President Donald Trump

Capitol Ink | Vandal in Chief

DACA recipients attending SOTU don’t want their legal status traded for the wall
‘I refuse to trade my community for a status,’ El Paso DACA recipient Senaida Navar says

Rep. Veronica Escobar, D-Texas, far left, brought Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program recipient Senaida Navar as her guest to State of the Union address on Tuesday. Navar said she does not want her legal status traded for a border wall. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Several Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program recipients attending the State of the Union Tuesday as guests of House Democrats said they do not want their legal status traded for a border wall. 

President Donald Trump tried to end the DACA program, which provides young undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children temporary legal status, but federal courts have so far blocked him from doing so. During various times over the past two years, Trump has floated trading statutory protections for DACA recipients — sometimes permanent, other times time temporary — for funding for a southern border wall.

‘Have I not been clear about the wall?’ Pelosi signals Trump still won’t get what he wants
Three weeks of negotiations not likely to result in a Trump-friendly agreement on border wall funding

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, D-N.Y., reiterated to reporters Friday as a deal to temporarily reopen the government was reached that Democrats remain opposed to a border wall. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS — It took 35 days, but President Donald Trump ultimately caved to Democratic demands that he reopen the government before they’d entertain negotiations on border security. And in 21 more, Trump will have to decide whether to give in again, because he’s not likely to get what he wants.

Trump agreed Friday to back a three-week continuing resolution that will reopen the government through Feb. 15. But he is not giving up on his quest to secure funding for wall along the southern border. 

Trump, congressional leaders agree to open government for three weeks
Deal includes plan for the House and Senate to go to conference on Homeland Security funding bill

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell speaks to reporters in the Capitol on Friday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump and congressional leaders have an agreement to reopen government agencies through Feb. 15, providing a temporary reprieve to federal workers who haven’t been paid in nearly a month.

“We have reached a deal,” Trump said Friday at the top of his Rose Garden remarks — although a short time later he threatened another shutdown if he did not eventually get his way. 

Capitol Ink | Giuliani Rewind

Capitol Ink | Bear Hug

Trump invites moderate Dems to WH for shutdown meeting — but some decline
Blue Dog Coalition leaders Lou Correa and Stephanie Murphy will not attend

Rep. Lou Correa, D-Calif., is rejecting an invitation to meet with President Donald Trump at the White House Tuesday to discuss border security and how to end the partial government shutdown, saying he'd be happy to talk once government is reopen. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump has invited some more moderate House Democrats to the White House Tuesday to discuss border security and how to end the partial government shutdown, but at least two of the invited members do not plan to attend. 

Trump’s official schedule for Tuesday lists a 12:30 p.m. meeting with unnamed members of Congress. The  White House has not announced other details.

Capitol Ink | Character Witness

Democrats could sue if Trump declares national emergency over wall, Hoyer says
Majority leader says technology, more personnel at border would be more effective than barrier

House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer, D-Md., applauds for reporters who used to attend his press briefings as minority leader, during his first briefing of the 116th Congress as majority leader. ( Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer said Democratic leadership has not yet discussed what their reaction would be if President Donald Trump were to follow through on his threat to declare a national emergency on the border to build his wall, but he said a lawsuit is certainly a possibility.

Hoyer reiterated Democrats’ opposition to a border wall and said they’re not really interested in alternative barriers either. He said experts have said neither a wall nor fencing is what’s really needed at the border but rather technology, drones and more personnel.

Why the shutdown is a good thing for House Democrats
New majority can spend otherwise slow first few weeks of session messaging on opening government

A sign on Monday announces that the National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden and ice rink are closed due to the partial government shutdown. The standoff between President Donald Trump and Congress over a spending package to fund nine government agencies entered its 18th day Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Democrats don’t want roughly a quarter of the federal government to be shut down, but the situation provides some upsides for the new House majority as the impasse stretches into its 18th day. 

First and foremost, it’s a great messaging opportunity to highlight the differences between Democratic and Republican governing strategies.