Mo Brooks

Mo Brooks Sues Census Bureau Over Counting Undocumented Immigrants
Congressman, state attorney general say practice could cost Alabama a seat in the House

Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala., joined a lawsuit with the Alabama state attorney general challenging a Census Bureau rule that would count undocumented immigrants to determine state population. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican Rep. Mo Brooks and Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Census Bureau over a rule that would count undocumented immigrants to determine state population.

In the suit, Marshall said Alabama would lose one seat in the House of Representatives and a seat in the Electoral College if the rule proceeds, AL.com reported.

Brooks Defends Blaming Falling Rocks for Rising Sea Levels
‘Erosion is the primary cause of sea level rise in the history of our planet,’ Alabama congressman says

Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala., argued with a climate scientist in a committee over the cause of rising sea levels. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Alabama Rep. Mo Brooks defended his statement saying falling rocks and erosion were the reason for rising sea levels.

Brooks earned national headlines when at a Wednesday House Science, Space, and Technology Committee hearing, he argued with a climate scientist.

Photos of the Week: Kids, a Kardashian and Macron at Capitol ... and More
The week of April 23 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., arrives to hold his weekly press conference as press offspring play on stage during Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Thursday saw some cute new members of the press corps and congressional staff — the children who took over the Capitol during Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day.

The visitors offered moments of levity during leadership news conferences in an otherwise busy and heated week on Capitol Hill. 

Brooks Suggests Republicans Are Retiring Because of Assassination Fears
Pointed at the large number of GOP members on baseball team who are leaving Congress

Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala., speaks to reporters at the Republican baseball team's first practice of the year at Eugene Simpson Stadium Park in Alexandria, Virginia, on Wednesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Alabama Rep. Mo Brooks suggested in a radio interview that Republicans are retiring en masse because of assassination fears.

Brooks was speaking on “The Dale Jackson Show” about the first Republican practice the Congressional Baseball Game after last year’s shooting that left Majority Whip Steve Scalise severely injured.

Chris McDaniel Will Run for Cochran Seat in Special Election
McDaniel had already launched a primary challenge to Roger Wicker

Chris McDaniel, Republican candidate for Mississippi Senate, speaks with patrons of Jean’s Restaurant in Meridian, Miss., May 29, 2014. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Mississippi state Sen. Chris McDaniel announced Wednesday he will switch from challenging GOP Sen. Roger Wicker in a primary to running in the November special election for resigning Sen. Thad Cochran’s seat. 

“By announcing early, we are asking Mississippi Republicans to unite around my candidacy and avoid another contentious contest among GOP members that would only improve the Democrats’ chances of winning the open seat,” McDaniel said in a statement, alluding to Republicans’ loss in an Alabama special election late last year. 

The House Staring Contest: Pelosi and Ryan
Speaker hemmed in by Democrats on one side, conservative Republicans on the other

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi leaves the House chamber Wednesday after ending her eight-hour speech on the floor. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan is in a staring contest with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi over immigration that could result in a government shutdown.

But if the Wisconsin Republican blinks, he will likely push conservatives, many of them already at a boiling point with his leadership, over the edge.

Freedom Caucus Members Withholding Votes GOP Needs to Pass CR
“The votes are not currently there to pass it with just Republicans,” Meadows says

Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows says the votes are not currently there to pass a CR with just Republicans. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 11:09 p.m. | While a majority of House Republicans appear ready to support a short-term continuing resolution to keep the government open through Feb. 16, enough Freedom Caucus members remain uncommitted to make passage questionable.

“The votes are not currently there to pass it with just Republicans,” Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows said before a crucial House GOP conference meeting on the topic Tuesday night.

Summing Up 2017 With 17 Graphics
Roll Call’s data reporters spent the year breaking down the breaking news

President Donald Trump speaking at the Capitol in April. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After one of the most politically charged presidential campaigns in many Americans’ lifetimes, a new administration swept into town at the beginning of 2017, and the Roll Call graphics team got to work reporting, investigating and explaining the new Washington.

As we all close the books on 2017, Roll Call dug through our work and put together a year in review, starting at the beginning:

Brooks Announces He Has High-Risk Prostate Cancer
‘Losing the Senate race may have saved my life. Yes, God does work in mysterious ways.’

Rep. Mo Brooks said he found out about his cancer in October. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Mo Brooks announced on the House floor Wednesday he has high-risk prostate cancer.

He will be receiving surgery Friday.

Analysis: Bannon Isn’t the Only One to Blame for Moore’s Loss
McConnell’s support for Strange, governor’s sex scandal, and moving election date all played a part

Steve Bannon arrives for Roy Moore’s “Drain the Swamp” campaign rally in Midland City, Ala., on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Former Alabama Supreme Court Justice Roy Moore’s shocking loss to Sen.-elect Doug Jones led multiple Republicans to blame former White House political adviser Steve Bannon. 

Drudge Report publisher Matt Drudge tweeted on Wednesday that “Luther Strange would have won in a landslide,” referring to the former Alabama attorney general who was appointed to fill the seat that Jeff Sessions vacated to become President Donald Trump’s attorney general.