Nebraska

Word on the Hill: Capitol Hill Could Save You Money
Ryan in New Hampshire, Williams at nonprofit, Murphy’s march continues

Save some money, move to Capitol Hill. Above, Tennessee’s David Kustoff arrives at the Capitol Hill Hotel for new member orientation on Nov. 14, 2016. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Here’s some good news for congressional staffers: Capitol Hill was ranked the fourth best place in D.C. to save money if you’re living off an annual salary of $50,000.

The financial planning app Rize released a list of the 14 best and worst places to live in D.C. on a $50,000 salary. Petworth, NoMa and Southwest Waterfront ranked first, second and third, respectively. Georgetown was ranked last.

Word on the Hill: Volunteers for Tiniest Opioid Victims
Smucker on Israel, and Murphy’s still walking

Ohio Rep. Michael R. Turner, center, is flanked by volunteers at a local hospital. (Courtesy Turner via Premier Health)

Rep. Michael R. Turner, R-Ohio, recently visited volunteers who cuddle with infants going through opiate withdrawal in Dayton. 

The volunteer Infant Cuddle Program at Miami Valley Hospital was launched recently and Turner got to thank the cuddlers last week.

Opinion: Trump’s Two-Front War Against McConnell and North Korea
And why Democrats are in no position to laugh

It may not be long before President Donald Trump starts portraying Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell as almost as much of a villain as Kim Jong Un, Shapiro writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Pool file photo)

If we survive the tweets of August, a Wall Street Journal headline should be immortalized as a symbol of this long hot summer in Trumpland. In the online edition of Friday’s Journal, the subhead on a stock-picking article actually read: “Analysts are trying to work out what happens to the markets they cover in the event of an all-out nuclear war.”

Here’s my personal stock tip for the apocalypse: Invest in personal hygiene companies like Procter & Gamble since we will need plenty of deodorant in our crowded fallout shelters.

Word on the Hill: Weekend Plans?
WOTH will be back mid-August

It's finally the weekend so get out of the Capitol — and the capital. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

It’s the weekend in Washington and the Senate recess has finally arrived, so pick up a book from our summer reading list, or if you're feeling active, try to beat the number of steps that Rep. Tim Walz, D-Minn., takes in a day.

HOH went for a walk with the congressman recently and ran some errands around the complex with him.

HOH’s Summer Reading List
There’s something for everyone in these six books

Clockwise from top left, books by Utah Sen. Mike Lee, Minnesota Sen. Al Franken, the Library of Congress, Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake, reporter Joshua Green and Nebraska Sen. Ben Sasse make HOH’s summer reading list. (Courtesy Penguin Random House (Lee, Flake and Green), Hachette Book Group (Franken), Library of Congress, and Macmillan Publishers (Sasse))

Recess is one of the few times when Washingtonians can really settle into a good book.

Whether you’re taking time off or just have a quiet office this month, here is HOH’s list of new books for the D.C. congressional nerd to check out this summer.

Word on the Hill: Bike Your District
Hiking town hall and BaconFest

West Virginia Rep. Alex X. Mooney tweeted a photo from his bike ride across his district. (Courtesy Mooney’s Twitter page)

Lawmakers often find interesting ways to travel across their states or districts each recess.

Last August, Sen. Christopher S. Murphy, D-Conn., walked across the Nutmeg State, and Sen. Gary Peters, D-Mich., did a motorcycle tour across the Wolverine State.

GOP Senators Should ‘Demand’ New Health Care Vote, Trump Says
President shifts stance on next step for second time in 24 hours

President Donald Trump, seen here with Republican senators at a White House meeting in June, is demanding they try again on health care. (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump spent a grey and sometimes rainy Saturday at the White House on a Twitter binge, firing off a late-afternoon tweet instructing Republican senators to demand another vote on a measure that would repeal and replace the 2010 health care law.

In the morning, the president threatened lawmakers’ health insurance and attacked members of his own party, saying they “look like fools” because they cannot pass major bills.

Former Sen. Nelson: GOP ‘Just Can’t Quite Pull it Together’ on Health Care
Says it’s ‘day of reckoning’ for seven years worth of promises to repeal Obamacare

Former Sen. Ben Nelson on where Republicans stand on health care reform: “I believe that you have to be very cautious on promises, and very consistent on keeping your promises when you make them.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Sen. Ben Nelson of Nebraska said he’s not surprised Republicans were having so much trouble passing a health care bill, saying Thursday it was the “day of reckoning” for seven years worth of promises that they would repeal the 2010 law.

“I believe that you have to be very cautious on promises,” he told the Omaha World-Herald, “and very consistent on keeping your promises when you make them.”

Protesters Rumble Through Senate Offices to Oppose Obamacare Repeal
Dozens arrested for refusing to disperse

Capitol Police lead arrested protesters out of the Hart Senate Office Building on Wednesday, July 19, 2017, as health care demonstrations popped up at Republican Senators' offices. Protesters called on GOP lawmakers to support a single payer, Medicare for All system. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By GRIFFIN CONNOLLY and KYLE STEWART

The afternoon started quietly. Journalists and Capitol Police officers awaited the arrival of an expected 500 health care legislation protesters. The protesters must be running late, a staffer joked outside Sen. Pat Toomey’s office.

Trump Dined on Rib-Eye, Cobbler With ‘Yes’ Votes as Health Care Bill Crumbled
White House defends dinner as ‘strategy session’ with vote-wranglers

President Donald Trump met Monday night with senators who were already expected to support the since-derailed Republican health care legislation. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

As the Senate Republican health care bill began taking on water, President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence dined on “rosemary-grilled” rib-eye steaks and “farm stand” peach cobbler with seven senators who were expected to support the legislation.

There was Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn of Texas, a vocal proponent of the legislation, who was involved in writing it and led the effort to wrangle the necessary votes. The same was true of his fellow GOP leaders present, Sens. John Thune of South Dakota and Roy Blunt of Missouri. All were sure to vote for the bill.