Michael Flynn

Capitol Ink | Nesting Doll

Capitol-Ink-11-01-17

Capitol Ink | Trump Book Club

Capitol-Ink-09-12-17

What’s Next? Be Patient, Mueller’s Russia Probe Could Last a Year or More
 

Capitol Ink | Scandal of the Week

Chaffetz and Cummings: Flynn Might Have Illegally Accepted Payments from Russia
Oversight Committee could use subpoena power to compel White House to comply with investigation

House Oversight Chairman Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, right, and ranking Democrat Elijah Cummings, D-Md., discuss their review of documents related to former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn in the Capitol on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Foreign Influence in the U.S. Cloaked in Unnecessary Obscurity, Watchdog Groups Say
Outdated technology creates roadblocks to basic research on Americans lobbying for foreign governments

Recent revelations about former national security adviser Michael Flynn, center, have raised questions about loopholes in a law that requires U.S. citizens who lobby for foreign governments to register with the Department of Justice. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Want to know how much money a foreign government has spent to lobby members of Congress? How many times a lawmaker met with a lobbyist representing a foreign government? What if that person made a political donation on the same day?

Good luck finding the answers from the federal office charged with tracking American citizens who get paid to represent foreign interests in the U.S.

GOP Leadership Reacts to Flynn Resignation
 

Capitol Ink | Out Like Flynn

Will Big Lies Insinuate Themselves Into Trump Policies?
Troubling times, as the line between fact and fiction blurs

South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, President-elect Donald Trump's pick for United Nations ambassador, should remind those in his inner circle that fake news has serious consequences, writes Mary C. Curtis. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

There is the big lie, the ‘Elvis is alive and kidnapped my baby and they were all sucked up into a spaceship’ kind of lie so beloved by supermarket tabloids and fringe websites. “Pizzagate” falls into that category. When you hear a conspiracy theory about underground tunnels and a child-abuse ring involving government officials and a pizza parlor in Washington, D.C., all you can do is shake your head — that is, unless you’re a guy with a rifle who decides to “self-investigate,” and ends up terrorizing a neighborhood.

Then there’s another kind of statement that sounds a little more reasonable than Elvis and aliens, but has a similar relation to the truth — the tales of millions of illegal and fraudulent voters who usurped my popular vote win or cost me that governorship, or of inner cities as unrelieved cauldrons of criminals, minorities and hopelessness. These stories are whispered by those who should know better, then repeated by more and more people in power. Uttered with a straight face, furrowed brow and a wheelbarrow full of fake concern, they insinuate themselves into policy that can change the character of our country.