Richard M Burr

Photos of the Week: Rain, National Police Week and Smokey Robinson
The week of May 14 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

The dome of the U.S. Capitol is seen through rain drops on the skylight of the Capitol Visitor Center on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A rainy week in Washington is coming to a close (though the rain seems intent on sticking around through the weekend). Some of the events this week on Capitol Hill included: a presidential visit to the GOP policy lunch, testimony from singer-songwriter legend Smokey Robinson, the premiere of Sen. John McCain's HBO documentary and oh, more rain.

Here's the entire week in photos:

Word on the Hill: What’s Buzzing on Capitol Hill?
Jason Mraz and a Beach Boy at the LOC, first lady-less first lady breakfast, and behind the scenes at baseball practice

UNITED STATES - MAY 15: Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C., arrives in the Capitol on the subway for the Senate Republicans' meeting with President Donald Trump on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

We’re all over Capitol Hill and its surrounding haunts looking for good stories. Some of the best are ones we come across while reporting the big stories.

There is life beyond legislating and this is the place for those stories. We look for them, but we don’t find them all. We want to know what you see, too.

Photos of the Week: Haspel Hearing (and Protests), Detainees Return and More
The week of May 7 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

The Service Year Alliance convened on the West Front of the Capitol on Monday in inflatable eagle costumes to call on Congress to expand funding in the 2019 budget for AmeriCorps, the Peace Corps and YouthBuild. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

The focal point of the week of May 7 on Capitol Hill was the series of meetings that Gina Haspel had with senators, as well as the culminating confirmation hearing in front of the Senate Intelligence Committee. Just outside of D.C. on Thursday morning, a scene played out on a tarmac — Secretary of State Mike Pompeoreturned with three American citizens who had been detained in North Korea, and the president was there to greet them.

Here’s the entire week in photos:

Haspel’s CIA Director Confirmation Hearing, in Photos
33-year career intelligence officer faces opposition to lead agency

Gina Haspel, nominee to be director of the Central Intelligence Agency, is sworn in before testifying during her confirmation hearing in the Senate (Select) Intelligence Committee on Wednesday. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

The focal point of the week on Capitol Hill kicked off Wednesday with a series of arrests. The confirmation hearing in front of the Senate Select Intelligence Committee for Gina Haspel to be director of the CIA drew attention from anti-torture protesters and members on both sides of the aisle.

As a 33-year veteran of the intelligence agency, Haspel’s involvement in post-9/11 “enhanced interrogation” tactics has been at the center of the controversy over her nomination.

In Face of May Day Protests, Here’s Where Senators Stand on Labor
See where senators stand on immigration reform, minimum wage and right-to-work

Immigration rights activists rally in Dupont Circle in Washington before their May Day march to the White House to oppose President Donald Trump’s immigration policies on May 1, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Protesters took to the streets this week for May Day demonstrations calling  for better working conditions, higher pay and more compensation.May Day protests usually take place in progressive cities and states and focus on low income workers, immigrants and minimum wage jobs. The politicians representing those places and people don’t always share activist views on labor. Here are what senators from a few states with major protests think about activists’ demands:

Raising the minimum wage:“You can bet Democrats in Congress are going to fight to make $15 minimum wage a reality in this nation, from one end of the country to the other,” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said in a speech on the steps of the Capitol last week, according to Vox.Immigrant workers:“I support further securing our borders; prohibiting hiring of undocumented immigrants by requiring job applicants to present a secure Social Security card,” the New York Democrat told the League of Women Voters in 2010. He also supports “requiring undocumented immigrants to register with the government, pay taxes, and earn legal [status or face deportation.]” Right-to-work laws:“We’re offering the middle class and those struggling to get there a better deal by taking on companies that undermine unions and underpay their workers, and beginning to unwind a rigged system that undermines every worker’s freedom to negotiate with their employer,” Schumer told the Washington Post on fighting Right-to-Work laws.

New Push for Senators to Pay Their Interns
Advocates say the time is right for offices to stop relying on free labor

A majority of Senate offices do not offer paid internships, according to data from nonprofit advocacy group Pay Our Interns. (Illustration by Chris Hale/CQ Roll Call)

Ideas to boost diversity on the Hill have been thrown around, and the numbers are slowly improving. But what if the solution was right in front of everyone, sitting at tiny shared desks in congressional offices?

Paid interns.

Pompeo Confirms Mueller Interview
Secretary of state nominee testified before Senate Foreign Relations panel

CIA Director Mike Pompeo, right, President Donald Trump’s nominee for secretary of State, greets Sen. Richard M. Burr, R-N.C., during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Secretary of State nominee Mike Pompeo told senators at his confirmation hearing Thursday he has been questioned by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III in his investigation into connections between the Trump campaign and Russian operatives.

Specifically, Mueller questioned the current CIA chief on a West Wing conversation last March with President Donald Trump and Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats in which the president reportedly asked Coats to get then-FBI head James B. Comey to drop his investigation into  former national security adviser Michael Flynn.

Burr Says States Should Determine Age Limits on Guns
But says there are points of agreements on gun laws in Congress

Sen.  Richard Burr, R-N.C., right, said he is open to some gun measures but thinks age restrictions should be left to states. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Richard Burr said there are points of “common agreement” in Congress on gun laws, but that states should determine age restrictions on buying weapons.

Speaking to CBS 17 in Wilson, the North Carolina Republican responded to questions about tighter gun legislation in the wake of the shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida, in February.

Lawmakers From High-Export Areas Mum on China Tariffs
White House blames Beijing as one pork state Dem says 'Trump isn’t cutting it'

U.S. and Chinese flags during military leaders' meetings in 2014. Four years later, the two economic giants are exchanging import tariffs amid lawmakers' worries about a trade war. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Mikki L. Sprenkle via Wikimedia Commons)

Lawmakers in states and districts most likely to be affected by the Chinese tariffs on an array of American products from pork to wine to fruits and nuts were noticeably mum Monday on Beijing’s retaliation against the Trump administration’s trade actions.

The Chinese government was unhappy when President Donald Trump decided to impose import penalties of 25 percent on most steel and 10 percent on aluminum coming into the United States. Beijing hit back Monday with $3 billion worth of tariffs on nearly 130 American goods — but members had very little to say about the latest skirmish in the trade brouhaha.

No Snow Day on Capitol Hill Wednesday
Floor votes and hearings are still expected

A worker clears the sidewalks on the East Front of the Capitol in March 2009. Employees of the office of the Architect of the Capitol also will likely be hard at work to keep the Capitol open for business on Wednesday. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Executive agencies might close Wednesday for the snowstorm that’s bearing down on Washington, but it should be closer to business-as-usual on Capitol Hill.

The cold rain and expected changeover to snow is arriving when lawmakers are already safely in the nation’s capital, so the most usual reason to cancel business — flight delays — won’t be an issue.