Oklahoma

Spending Shutdown Showdown Fizzling Out
Issues remain, but biggest fights getting knocked out ahead of deadline

From left, Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, Reps. David McKinley, R-W.Va., and Mike Doyle, D-Pa., attend a news conference at the House Triangle with the United Mine Workers of America on the Miners Protection Act, which would address expiring health care and pension benefits. Funding the miners’ benefits is one of the remaining issues that could affect the debate over government funding. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The first federal funding fight of President Donald Trump’s administration might be ending not with a bang but a whimper. 

House and Senate lawmakers negotiating an omnibus bill to fund the government through the end of September had said the biggest outstanding dispute was over cost-sharing subsidy payments to insurance companies that help lower-income people afford health care under the 2010 overhaul law.

Senate Intelligence Probe of Trump and Russia Grinds Forward
No one ever said it would be fast, but Democrats are frustrated about pace

Sens. Mark Warner and Richard M. Burr are slowly plodding ahead. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats may be frustrated about the pace of the Senate Intelligence Committee’s probe of Russian meddling in the 2016 election, but recent reports of trouble could be overblown.

A congressional source familiar with the committee’s work noted in particular the reported concerns about the Intelligence panel not having a full time staff for the investigation. The individuals detailed to work on the probe are spending roughly 95 percent of their time working on Russia’s activities in the United States, the source said.

Top Dems Blast Trump’s First 100 Days, Border Wall Demands
Schumer: Best if president 'stepped out' of government shutdown-avoidance talks

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, D-N.Y., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif. — pictured here in March — on Monday had critical words for President Donald Trump. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated at 11:35 a.m. Democratic leaders slammed President Donald Trump on Monday for a “parade of broken promises to working people” during his first 100 days, and said his demands for border wall funding in a must-pass spending bill have stalled talks to avert a government shutdown.

Congressional Democrats are planning a week-long barrage to counter a White House public relations campaign to paint Trump’s first three-plus months as successful. They offered a preview of their messages on a conference call with reporters, with Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer of New York dubbing many of Trump’s campaign promises “broken” or “unfulfilled.”

Syria, Trump and Congress’ Ever-Eroding War Powers
Lawmakers lukewarm to a force-authorization measure for U.S. missile strike

President Donald Trump and his national security team receive a briefing on April 6 about an air strike he ordered on a Syrian air base. (White House photo)

President Donald Trump has gone to great lengths to break from the policies and approaches of his predecessor. Yet, when it came to justifying a round of U.S. military missile strikes in Syria, the new commander in chief dusted off a legal rationale crafted by Barack Obama’s administration.

Like the 44th president, Trump contended that the Constitution vests in the office of the presidency enough war powers to carry out some isolated military operations without lawmakers’ approval.

Analysis: Trump’s Bold Talk Replaced by ‘See What Happens’ Stoicism
From health care to North Korea to Russia, president now strikes a wait-and-see tone

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg and U.S. President Donald Trump hold a news conference in the East Room of the White House April 12, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Donald Trump is taking a wait-and-see approach more and more often, following a 2016 campaign that espoused bold promises and exuded confidence.

Take his comments Thursday afternoon about an effort among White House officials and congressional Republicans to try again at repealing and replacing former President Barack Obama’s 2010 health care law.

Bridenstine Has Second Interview for NASA Post
Says interview ‘went well’ but hasn’t been offered administrator’s position

Rep. Jim Bridenstine, R-Okla., serves on the House Science, Space and Technology Committee. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Oklahoma Rep. Jim Bridenstine said a second interview to be administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration “went well.”

But Bridenstine told the Tulsa World he has not gotten a formal offer from the Donald Trump administration.

Opinion: House Members Should Take Civics Tests
… and avoid ‘let them eat cake’ moments

Oklahoma Rep. Markwayne Mullin recently told his constituents that the idea that he works for the voters of his district is “bullcrap.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Members of Congress should have to take a civics test. 

As you may have heard by now, Rep. Markwayne Mullin has a unique take on his relationship to his constituents. At a town hall meeting recently, the three-term Republican from Oklahoma, said the idea that he works for the voters of his district is “bullcrap.”

Former Rep. J.C. Watts Sues Feed the Children
Claims he was terminated after going to AG about irregularities

Former Rep. J.C. Watts, R-Okla., is suing Feed the Children, claiming he was fired as CEO as retaliation. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House GOP Leaders Tweak Health Care Proposal
Action before recess won’t make bill ready for a vote

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan has announced an amendment to the GOP’s health care bill that would create a high-risk pool for people with pre-existing conditions. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republican leaders seeking to change the narrative on the health care talks announced plans to tweak their proposal on Thursday before members leave for a two-week recess, a move they touted as “progress.”

But they acknowledged it does not make the legislation ready for a vote.

Two Capitol Police Officers Fired Guns at Woman’s Vehicle, Court Documents Show
The officers feared for their safety after a woman drove her car in their direction

Police mark shell casings on Independence Avenue near the U.S. Capitol after a woman tried to ram a U.S. Capitol Police cruiser resulting in two officers firing shots. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

New details have emerged in the security incident near the Capitol on Wednesday, with court documents showing that two Capitol Police officers fired their guns at a woman’s vehicle during an attempt to arrest her. 

Mia K. Hill, also known as Taleah Michelle Everett, was arrested Wednesday and faces several charges, including assaulting a police officer and destruction of property, after she drove her vehicle in the direction of the officers and damaged Capitol Police vehicles. A federal judge ordered the 20 year-old be held without bond pending a preliminary hearing on April 4. Hill does not have a fixed address.