Paul D Ryan

James Clyburn: Live at the Comedy Cellar
House majority whip kicks off International Joke Day with a 3-joke set (on Twitter)

Despite his best efforts, there is probably no Netflix standup special in House Majority Whip James E. Clyburn’s future. (Courtesy Rep. James E. Clyburn via Twitter)

We may be weeks removed from Father’s Day but that didn’t discourage House Majority Whip James E. Clyburn from unleashing a torrent of dad jokes so corny his district now qualifies for ethanol subsidies.

The South Carolina Democrat logged on to Twitter dot com on Monday to rattle off some turtle-themed material in celebration of International Joke Day. His jokes included gems like this:

Trump escalates trade tussle with India, putting U.S. farmers at risk — again
‘We’ve been very good to our allies,’ POTUS says amid warnings of economic damage

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi addresses a joint session of Congress as then-Speaker Paul D. Ryan and then-Vice President Joe Biden, watch on June 8, 2016. Three years later, he is in a trade spat with President Donald Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

ANALYSIS — Of the many trade wars Donald Trump has launched since becoming president, his relatively quiet and in-the-weeds one with India had flown mostly below the radar. No more.

GOP lawmakers and analysts worry that those most impacted will be the American farmers who send nuts and fruits to India, as well the U.S. firms that export aircraft and machinery there. Voters who make a living in both sectors are already leery of Trump’s trade tactics, making an escalation with India dicey politics as he revs up his re-election campaign.

Democratic voters are channeling Mick Jagger
‘I can’t get no satisfaction,’ Jagger sang — and Dems are starting to agree

A quarter of Democrats don’t like what their party is doing in the House, according to the latest Winning the Issues survey. They’re channeling Mick Jagger, Winston writes. (Charles McQuillan/Getty Images file photo)

OPINION — “I can’t get no satisfaction,” sang Mick Jagger. Apparently, neither can the majority of the country’s voters. So says our latest Winning the Issues survey, conducted May 31-June 1.

“Are you satisfied or not satisfied with what the Democratic majority in the House of Representatives has done so far?” That was the neutral question we asked voters in the survey, trying to get a handle on just how the new Democrat-led house is doing. In essence, we were asking people to rate whether Speaker Nancy Pelosi and her new majority had met their expectations in these first six months.

Hyde amendment, other abortion riders in the spending limelight
Democrats set for showdown with Republicans, administration

Connecticut Rep. Rosa DeLauro opposes the Hyde amendment, but says it needs to be maintained for the spending bills to be signed into law. {Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The debate surrounding abortion access is about to spill over from the campaign trail to Capitol Hill as lawmakers begin debating must-pass appropriations bills.

Starting Wednesday, the House will take up a nearly $1 trillion spending package written by Democrats that would roll back Trump administration anti-abortion policies, including restrictions barring health clinics from recommending abortion services and preventing U.S. foreign assistance to aid groups that perform or promote abortions.

Congressional pay raise amendments roil House
Five House lawmakers have offered amendments that would bar funding for a cost of living increase for members of Congress

House Rules Chairman Jim McGovern, D-Mass., will navigate the proposals to keep congressional pay stagnant. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A potential pay raise for Congress is stirring up debate on Capitol Hill, and with funding for the Legislative Branch on deck for floor action next week, at least four proposals to keep lawmaker pay frozen are on the table.

Five House lawmakers have offered amendments that would bar funding for a cost of living increase for members of Congress. The three Republicans and two Democrats are raising opposition to House appropriators excluding language barring cost-of-living raises in both the Financial Services and Legislative Branch fiscal 2020 spending bills.

America is about to find out if ‘Lunch Bucket Joe’ is a man of steel
Biden’s first big test will come in Miami

When the Democrats hold their first debate in June, Joe Biden could cement his front-runner status — or he could leave voters wondering whether he belongs there at all, Winston writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

OPINION — With Memorial Day in the rearview mirror, the next political destination for the Democratic presidential pack of contenders is the first two-night debate scheduled for June 26-27 in Miami. Twenty of the qualifying candidates are expected to take the stage hoping to walk away with an attention-getting debate performance that will propel them into the spotlight in what is a ridiculously crowded field.

Nineteen have everything to gain.

Union Pub is like the ‘Matthew McConaughey of Capitol Hill’
Through renovations and name changes, beery refuge on the Senate side keeps staying the same

Patrons gather in the dining room of Union Pub on Wednesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Settled on the Senate side, a couple of blocks northeast of the Capitol, and nearly centered between the Hart Building and Union Station, sits a beery refuge that seems miles away.

“We’re in the business of hospitality and having a good time. We’re not in the business of trying to extend any kind of political discourse or our political feelings,” says Union Pub owner Matt Weiss.

Alice Rivlin, first CBO chief and Clinton budget director, dies

Alice Rivlin, the founding director of the Congressional Budget Office, former director of the Office of Management and Budget and a member of the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform, died Tuesday at the age of 88. (Scott J. Ferrell/CQ Roll Call)

Alice M. Rivlin, an economist, budget and health care expert respected on both sides of the aisle and the first director of the Congressional Budget Office, died Tuesday at the age of 88 after a battle with cancer.

The Brookings Institution, where she served as a senior fellow, confirmed Rivlin’s death.

Iowa's David Young wants a rematch against Cindy Axne
Republican seeks comeback after bid for third term failed by 2 points last fall

Former Rep. David Young has announced a big for his old seat. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Iowa Rep. David Young is back for a rematch in Iowa’s 3rd District, which he lost to Democrat Cindy Axne by 2 points in 2018. 

“The policies advocated by Cindy Axne and Speaker Nancy Pelosi in this current Congress are harming Iowa’s families by hurting our economy and rights,” Young said in a statement Monday evening. “Iowans deserve better from their current representative.” 

Atheist prayers can be barred by House chaplain, appeals court says
D.C. Circuit Court cites interpretation of House rules that say prayers must be religious

Rev. Patrick J. Conroy, chaplain of the House of Representatives, prevailed in legislative prayer litigation on Friday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House chaplain scored a legal victory on Good Friday, when a federal appeals court ruled he could not be ordered to allow a self-described atheist to offer a secular prayer to the House of Representatives.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit sided with Rev. Patrick J. Conroy, in his official capacity as the House chaplain, and the chamber itself in litigation brought by Dan Barker, co-president of the Freedom From Religion Foundation and a former minister. Barker alleged Conroy improperly rejected a request to have him serve as guest chaplain.