Orrin G Hatch

Navajo Candidate Drops Out of Race Against Hatch
James Singer said he couldn’t raise the kind of money it would take to unseat seven-term Republican

James Singer is the first Utah Navajo to run for the Senate. (James Courage Singer for Senate via Facebook)

James Singer, the Democrat who launched a bid to unseat seven-term Sen. Orrin Hatch in April, has ended his campaign for Senate, citing fundraising as his campaign’s primary shortcoming.

While Singer said it would have been possible to continue his campaign as a “‘principled protest’ rather than a winning campaign,” since he wasn’t able to raise “the millions of dollars needed to challenge an established politician like Orrin Hatch,” he did not want to “waste the time, money, and energy of my friends and supporters in this matter.”

Congressional Security Details Remain Murky
‘Over the past two and a half years, I’ve built a special bond with each of them’

A Capitol Police officer keeps an eye on the Republicans’ baseball practice from the dugout at Four Mile Run Park in Alexandria, Va., in June 2015. (Bill Clark/Roll Call file photo)

The special agents who protect congressional leaders are a constant, anomalous presence in the Capitol, a suit-wearing, grim-visaged, hand gun-carrying force that follows at least the top nine members of the federal legislative branch as they travel to, from and in Washington and their home districts or states. They have the same duties as their counterparts in the executive branch, the Secret Service, and none of the publicity.

But in extraordinary circumstances — such as the Flag Day shooting of House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, along with a current and a former staffer — details about their work flash into public view.

Shooting Victims Come from All Walks of Hill Life
Majority whip among those injured at Republican baseball team practice

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise was shot Wednesday morning at a Republican congressional baseball team practice. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

A member of congressional leadership, two members of his security detail, a young Hill staffer and a lobbyist — a microcosm of the often hierarchical but interconnected life on Capitol Hill — were all injured at Wednesday morning’s GOP baseball team practice.

The shooting of Majority Whip Steve Scalise, as a member of House leadership, has garnered the most attention.

Word on the Hill: Comey Time
Seersucker Thursdays begin

D.C. will be watching as former FBI director James B. Comey testifies today. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former FBI director James Comey is heading to Capitol Hill this morning and D.C. is preparing in many different ways.

The Capitol will be hectic leading up to the 10 a.m. hearing. For those outside of the Capitol complex, or able to leave work for a couple of hours, there are a handful of bars in D.C. opening early, pouring cleverly titled drinks, and taking advantage of some great TV.

Analysis: Why the Border Adjustment Tax Is Dead and an Overhaul Could Be Too
Proponents have failed to address critics’ concerns; lack of alternatives make overhaul difficult

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan, right, and Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, left, have pushed the border adjustment tax as a way to raise roughly $1 trillion in revenue to partially offset an ambitious corporate tax rate cut. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republican leaders’ controversial border adjustment tax is dead, and as a result, their plans to dramatically overhaul the tax code could soon be too. 

The border adjustment tax, or BAT, is a proposal to tax imports instead of exports, reversing the way the United States currently taxes goods crossing its borders. House GOP leaders, namely Speaker Paul D. Ryan and Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, have pushed for the tax as a way to discourage U.S. companies from moving operations overseas and to raise roughly $1 trillion in revenue to partially offset an ambitious corporate tax rate cut.

Trump, Tax Writers Find Doubts on Plan for Social Security IDs
Concerns over identity theft alarm even some Republicans

Missouri Sen. Roy Blunt is concerned about the proposals to expand the use of Social Security numbers. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump and top congressional tax writers say they want to prevent undocumented workers from claiming tax breaks they aren’t entitled to by tightening up the standards, but a proposal to expand the use of Social Security numbers is finding resistance among lawmakers, including Republicans who are worried about identify theft.

Trump’s fiscal 2018 budget request would expand on language in the 1996 tax overhaul that required tax filers claiming the earned income tax credit to include a qualifying child’s name and Social Security number on the return. The administration said it would tighten the mandate to require such filers to also show they have the right to work.

Bill Dauster Caps Decades of Senate Service
Longtime Democratic aide retired last week

Bill Dauster, seen here to the right of former Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, retired from Senate service last week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

There aren’t many Senate aides who get multiple floor speeches recognizing their retirement, but then again, there are not many with as much influence on policymaking as Bill Dauster.

With the arrival of Memorial Day recess, Dauster retired after spending the bulk of the past three decades as a top Democratic staffer to senators, committees and leadership.

Trump Wants More Interstate Tolling, But Lawmakers Skeptical
Plan would give states more options

The Trump administration suggested in a fact sheet last week the idea of reducing restrictions on tolling on interstate highways. Pictured: I-278 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images File Photo)

President Donald Trump fleshed out his proposal last week to spend $1 trillion on infrastructure by listing tolling on interstate highways as one way to raise funds, but his idea is encountering reluctance in Congress.

Several key lawmakers said they were receptive to the idea, but cited obstacles to moving forward.

Chaffetz Resignation Sparks Conflict, Compressed Campaigns in Utah
Governor and state legislature disagree on special election timeline

Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz says he will resign on June 30. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

In any other year, Rep. Jason Chaffetz’s decision to resign would have sparked a crowded Republican primary. But as one Utah GOP operative put it, this year is not like any other year. 

Consultant Chuck Warren sat down with a state lawmaker Friday morning to talk about a possible run for Congress. The lawmaker pointed to a picture of his family and his home and said, “Why would I give that up to go up there and pound my head against a wall?”

Health Care Will Determine Progress of Rest of Agenda
Spending debate, tax code rewrite all interrelated

Senate Finance Chairman Orrin G. Hatch, R-Utah, whose panel has jurisdiction over much of any health care package, says the chamber will take a more deliberative approach aiming at 51 votes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Last week’s legislative victories — finishing an omnibus spending bill and getting the rollback of the 2010 health care law through the House — are the foundation for the months of battles to come on Capitol Hill. 

Appropriators can begin to turn their attention toward the first full fiscal year of Donald Trump’s presidency, but their Senate colleagues will also have to deal with the procedural morass that comes with trying to reinvent the health care system through budget reconciliation.