New Mexico

How GOP Outside Spending Turned a Loser Into a Winner in Montana
Congressional Leadership Fund spent $2.7 million to boost Greg Gianforte

Greg Gianforte won the special election for Montana’s at-large House seat Thursday despite attacking a reporter the night before. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Six months ago, Republican Greg Gianforte lost Montana’s gubernatorial election by nearly 4 points. Thursday night, he won statewide by about 6 points.

Congressional special elections are, well, special. The electorate is different, and so is the spending. Last fall, Gianforte was running against an incumbent.

Senators Warn FCC, Trump Administration About Freedom of the Press
Comes after CQ Roll Call reporter was pinned against a wall while covering the commission

Iowa Sen. Charles E. Grassley says it is customary for reporters to question public officials after meetings, as he is seen doing here. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senators, including Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley, are warning the Federal Communications Commission about its treatment of reporters after a CQ Roll Call reporter was manhandled Thursday.

“The Federal Communications Commission needs to take a hard look at why this happened and make sure it doesn’t happen again. As The Washington Post pointed out, it’s standard operating procedure for reporters to ask questions of public officials after meetings and news conferences,” the Iowa Republican said. “It happens all day, every day. There’s no good reason to put hands on a reporter who’s doing his or her job.”  

DCCC Breaks April Fundraising Record With $9 Million Haul
GOP outraised Democratic campaign arm by $1 million

New Mexico Rep. Ben Ray Luján is chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee raised more than $9 million in April, breaking its previous fundraising records for the month. Still, that’s about a million dollars less than what the group’s Republican counterpart raised last month.

Republicans are defending two House seats in two closely watched upcoming special elections in Montana and Georgia. The DCCC has invested in both of those races, but not as much as some Democrats would like. 

Word on the Hill: Staffers and Self-Esteem
Get your bikes ready for Friday

Virginia Sen. Mark Warner talks with an aide during a Senate Finance Committee hearing on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Staffers can learn about the positive effects of self-esteem on performance today.

As part of the Employee Assistance Program’s webinar series, this class will “outline ways to rewire our brains in order to be more optimistic and increase self-confidence,” the invitation reads. Staffers can also “discuss ways to build self-esteem and control negative thoughts.”

New Mexican Would Be First Native American Congresswoman
Former state party chairwoman running for Lujan Grisham’s seat

Debra Haaland is the latest Democrat to seek the open 1st District seat, which New Mexico Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham is vacating for a gubernatorial run. (Courtesy Democratic Party of New Mexico)

Former New Mexico Democratic Party Chairwoman Debra Haaland announced Tuesday she’s running for the state’s open 1st District seat. If elected, she would be the first Native-American congresswoman.

Haaland is a member of the Laguna Pueblo tribe and a former San Felipe Pueblo tribal administrator, the Albuquerque Journal reported. She ran unsuccessfully for lieutenant governor in 2014.

Maverick McCain Re-Emerges on Methane Vote
Surprise vote sinks resolution

Arizona Sen. John McCain, center, and Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, left, talk with reporters in the Capitol on May 10, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By JEREMY DILLON, ANDY VAN WYE, and ELVINA NAWAGUNA, CQ Roll Call

Sen. John McCain was thought to be a yes. But he says he was always a no. In the end, the Arizona Republican helped sink a resolution to upend an Obama administration climate change policy.

House GOP Optimistic Ahead of Health Care Vote
‘There were a lot of smiles in the room today’

Speaker of the House Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., leaves a meeting of the House Republican Conference in the Capitol on Thursday before the House plans to vote on the heath care bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By ERIN MERSHON and KERRY YOUNG, CQ Roll Call

House Republicans started celebrating early Thursday, ahead of their vote to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law.

A Fence by any Other Name is ... a Wall?
White House sees a 'wall' where spending bill calls for 'fencing'

According to the White House, this could be a wall. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The White House on Wednesday contended the omnibus spending bill making its way through Congress allows the administration to erect a “wall” along the U.S.-Mexico border. There’s only one problem: The bill uses the word “fencing,” which isn’t exactly what President Donald Trump promised repeatedly on the campaign trail.

The president time and again as a candidate used language like “big, beautiful wall” to described the border barrier he would erect as commander in chief. He promised it would keep illegal immigrants, drugs and crime outside of the United States via thousands of miles of reinforced steel and thick concrete.

Ex-Leader of Anti-Immigration Group Named Agency Ombudsman
Former FAIR chief Kirchner to represent U.S. Immigration Service

Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham, D-N.M., has in the past objected to Julie Kirchner’s association with the Trump administration, arguing that “instead of offering workable solutions” to immigration issues, appointees like Kirchner “only offer blunt force.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Udall: Congress Should Compel White House to Release Visitor Logs
New Mexico Democrat hits Trump over decision to keep records secret

New Mexico Sen. Tom Udall is the sponsor of the MAR-A-LAGO Act. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

One Democratic senator says Congress should require the White House to release its visitor records, after the administration announced Friday the logs would be kept secret.

The Trump administration cited security and privacy concerns in its decision to not publicly release its visitor logs. The decision, first reported by Time magazine, differs from the Obama administration, which publicly released its visitor records — though those logs were subject to redaction.