Pete Sessions

House Democrats Tank Two Suspension Bills
Pelosi: Bill not problematic, suspension is

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., participates in the House Democrats' news conference on health care reform in the Capitol on Thursday, July 20, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Republicans hoping to quickly clear some must-pass items from their to-do list before August recess brought up two bills Monday under a fast-track procedure only to have Democrats shoot them down.

Both an intelligence reauthorization bill and legislation renewing funding for a veterans’ health program were brought to the House floor under suspension of the rules, a process that requires two-thirds support for passage and bypasses. Both failed.

House to Take Up Immigration Enforcement Bills
No Democratic support expected

Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., arrives for the House Republican Conference meeting in the Capitol on Tuesday, May 2, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

For the first time since Donald Trump took office, the Republican-led House is expected to vote this week on two immigration enforcement bills — but it’s unclear whether they will reach the president who pledged to get tough on undocumented immigrants. 

The bills, introduced Thursday by House Judiciary Chairman Robert W. Goodlatte, R-Va., are stand-alone versions of provisions included in a more comprehensive enforcement measure approved by Goodlatte’s committee in May.

Word on the Hill: Democrats Pick Impeachment Over Alcohol
Survey asked if people would give up drinking for Trump’s impeachment

Scott Preston, center, and other guests watch the final presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton at Capitol Lounge in Washington on Oct. 18. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A solid majority of Democrats said they would give up alcohol for the remainder of their lives if it meant President Donald Trump would be impeached tomorrow, according to a survey conducted by Detox.net.

The website, which works to help drug and alcohol addicts get sober, asked more than 1,000 Americans what they would give up drinking for. Seventy-three percent of Democrats surveyed said they would choose impeachment over alcohol. Only 17 percent of Republicans who took the survey said the same.

Word on the Hill: The Week Ahead
Annual softball game is Wednesday

From left, Alabama Rep. Martha Roby, Florida Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand and West Virginia Sen. Shelley Moore Capito check out the media team as they prepare to play in the Congressional Women's Softball Game last year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Last week closed on a positive and inspirational bipartisan note at the 56th annual Roll Call Congressional Baseball Game.

This week’s Congressional Women’s Softball Game, which pits female lawmakers against female members of the D.C. press corps, is expected to have the same sense of esprit de corps.

Lessons From Dad: House Members Talk About Their Fathers

Dodd-Frank Repeal Set Up for House Passage
Rules Committee allows only five amendments

Rep. Jim McGovern, D-Mass., is not a big fan of the Dodd-Frank repeal bill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

A massive bill to repeal the Dodd-Frank financial law and allow better-capitalized banks to opt out of much of government regulation is heading to the House floor for a final vote on passage that is expected Thursday.

Over Democratic objections, the House Rules Committee on Tuesday allowed only five amendments that appeared to be uncontroversial plus a manager’s amendment to be considered, and it declined to allow a hearing for a proposal to reinstate the Depression-era Glass-Steagall Act.

Children’s Disabilities Inform McMorris Rodgers and Hassan
Diverging views on health care shaped by personal experience

New Hampshire Sen. Maggie Hassan credits her son Ben, who has cerebral palsy, as the reason she got into politics. Also pictured, husband Thomas and daughter Meg. (Courtesy Julian Russell)

19 House Races Shift Toward Democrats
List of competitive seats grows amid shifts against president’s party

New Jersey Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen’s race for re-election has switched from Solid Republican to Likely Republican. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The midterm elections are still nearly a year and a half away, and the political dynamics could yet change, but we shouldn’t ignore the fact that history and the current environment are merging together for a potentially great set of elections for Democrats in November 2018. 

The president’s party has lost House seats in 18 of the last 20 midterm elections, and it’s lost an average of 33 seats in those 18 elections. Democrats need to gain 24 seats in order to take back the majority. 

Nancy Pelosi Misses George W. Bush
House minority leader says she’d work with Republicans on health care if repeal is off the table

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said she and President George W. Bush did work work together despite disagreements (file photo CQ Roll Call).

Former NFL Player Colin Allred to Challenge Pete Sessions
Hillary Clinton won the district in 2016 while Democrats didn’t put up a serious challenger for House

Colin Allred played for the Tennessee Titans in the NFL before serving as a special assistant at the Department of Housing and Urban Development during the Obama administration under Secretary Julian Castro, a former mayor of San Antonio. (colinallred.com)

Former NFL linebacker Colin Allred announced Wednesday he would challenge Texas Rep. Pete Sessions in 2018.

Allred, now a civil rights attorney, told the Dallas Morning News that he was inspired by the grassroots energy he saw after the election of President Donald Trump last year.