Minimum Wage

Opinion: In North Carolina, the Good and Not-So-Good News
Compromise on ‘bathroom bill’ but an attempt to ban same-sex marriage

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper, left, is fighting a Republican supermajority in the state legislature that has sometimes seemed more intent on thwarting him than governing, Mary C. Curtis writes. (Courtesy Gov. Roy Cooper Facebook page)

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — It’s North Carolina, so, of course, the good news is followed by that pesky dark cloud every time.

You would think everyone in the state would welcome the end of the long saga over House Bill 2, the so-called bathroom bill, which was repealed recently in a compromise. That bill, which had compelled people to use the bathroom that corresponded to the gender on their birth certificates, also said cities could not follow Charlotte’s lead and enact their own anti-discrimination ordinances or a minimum wage and much more.

Former Rep. Eligio ‘Kika’ de la Garza Dies at 89
Texas Democrat served 16 terms in the House

Rep. Eligio “Kika” de la Garza, D-Texas, second from right, claps as Rep. Tom DeLay, R-Texas, throws a football in a House conference room in this undated photo. De la Garza passed away Monday. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

In 1978, Texas Democratic Rep. Eligio “Kika” de la Garza was invited to accompany his colleague Rep. Leo J. Ryan to Guyana on a fact-finding mission and escort people being held at the People’s Temple colony to safety.

De la Garza, like several colleagues in the House, turned down the invitation due to the House’s “hectic” schedule. Ryan and four other members of his delegation were murdered as they were getting on a plane to leave the country before more than 900 people committed mass suicide in the jungle.

Puzder Is First Trump Nominee Spiked by GOP
Votes just weren’t there for fast-food tycoon

Andrew Puzder, left was the first of President Donald Trump’s Cabinet nominees to not get enough Republican votes for confirmation. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

The withdrawal of Andrew Puzder’s nomination to be Labor secretary represents a milestone in the nascent Trump administration: the first time congressional Republicans played a significant part in spiking a Donald Trump Cabinet pick. 

The nomination of the CEO of CKE Restaurants, which runs the Carl’s Jr. and Hardee’s chains, had been plagued by scandal, including revelations he had employed an undocumented immigrant as a housekeeper and failed to pay taxes on her, as well as the fallout from a 1987 divorce that brought up allegations of domestic violence against him.

Puzder Backs Out of Labor Secretary Nomination
Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. head lacked confirmation votes

Andrew Puzder leaves a November meeting with Donald Trump in Bedminster Township, New Jersey. Trump later nominated Puzder to head the Labor Department though recent reports indicate that Puzder is expected to withdraw his nomination. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Andrew Puzder, President Donald Trump’s nominee for Labor secretary, backed out of the confirmation process Wednesday.

In a statement released by the CEO of CKE Restaurants, which runs the Carl’s Jr. and Hardee’s chains, Puzder said he decided to withdraw his nomination after “careful consideration and discussions with [his] family.”

Capitol Hill: Trump’s Ultimate Truth Squad
Presidents don’t usually get to decree what facts and figures will shape legislation

President Donald Trump arrives at the Department of Homeland Security on Wednesday where he addressed employees. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

If President Donald Trump’s emphatic disregard for the facts continues, it will soon threaten the viability of the legislative process and imperil the minimal credibility now afforded Congress. 

During his initial week in office, Trump has stood fast by three whoppers of substantial import — given that they now bear the imprimatur of the Oval Office, not the campaign trail or the board room or the set of a reality TV show. But so far, his spreading of falsehoods has not managed to muddy, or sully, the process of advancing the policy changes the country elected him to make.

Obama Touts Record, Sends Trump Message in Farewell Letter
Letter accompanies exit memos from Cabinet secretaries

President Barack Obama takes questions from student journalists at the White House last year. (Getty Images file photo)

The United States is “stronger and more prosperous” than it was on Inauguration Day 2009, President Barack Obama wrote in a letter to the American people, a dispatch that appears to have a message for his successor.

The letter, which will accompany exit memos from each of Obama’s Cabinet secretaries, begins with the 44th president reminding Americans of the challenges he faced when he was sworn in. Obama then ticks off what he sees as his top achievements, from bailing out U.S. automakers to avoiding an economic depression to passing his health care law to killing Osama bin Laden to a historically high high school graduation rate.

Washington Politics: A Hint of Compromise or North Carolina-Style Dysfunction?
Few signs of a fresh start in 2017

Is House Speaker Paul D. Ryan, left, listening to all of the American people when his party is deciding what it will deliver, Mary C. Curtis asks. Ryan is seen here with Vice President-elect Mike Pence at a press conference at the Capitol on Wednesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Though the year has just begun, there are already signs that the partisan power struggle in Washington will not benefit from a fresh start or optimistic resolutions of renewal.

“I want to say to the American people: We hear you. We will do right by you. And we will deliver,” said re-elected House Speaker Paul Ryan, as he no doubt relished uniting with President-elect Donald Trump and a Republican-controlled Washington to celebrate the consolidation of power by undoing President Barack Obama’s actions of the last eight years.

It's Official: Darrell Issa Re-Elected in California
Democrat Doug Applegate falls short in upset bid against GOP incumbent

California Rep. Darrell Issa is returning for a ninth term in Congress. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Republican Rep. Darrell Issa officially won re-election Monday, giving the House GOP yet another win in a seat it had once feared losing. 

The Associated Press called the race nearly three weeks after Election Day, with Issa leading Democrat Doug Applegate, 51 percent to 49 percent. 

Who’s Left to Fill Out Trump’s Cabinet?
President-elect continues to consider members of Congress from both sides of the aisle

President-elect Donald Trump announced Thursday that he would nominate retired Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis to be his secretary of Defense. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Updated Dec. 2, 3:31 p.m.

President-elect Donald Trump has announced who he’ll nominate for several of the high-profile positions for his incoming administration, but there's much speculation about who he'll put in the remaining spots. 

Sanders Draws Battle Lines With Trump
Spells out when he will oppose president-elect and when they might agree

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders said he is willing to work with President-elect Donald Trump on the minimum wage but called him out on climate change. (Brian Dozier for The Christian Science Monitor)

Sen. Bernie Sanders further expanded on when he would be interested in working with President-elect Donald Trump and when the Vermont independent will vigorously oppose the incoming president.

Speaking at a Christian Science Monitor breakfast on Thursday, Sanders, who unsuccessfully challenged Hillary Clinton in the Democratic presidential primaries, said that Trump ran as an anti-establishment populist, pledging not to cut Social Security or Medicare and raising the minimum wage to $10 an hour.