podcasts

Podcast: What We Learned from 2017’s Special Elections
The Big Story, Episode 58

Campaign workers decorate the ballroom with balloons for Jon Ossoff's election night watch party in Atlanta, Ga., on special election day, Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Podcast: The Budget Disconnect Within the Trump Administration
Budget Tracker Extra, Episode 22

Eric Ueland, staff director for the Senate Budget Committee, is one of many high-profile staffers leaving Capitol Hill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As lawmakers start to work on fiscal 2018 spending bills, some Cabinet secretaries who appear before them are doing little to defend President Donald Trump’s budget request, say CQ budget reporters Kellie Mejdrich and Paul M. Krawzak. Also, there are hints that appropriators are willing to consider giving the Pentagon even more money than what Trump is requesting.

Word on the Hill: The Week Ahead
Annual softball game is Wednesday

From left, Alabama Rep. Martha Roby, Florida Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand and West Virginia Sen. Shelley Moore Capito check out the media team as they prepare to play in the Congressional Women's Softball Game last year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Last week closed on a positive and inspirational bipartisan note at the 56th annual Roll Call Congressional Baseball Game.

This week’s Congressional Women’s Softball Game, which pits female lawmakers against female members of the D.C. press corps, is expected to have the same sense of esprit de corps.

Podcast: Inside the Senate’s Secret Health Care Talks
The Week Ahead, Episode 58

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Capping Medicaid payments is just one of several ideas Republican senators are kicking around as they struggle to fashion a health care bill to overhaul Obamacare, says CQ Roll Call health care reporter Kerry Young, who provides the latest developments.

 

Podcast: Democrats’ Big Test in Georgia
The Big Story, Episode 58

Democrat John Ossoff, left, faces off June 20 against Republican competitor Karen Handel, right, for Georgia’s 6th District congressional seat.

Roll Call political correspondent Simone Pathè explains how the most expensive House race in history, next week's contest to fill an open seat in suburban Atlanta, has already revealed plenty about the new congressional electoral landscape in the age of Trump.

Show Notes:

Podcast: The Big Chill for Trump Budget
Budget Tracker Extra, Episode 21

Lawmakers are starting to work on next fiscal year’s federal spending plan with nearly 30 hearings coming up — even though they’ve given a thumbs down to President Trump’s budget request and have no idea how much they can spend, says Budget Tracker editor David Lerman.

Podcast: In Comey We Trust?
The Week Ahead, Episode 57

Podcast: Senate Picks Up Pace on GOP Health Care Bill
The Big Story, Episode 57

President Donald Trump with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky. (CQ Roll Call/File Photo)

After a series of fits and starts, the Senate is starting to clear a path so it can consider legislation dismantling Obamacare, say CQ Roll Call’s Jason Dick and Ed Pesce. They review how the Senate got there and what’s next.

Trump to Nominate Wray for FBI Director
President calls former assistant AG in Bush administration ‘a man of impeccable credentials’

Christopher Wray. (Photo Courtesy King and Spalding law firm)

Updated at 11:39 a.m.President Donald Trump plans to nominate former Assistant Attorney General Christopher Wray to be the next FBI director, he announced in a Wednesday morning tweet. 

Trump dubbed Wray, who was assistant AG in charge of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division from 2003 to 2005 under the George W. Bush administration, “a man of impeccable credentials.”

Podcast: Lawmakers Could Seek Another Funding Shortcut
Budget Tracker Extra, Episode 20

Lawmakers return to the Hill this week with a slew of committee hearings on the fiscal 2018 spending bills, say CQ budget reporters Ryan McCrimmon and Jennifer Shutt. There’s just one problem: lawmakers will be working without knowing how much they can spend.