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Supreme Court Lets Trump Go Ahead With Most of Travel Ban
President: ‘A clear victory for our national security’

Immigration rights activists chant during their May Day march in Washington to the White House to voice opposition to President Donald Trump's immigration policies on May 1. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Supreme Court on Monday allowed the Trump administration to implement much of its revised travel ban, but also agreed to review the legality of the controversial executive order in October.

The justices lifted injunctions from two federal appeals courts that had blocked the order, which seeks to stop foreign travelers from six majority-Muslim countries for 90 days and suspend all refugees from entering the United States for 120 days. The rulings had stymied one of President Donald Trump’s major policy initiatives in his first months in office — moves that he argued are key for national security.

Security Boost in House Legislative Branch Bill Approved
More funding for Capitol Police and sergeant-at-arms, among others

Capitol Police would get a boost from the Legislative Branch spending bill being considered in the House. (Tom Williams/Roll Call File Photo)

House appropriators have approved a fiscal 2018 Legislative Branch spending bill that would boost security both at the Capitol and in members’ districts.

The House Legislative Branch Appropriations Subcommittee at a brief meeting on Friday approved by voice vote the $3.58 billion fiscal 2018 Legislative Branch measure. No amendments were offered.

Court Allows Some of Travel Ban, Will Decide Legality Later
The court also announced decisions on immigration detention, gun rights, same-sex marriage, separation of church and state

Activists hold signs during a protest outside the White House in March against President Donald Trump’s second executive order banning travel from some Muslim-majority countries. (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

The Supreme Court on Monday allowed the Trump administration to implement much of its revised travel ban, but also agreed to review the legality of the controversial executive order in October.

The justices lifted injunctions from two federal appeals courts that had blocked the order, which seeks to stop foreign travelers from six majority-Muslim countries for 90 days and suspends all refugees from entering the United States for 120 days. The rulings had stymied one of President Donald Trump’s major policy initiatives in his first months in office — moves that he argued are key for national security.

Poll: Younger Republicans More Liberal on Immigration
Also more likely to support same-sex marriage than older Republicans

Immigration rights activists rally in Dupont Circle in Washington before their May Day march to the White House to voice opposition to President Donald Trump's immigration policies. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A new poll shows younger Republicans hold more liberal views on immigration than older members of their party.

The American Values Atlas conducted by the Public Religion Research Institute showed that 60 percent of Republicans between the ages of 18 and 29 believe immigrants face a lot of discrimination in the United States, The Associated Press reported. This is compared to 41 percent of Republicans of all ages.

Analysis: Mike Pence Works the Trenches
Vice president plays small ball, seeking to shore up support

Vice President Mike Pence greets tourists in the Capitol Rotunda on May 2. He has been busily addressing key issue-specific groups, trying to shore up support with key voters. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Donald Trump and Mike Pence are the most effective pitchers in the Republican bullpen. The president has the starpower and gets the headlines, but the vice president’s emerging role could be just as valuable.

Trump is the flame-throwing closer with one pitch: his signature sharp rhetoric that metaphorically is his political fastball. But Pence’s recent public appearances showcase his role as the in-the-trenches long reliever who huddles with GOP members and reassures key constituent groups, and could be even more valuable.

Scalia’s Unique Relationship with ‘Doppelganger’ Who Plays Him
Edward Gero recalls meeting with the late Supreme Court justice

Edward Gero as Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia in “The Originalist,” which runs from July 7 to 30 at Arena Stage. (Courtesy C. Stanley Photography)

The late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia’s legacy, in part, lies with one man who had a very unique friendship with him: Edward Gero who plays Scalia in “The Originalist,” which returns July 7 to Arena Stage.

“I feel myself, in a way, representing the legacy of Scalia and all those great characteristics that he had as an intellectual, as a lover of language, as a grammarian, as a philosopher,” Gero said.

Karen Handel Proves Third Time’s the Charm
Georgia Republican heads to Congress after 2 losing bids for higher office

Karen Handel gives her victory speech to supporters in Atlanta on Tuesday, as her husband Steve Handel looks on. (Jessica McGowan/Getty Images)

Republican Karen Handel comes to Congress after a 28-year career with a diverse portfolio of public- and private-sector jobs ranging from overseeing elections as Georgia’s secretary of state to heading the Fulton County Board of Commissioners to serving as the vice president of the Susan G. Komen Foundation, which supports breast cancer research.

Handel defeated Democrat Jon Ossoff 52 percent to 48 percent in Tuesday’s 6th District special election runoff to replace former Rep. Tom Price, who vacated the seat to become secretary of Health and Human Services.

Republican Ralph Norman Wins Close Race in South Carolina
GOP winner likely to join House Freedom Caucus

Republican Ralph Norman won the special election in South Carolina’s 5th District (Simone Pathé/CQ Roll Call)

Republican Ralph Norman had a good birthday Tuesday night, winning the special election to fill South Carolina’s 5th District seat, albeit by a closer-than-expected margin.

Norman defeated Democrat Archie Parnell 51 percent to 48 percent, with 100 percent of precincts reporting, according to The Associated Press. 

Scalise, Shot at Baseball Practice, Known as Behind-the-Scenes Mover
Republican Whip has been credited with moving signature bills, working with Trump

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, right, celebrates the Republicans’ win in last year’s Congressional Baseball Game with Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

On the Hill, Rep. Steve Scalise works behind the scenes to convince other Republicans to line up behind his Party’s agenda.

But on the baseball field during the annual Congressional game, he plays up the middle: He’s the second baseman.

Take Five: John Rutherford
Florida Republican is frustrated watching divisions in the caucus play out

Florida Rep. John Rutherford says playing golf leaves him wanting to bend his clubs. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Freshman Rep. John Rutherford, 64, a Florida Republican, talks about his days as a sheriff, differences within the Republican Party, and playing tennis.

Q: What has surprised you about Congress so far?