Presidential race

Jim Jordan for Oversight Chairman? ‘We’ll See’
Former Freedom Caucus chairman leaves open bid for Chaffetz gavel

Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan, center, is the highest ranking Freedom Caucus member on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Ohio Republican Rep. Jim Jordan signaled Wednesday he might be interested in leading the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee should current Chairman Jason Chaffetz decide to leave Congress early, as has been speculated since the Utah Republican announced he would not run for re-election in 2018.

“We’ll see if and when that happens,” Jordan said when asked if he would vie for the gavel.

Lawmakers Wary of Russia’s Ability to Plant Cyber Dirt
Moscow’s alleged meddling not just a thing of the past, officials warn

Maine Sen. Angus King said at a hearing last month on Russian cyber operations that Americans should be concerned about being compromised by fake information planted on their computers, and not just the stealing of emails. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In a brief and largely overlooked exchange between Sen. Marco Rubio and America’s top spy during a January hearing about Russia’s alleged election meddling, the Florida Republican sketched out what he fears could be the next front in the hidden wars of cyberspace.

Could Russian hackers, Rubio asked then-Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr., hypothetically gain access to a U.S. lawmaker’s computer, plant criminal evidence on the device of, say, child pornography or money laundering and then tip off law enforcement?

Life After Capitol Hill: Ex-Staffer Is Connecting D.C. to Silicon Valley
Jamie Corley founded ‘The Bridge’ to serve as a translator

Jamie Corley moved from D.C. to San Francisco in 2015. (Courtesy Jamie Corley)

Is life after Capitol Hill located 3,000 miles away? One former staffer thinks so and wants to bridge the gap between Capitol Hill and Silicon Valley.

“I think a lot of good can come out of [it] if Silicon Valley and Washington D.C. learn how to effectively work together,” said Jamie Corley, 30.

Trump Appeals for a Little Respect
U.S. president: ISIS attack will have ‘big effect’ on French election

President Donald Trump enjoyed the view from the cab of a big rig truck when he welcomed members of American Trucking Associations to the White House in March. (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

The president of the United States, after 91 turbulent days in office, wants a little R-E-S-P-E-C-T.

Donald Trump is coming up on his 100th day as the country’s chief executive, and he is expressing frustration that many are judging what typically is a “honeymoon period” for presidents in less-favorable way than he is.

Chaffetz Challenger Outraises Him By More Than 3-1
Democrat Kathryn Allen raised $561,000 since getting into the race in last month

Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, conducts the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee meeting to organize for the 115th Congress on Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz’s Democratic challenger outraised him by a more than 3-1 margin in the first quarter of the year.

Kathryn Allen, a physician who announced in March she would challenge Chaffetz, chairman of the House Oversight Committee, raised $561,000 compared with Chaffetz’s $171,000, The Associated Press reported.

Classified Information Complicates Nunes Ethics Probe
Results of investigation may not be revealed at all

House Intelligence Chairman Devin Nunes is currently the subject of an inquiry by the House Ethics Committee. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The outcome of an ethics investigation surrounding House Intelligence Chairman Devin Nunes’ disclosure of classified information might never see the light of day, depending on how it’s handled.

The results of that inquiry by the House Ethics Committee may not be revealed for months — or at all — because it centers around disclosure of classified information, ethics experts say.

There’s More Than One Takeaway From the Kansas Special Election
‘11 things I think I think’

Kansas Treasurer Ron Estes pulled out a 53-46 percent victory to keep the 4th District in Republican hands. (Courtesy Ron Estes for Congress Facebook Page)

After a few months in the electoral desert, we finally have election results to digest from a competitive race, albeit an unexpected one.

State Treasurer Ron Estes pulled out a 53-46 percent win to keep Kansas’ 4th District in Republican hands. The 7-point victory margin is shocking considering Donald Trump carried the Wichita-based seat by 27 points in last year’s presidential race.

Estes a Stalwart but Unflashy Conservative
Kansas congressman-elect should fit comfortably within House GOP mainstream

Kansas Rep.-elect Ron Estes says the House Republican health care bill ”didn’t go far enough.” (Screenshot: Ron Estes for Congress)

Ron Estes, who eked out a victory in a surprisingly close special election in Kansas’s 4th District Tuesday, is a stalwart but unflashy conservative with a background in engineering and state finance. 

Estes, the state treasurer of Kansas, succeeds Mike Pompeo who resigned from the House on Jan. 23 to become director of the CIA.

Three Veterans Announce They’re Running for House as Democrats
Two of them are running in GOP-held districts that Hillary Clinton won

Air Force veteran Chrissy Houlahan, left, who served as cheif operating officer and chief financial officer for Springboard Collaborative, announced she's running against Rep. Ryan Costello in Pennsylvania (Courtesy Chrissy Houlahan for Congress)

Three military veterans are announcing Tuesday they’re running as Democrats against Republican incumbents.

In California's 50th Congressional District, retired Navy SEAL Josh Butner will challenge Republican Rep. Duncan Hunter.

Tense Senate Confirms Gorsuch to Supreme Court
Colorado jurist will restore conservative tilt as Scalia replacement

Neil Gorsuch is the next associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 1:41 p.m. | The Senate confirmed Judge Neil Gorsuch as the next Supreme Court justice on Friday on a mostly party-line vote, 54-45. Democrats Joe Manchin III of West Virginia, Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota and Joe Donnelly of Indiana joined all Republicans present in voting to confirm. Republican Johnny Isakson of Georgia did not vote.

Gorsuch was supported by the fewest number of senators since Justice Clarence Thomas was confirmed in 1991 on a 52-48 vote.