Peter T King

GOP Lawmakers Stand by Trump as Majority of Americans Oppose His Re-Election
Economist/YouGov survey shows strong disapproval, unfavorables

President Donald Trump points to his ears as he tries to hear shouted questions from reporters while departing the White House for Camp David on Sept. 8. (Win McNamee/Getty Images File Photo)

A new survey indicates a majority of Americans doubt President Donald Trump’s honesty, view him as a weak leader and don’t want him to run again. But Republican lawmakers say he isn’t a drag on their agenda and predict he will be a formidable candidate in 2020.

Fifty-six percent of respondents in the latest Economist/YouGov survey were so put off by the commander in chief they wanted him to opt against a re-election bid. The results were not kind to Trump, with 54 percent saying they either somewhat or strongly disapproved of how the president is doing his job, while 39 percent approved.

Could More House Retirements Imperil GOP Majority in 2018?
Retirements of three moderates spark fears about more leaving

Pennsylvania Rep. Charlie Dent’s decision makes the race for his 15th District seat more competitive. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

House retirements are a staple of each election cycle. But the decision by three moderate Republicans not to seek re-election is worrying party members, already nervous about holding the majority in 2018.

“You hate to have an open seat in what you know is going to be a bad year,” said Oklahoma Rep. Tom Cole, a former chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee.

Money Is There to Deal with Hurricane Damage, Pence Says
VP: Officials ‘truly believe’ ample federal funds are on hand

Vice President Mike Pence (far right, seated at table) sits at the head of the table on Sunday in the White House Situation Room as senior officials discussed Hurricane Harvey. President Donald Trump was at Camp David, and is pictured on the right video screen. (White House photo)

Vice President Mike Pence said Monday the federal government has adequate funding on hand to deal with the historic flooding and damage done by Hurricane Harvey, possibly looking to tamp down concerns that Congress could get into a spending fight over the cost of the storm’s aftermath.

Lawmakers from hard-hit Texas and Louisiana say they expect Congress will have to add a Hurricane Harvey aid bill to its packed autumn agenda. But Pence told a Houston television station that could be unnecessary.

King Won’t Hold Cruz and Cornyn Votes on Sandy Against Texas
Cruz spokeswoman says Sandy bill was ‘chock-full of pork’

Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y. said New York won't abandon Texas even though its senators voted against emergency funding in 2012 for New York and New Jersey. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

New York Rep. Peter T. King said New York won’t hold Texas responsible for its senators’ vote against aid to Superstorm Sandy when it comes time to vote for emergency aid for Hurricane Harvey.

King tweeted that despite “Ted Cruz & his Texas cohorts” voting against emergency aid for New York and New Jersey after the two states were devastated by Sandy in 2012, he would vote to assist Texas.

White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus Is Out
Trump announces that he has named Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly as successor

White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus is out as President Donald Trump’s chief of staff.  (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

By STEPHANIE AKIN and JOHN T. BENNETTUpdated at 7:20 p.m. President Donald Trump has named Homeland Security Secretary John F. Kelly as his new White House chief of staff, replacing an embattled Reince Priebus.

Trump’s announcement came after a week of turmoil in the White House that had prompted fervent speculation Priebus would be the next to go. But Priebus’s job has been in question almost since the beginning when he was given the almost impossible goal of uniting disparate ideological factions within the Trump administration and serving as a bridge to establishment Republicans.  

One Dollar, One Name to Recognize Gun Violence Victims
Robin Kelly wants a vote on gun control legislation

Illinois Rep. Robin Kelly says pressure from the National Rifle Association is keeping House Republican leadership from allowing votes on gun violence. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When Rep. Robin Kelly rose to speak on the House floor Thursday morning, she carried a list of 50 names — all victims of gun violence.

“I’ve begged — I’ve pleaded — I’ve screamed — I’ve cried and I even ground the people’s House to a halt with last year’s historic sit-in,” the Illinois Democrat said.

Peter King to Senate: Slow Your Roll on Health Care Bill
‘It’s wrong to pass something for the sake of passing it,’ GOP congressman says

Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., said it would be better to pass piecemeal legislation to “repeal what we can” of the 2010 health care law. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican Rep. Peter King criticized GOP senators’ proposed health care bill for cuts to Medicaid and said there was no rush to get legislation passed.

The New York congressman criticized the “severe cuts” to the health care program that aids low-income people and people with disabilities in an interview with CNN Wednesday night.

11 Things I Think I Think After the Special Elections
Lessons from the Georgia and South Carolina races

Jon Ossoff supporters at the Georgia Democrat’s election night watch party are stunned as CNN calls the state’s 6th District race for Republican Karen Handel on Tuesday night. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

One of the best parts about covering elections is that there is a final result. What seems like an endless stream of campaigning and ads and analysis finally comes to an end every time with vote tallies to digest until the next round.

President Donald Trump and the Republicans continue to play with electoral fire, but the GOP pulled off two more special election victories; this time in Georgia’s 6th District and South Carolina’s 5th District. As with the previous results in Kansas and Montana, there are enough tidbits in each result to formulate whatever conclusion helps you sleep better at night.

Trump Twitter Feed Still Mum on Comey Testimony
Anticipate live-Tweet attack yet to materialize

President Donald Trump has a history of using Twitter to state his mind. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

There’s only one thing more highly anticipated in Washington than what former FBI Director James Comey will say Thursday during his first public appearance since President Trump fired him.

It’s what — and if — the president will tweet.

8 Things I Think I Think After the Georgia Special Primary
There’s never just one takeaway

The June runoff between Jon Ossoff and Karen Handel in Georgia’s 6th District is rated a toss-up by Inside Elections with Nathan L. Gonzales. (Photos by Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

My family sat down for dinner at a nice Amish family’s house in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, on Tuesday night, less than two hours before the polls closed in Georgia’s 6th District. And Jon Ossoff’s name didn’t come up once. That’s not surprising, but it is what happens when special elections collide with Spring Break.

The most-watched special election of the cycle (until the next one) ended with the young Georgia Democrat finishing first with 48 percent, in the all-party primary but short of the what he needed to win former Republican Rep. Tom Price’s seat outright. Former Georgia Secretary of State Karen Handel finished second with almost 20 percent and both candidates move on to the June 20 runoff.