Mississippi

Analysis: Senators Writing Placeholder Defense Money Bill
Figure will be lower than House, in prelude to likely deal

Senate Appropriations Chairman Thad Cochran predicts Congress and the administration will eventually make a deal on raising the budget caps on defense accounts. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate appropriators’ forthcoming Pentagon spending bill for fiscal 2018, which will contain tens of billions of dollars less than the House’s measure, should be taken seriously, but not literally.

The Senate spending panel’s defense funding proposal is likely to grow, assuming — as is likely — that an agreement to slightly raise the budget caps is reached, as it has been for every year since the caps called for by the sequester were enacted in 2011.

Conservatives Plot Payback for Obamacare Repeal Failure
Outside groups warn that Republicans could lose control of Congress

A man holds a sign during an anti-health care overhaul rally in 2010. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

With the effort to repeal the 2010 health care law on the brink of failure, conservatives are warning that the Republican base will abandon the party. And some are already turning on GOP senators holding up the process.

Three GOP senators have said they would not support moving forward with an effort to repeal much of President Barack Obama’s signature health care law, which would be enough to block the effort. Conservatives, livid with lawmakers reneging on a seven-year promise to undo the law, say not fulfilling that pledge threatens the GOP majorities in Congress.

Trump Accuses Voting Officials of Hiding Something
At first vote commission meeting, accusations surround data claims

President Donald Trump speaks while flanked by Kansas Secretary of State, Kris Kobach, left and Vice President Mike Pence during the first meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump kicked off the first meeting of a panel he has tasked with probing his own voter fraud claims by questioning why some states are refusing to turn over voting data to his administration.

“I’m pleased that more than 30 states have already agreed to share the information with the commission and the other states that information will be forthcoming,” Trump said. “If any state does not want to share this information, one has to wonder what they’re worried about.”

Analysis: Chances for Budget Through Regular Order Shaky
Shell budget may be needed to set up reconciliation process for tax overhaul

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan has few viable paths to passing a budget resolution needed to set up the reconciliation process for a tax overhaul. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans are readying for a possible floor vote on a fiscal 2018 budget resolution as soon as next week, but with support for the plan currently shy of the 218 votes needed, action could be delayed weeks or even months.

After more than a month of negotiations, the House Budget Committee will mark up the fiscal blueprint on Wednesday. Floor action before the August recess appears to be the goal, and with several conservatives and moderates withholding support, that’s a target leaders will likely miss.

'Clean Coal' Tax Credit Gets a New Bipartisan Push in Senate

Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., has teamed up with Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., to push for tax credits for the so-called clean coal technology. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As investors give up on a Mississippi carbon-capture coal plant and the Trump administration continues to push for “beautiful clean coal,” a bipartisan group of senators on Wednesday reintroduced a bill to expand a tax credit in hopes of spurring investment in the costly technology.

The measure, with co-sponsors ranging from climate hawk Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., to coal-state stalwart Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., would extend and enhance a tax credit, known as Section 45Q, that rewards facilities that capture carbon emissions for either storage or enhanced oil recovery purposes.

100 Years of Women: Here's How Many Have Served in Congress
A look at the century since Montana's Jeannette Rankin joined the House

Reps. Nancy Johnson, R-Conn., right, and Marcy Kaptur, D-Ohio, with the portrait of Jeannette Rankin of Montana, who was the first woman elected to Congress in 1916, taking office in 1917. An unveiling ceremony for her portrait is shown in this file photo in the Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress on Sept. 29, 2005. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

When women’s rights advocate Jeannette Rankin, a Montana Republican, was elected to the House of Representatives a century ago, she noted, “I may be the first woman member of Congress, but I won’t be the last.”

Rankin took office in 1917 — a member of the 65th Congress. Since that time, 281 women have been elected full voting members of the House and 50 have become senators. 

Congress Still Grappling With Cybersecurity Concerns
Experts say networks on Capitol Hill lag in basic protections

Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden, seen here at a 2015 #Hack4Congress event at Google’s offices in Washington, is one of several lawmakers who have pushed for improved security for congressional computer networks. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lawmakers and their staffs have been aware for years that their internet communications could be prime targets for both foreign and domestic spies.

But after last year’s hacking of the Democratic National Committee by Russian operatives, many are reassessing security protocols that once seemed sufficient — even overbearing — and finding them lacking.

Voting Rights Battle Just Getting Underway
Two Democratic bills introduced before Trump commission’s sweeping request to states

New Orleans voter Albertine Reid leaves the booth at the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Charter School for Science and Technology in the city’s Lower Ninth Ward on Election Day last year. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Even before the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity raised alarms with its sweeping requests for state voter data, House Democrats rolled out legislation they hope will ensure the voting process is fair.

One measure, introduced at a news conference on Capitol Hill on June 22, would restore voter protections across 13 mostly Southern states. Sponsored by Alabama’s Terri A. Sewell and Georgia’s John Lewis, a civil rights icon, the measure is a response to the Supreme Court’s 2013 Shelby v. Holder decision. That ruling struck down provisions of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that required those states to seek federal approval before changing voter laws and also set a formula for determining which states would be subject to the law. 

Opinion: Democracy — With Big Brother in the Voting Booth
Trump election panel tries to validate his fantasies about voter fraud

Voters arrive to cast their ballots at Cheyenne High School in North Las Vegas on Election Day in November. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Some Americans believe in small government — until they don’t.

Remember the conservative mantra, “government is the problem?” Well, toss out that way of thinking for a group of leaders — some elected, some appointed — who want to create a complicated new arm of government bureaucracy, one that reaches into how and how often a person votes and sucks up a chunk of your Social Security number for good measure. And we’re paying for this?

Word on the Hill: Recess Week
Lawmakers show patriotism on Fourth of July

Members were in their districts for the Fourth. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Happy Wednesday and we hope everyone had a safe Fourth of July.

It’s the second recess week of the summer, following Memorial Day recess, and we want to hear about what your bosses are up to.