religion

Hyde amendment, other abortion riders in the spending limelight
Democrats set for showdown with Republicans, administration

Connecticut Rep. Rosa DeLauro opposes the Hyde amendment, but says it needs to be maintained for the spending bills to be signed into law. {Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The debate surrounding abortion access is about to spill over from the campaign trail to Capitol Hill as lawmakers begin debating must-pass appropriations bills.

Starting Wednesday, the House will take up a nearly $1 trillion spending package written by Democrats that would roll back Trump administration anti-abortion policies, including restrictions barring health clinics from recommending abortion services and preventing U.S. foreign assistance to aid groups that perform or promote abortions.

You’ve seen the Freedom Caucus in action, now read the book
Author, in his new book, explains how hard-line conservative group changed the legislative game

From left, House Freedom Caucus members Dave Brat, R-Va., Mo Brooks, R-Ala., and Mark Meadows, R-N.C., arrive for a news conference in February 2017. In a new book, Matthew Green, argues that the Republicans who conspired against Speaker John A. Boehner in 2015 pioneered something new in American history. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Matthew Green, a professor of politics at the Catholic University of America, argues in his new book, “Legislative Hardball: The House Freedom Caucus and the Power of Threat-Making in Congress,” that the House Republicans who conspired against Speaker John A. Boehner in 2015 pioneered something new in American history.

Here’s an edited transcript of his interview with CQ Roll Call.

Freshman lashes out after House ethics rules bar promoting bone marrow drive
Rep. Katie Porter says rules favor lobbyists and interests over ‘ordinary people’

Rep. Katie Porter, D-Calif., is frustrated that House ethics rules prohibit her from promoting bone marrow donor drives that could save a constituent's life. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When a seriously ill constituent asked if Rep. Katie Porter could raise awareness of potentially life-saving bone marrow drives in her Southern California district this month, a simple constituent service turned into a sticky House ethics issue.

Now Porter is questioning whether rules designed to prevent misuse of taxpayer dollars need to be reviewed.

Democrat criticizes Rep. Duncan Hunter for posing with enemy corpse
In defending Navy SEAL accused of war crimes, congressman says posing with enemy dead was common practice

Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., claimed on Saturday that he and other Marines posed for photos with dead enemies when they served in the Middle East in the early 2000s. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Democratic opponent of Rep. Duncan Hunter battered him for admitting that he posed for a photo with a slain enemy combatant while serving with the U.S. Marines in the early 2000s.

Hunter, a Republican, won re-election over Democrat Ammar Campa-Najjar in California’s 50th District in 2018 despite being indicted on 60 counts related to spending more than $250,000 in campaign cash for personal expenses that included vacations to Italy and Hawaii, dental work, and flying his family’s pet rabbit across the country.

Sharing info on potential sponsors of unaccompanied children stalled border funding
House Democrats sought to prevent HHS from sharing info with DHS

Homeland Security Appropriations Subcommittee Chairwoman Lucille Roybal-Allard, D-Calif., has been critical of the information-sharing pact, particularly after reports of ICE agents arresting potential sponsors based on their immigration status, even those without criminal records. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said May 16 that she hoped the emerging disaster aid supplemental would also carry funding to care for children and families pouring over the border in record numbers, it seemed like a fait accompli.

But as the days turned into a week, something was clearly wrong. And suddenly, Senate leaders agreed to drop billions of dollars the Trump administration wanted to address what both sides called a humanitarian crisis at the border, in the interest of getting the $19.1 billion disaster aid bill over the finish line.

LGBTQ Equality Act passes House, pushing back on Trump’s religious freedom policies
Democrats and advocacy groups are attempting to counteract these policies through the courts and legislation

Democratic Caucus Vice Chair Rep. Katherine Clark, D-Mass., poses with a rainbow flag at the House steps after the vote to pass the Equality Act on Friday, May 17, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Growing tensions over the Trump administration’s policies that aim to strengthen religious freedom protections for health care workers have led to a partisan tug-of-war playing out in the House.

The Trump administration has tried to strengthen religious liberty protections through numerous policies over the past several months. Those include providing federal funds to religiously affiliated foster agencies who don’t allow LGBT people to adopt children and broadening religious and moral exemptions for employers who do not want to cover birth control.

How Father Ted outdid Forrest Gump
Notre Dame president popped up everywhere in the 20th century, says director Patrick Creadon

The Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh, center left, joins hands with Martin Luther King Jr. and other civil rights protesters in the 1960s.(Courtesy O’Malley Creadon Productions)

As the Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh was taking the reins at the University of Notre Dame in 1952, I was being born less than a mile away at St. Joseph’s Hospital, just off Notre Dame Avenue in South Bend, Indiana. And while my mother was starting me off in the world, her sister, my Aunt Helen, was beginning what would be a 35-year career as Hesburgh’s personal secretary, for his entire tenure as university president.

So for me, watching “Hesburgh,” the new documentary from ND alum and award-winning filmmaker Patrick Creadon, was like zooming out on the familiar. It was an emotional journey back through not only my own life, but also a tumultuous period for our nation — one that isn’t over yet.

Movie night: The Catholic priest who shepherded civil rights
Political Theater bonus: Episode 72

The Rev. Theodore Hesburgh, center left, with Martin Luther King Jr. and other civil-rights protesters in the 1960s.(Courtesy O’Malley Creadon Productions)

A documentary about the late Notre Dame president Fr. Theodore Hesburgh, a real life “Forrest Gump” who challenged presidents and popes in the last half-century, resonates in today’s turbulent times, the director of the film tells CQ Magazine managing editor Mike Magner, who grew up hearing about Father Ted’s work and causes. The film, directed by Patrick Creadon, explores the challenges Father Ted faced with Republican and Democratic administrations in advancing civil rights. 

Show Notes:

Rep. Rashida Tlaib defends Holocaust, Israel comments against critics
Michigan Democrat accuses Rep. Liz Cheney, others of misconstruing her comments to incite a backlash

Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., defended herself against criticism that comments she made about the Holocaust were anti-Semitic. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Rashida Tlaib defended herself from another series of criticisms that she is anti-Semitic after comments she made about the Holocaust and a one-state solution in Palestine and Israel.

“Once again, Republican leaders and right-wing extremists are spreading outright lies to incite hate,” Denzel McCampbell, a spokesman for the Michigan Democrat, said in a statement Monday, highlighting comments from Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney, a member of Republican leadership, who urged Speaker Nancy Pelosi over the weekend to “take action” to censure Tlaib for what she claimed was “anti-Semitism.”

Mother’s Day can be tough. Here’s how one woman copes
‘I never want to be bitter or jealous of what another friend has,’ says former Hill staffer Chelsea Patterson Sobolik

Chelsea Patterson Sobolik poses with her book “Longing for Motherhood” on Friday. Mother’s Day isn’t always easy, but this policy director has hope. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

While a lot of us will spend Mother’s Day scrolling through Instagram and double-tapping our friends’ “First Mother’s Day! #blessed” posts, Chelsea Patterson Sobolik, a former Hill staffer, will avoid it all.

“I never want to be bitter or jealous of what another friend has,” she says.