — Of course, a reporter asked Kamala Harris how she would describe her identity. The California senator, a new entry into a crowded and growing Democratic field to challenge Donald Trump next year, answered simply, “I describe myself as a proud American.”

It’s a question no other candidate has been asked, and one that Harris will no doubt be asked again before the long slog to November 2020 is completed.

Former Reps. Mia Love, Luis Gutiérrez join CNN as commentators
Meanwhile, Ileana Ros-Lehtinen and Lamar Smith head to K Street

Former Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, is now a CNN political commentator. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Reps. Mia Love and Luis Gutiérrez have wasted no time finding new gigs after leaving Congress last week.

Love, a Utah Republican and the only black female Republican in the last Congress, and Gutiérrez, a longtime Chicago-based Democrat, have joined CNN as political commentators.

Rep. Mia Love MIA in Lame Duck Session
Minnesota’s Rep. Tim Walz tops list of absentee outgoing members

Outgoing Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, was criticized by a Utah good government group for missing most of the lame duck session since her loss to Rep.-elect Ben McAdams. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Utah Rep. Mia Love has missed more votes in the lame duck session than any of the nearly three dozen other lawmakers who lost their reelection races in November, according to a recent analysis.

The 4th District Republican was absent from a cluster of votes the week before Christmas as the federal government hurtled toward a partial shutdown. Altogether Love missed nearly 84 percent of votes since suffering her midterm loss, the most of any ousted member of Congress, according to an analysis by KUTV.

The Criminal Justice Bill Shows Where the GOP Is on Race
It wasn’t always this way for the party of Lincoln

Sen. Tim Scott, the only African-American Republican in the Senate, may have gotten his party’s backing for the criminal justice bill, Curtis writes. But where were his GOP colleagues when he tried to block the confirmation of Thomas Farr? (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

OPINION — Sen. Tim Scott, Republican from South Carolina, was optimistic after the Senate passed an amended bill this week that makes bipartisan progress on an issue — criminal justice reform — that has divided lawmakers for years.

Scott, an original co-sponsor of the bill, said in a statement: “By cutting recidivism, encouraging job training, education and mental health and substance abuse treatments for incarcerated individuals, and making our criminal justice system both smarter and tougher, we have taken a positive step forward.”

Happy New Year, Republicans! It’s Downhill From Here
Get ready for another no good, very bad year, complete with a looming constitutional crisis

If you think 2018 was bad, just wait for 2019. Above, Rep. Joe Barton, R-Texas, walks past the annual Christmas sign in the basement of the Capitol on  Dec. 11. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

OPINION — 2018 will go in the books as a bad one for most Republicans. They picked up two seats in the Senate, but lost 40 in the House. Their numbers among women in the House shrank from 23 to 13, and President Donald Trump can’t give away his chief of staff job.

Ask anyone who’s been there: The only thing worse than losing the majority in Congress is every day after that, when chairing committees and holding press conferences is replaced by packing boxes and saying goodbye to staff.

Republicans Aren’t Including Minorities or Women, Say Two Republican Minority Women
Lame-duck GOP Reps. Mia Love, Ileana Ros-Lehtinen deliver stark warnings for Republicans to be more inclusive

Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, is not happy with her party’s apparent lack of messaging to minority voters. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Two lame-duck House Republican women are sounding the alarm on their own party for excluding minorities and women from their messaging.

Rep. Mia Love, the only black Republican woman in the House, was defeated by Democrat Ben McAdams in a hard-fought race in Utah’s 4th District in the Salt Lake City area last month.