Rob Wittman

Spanberger, Virginia Democratic Women Could Make a Lot of History
Former CIA agent seeks to upset GOP Rep. Dave Brat to become first woman to represent Virginia's 7th District

Virginia Democratic candidates for Congress, from left, Abigail Spanberger, Jennifer Wexton, and Vangie Williams, prepare to speak during the Women’s Summit in Herndon, Va., on June 23, 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

RICHMOND, Va. — If Democrat Abigail Spanberger beats incumbent Republican Rep. Dave Brat here Tuesday, she’ll become the first woman to represent Virginia’s 7th District, but she might not be the only one making history on Election Day.

The former CIA agent has already defied expectations by turning this reliably GOP district into a Toss-up race, as rated by Inside Elections with Nathan L. Gonzales

Paid Family Leave Could Make It To Next Congress After Midterm Boost
Elections have seen unprecedented push for paid leave

Vangie Williams, the Democratic nominee for Virginia’s 1st District and a mother of six, says her support for paid family leave comes from her experience balancing work while caring for a sick daughter and returning to work shortly after childbirth. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Vangie Williams, a mother of six, was facing foreclosure and a pile of medical bills for her 2-year-old daughter’s rare lung condition when she wrote to her congressman. She wanted help. But she got a form letter, she recalled.

The experience was one of many that convinced the Virginia Democrat several years later to challenge 1st District Republican Rep. Rob Wittman on a platform that includes paid leave so families caring for sick relatives can avoid some of the impossible financial decisions that she faced.  She and her husband ended up tapping out their retirement accounts and losing their home, she said. 

House Not as Antsy About August Recess Delay
GOP leadership position contrasts with Freedom Caucus

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan said his Republican conference was discussing the schedule, including whether to alter the recess calendar. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

UPDATED 5:08 p.m. | House Republican leaders appear content sticking to their planned month-long August recess, but some rank-and-file members say they will push to stay in session if they don’t start ticking items off their to-do list.

House leaders remain in discussions about the schedule, Speaker Paul D. Ryan said Wednesday, a day after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced his chamber would stay in Washington for two extra weeks in August.

Word on the Hill: Ladies Play Ball
Faiths & Politics and Horton’s Kids today

Lawmakers line up for for the National Anthem before the 2013 Congressional Women’s Softball Game. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The ninth annual Congressional Women’s Softball Game is today.

The members’ team goes head to head against the women of the Washington press corps, also known as the Bad News Babes, to raise money for the Young Survivors Coalition, which supports young women with breast cancer.

House GOP Optimistic Ahead of Health Care Vote
‘There were a lot of smiles in the room today’

Speaker of the House Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., leaves a meeting of the House Republican Conference in the Capitol on Thursday before the House plans to vote on the heath care bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By ERIN MERSHON and KERRY YOUNG, CQ Roll Call

House Republicans started celebrating early Thursday, ahead of their vote to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law.

Where the Health Care Whip Count Stands
Count still in flux, but odds look good for Republicans

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, left, said he felt good about where the votes were for the GOP leadership’s health care plan. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

BY LINDSEY MCPHERSON, ERIN MERSHON AND STEPHANIE AKIN

The odds continued to tip in Republicans’ favor on Thursday as they headed toward an afternoon vote to overhaul the health care system.

Photos of the Recess: A Tax Protest, Special Election and 4/20 Event
The weeks of April 10 and April 17 as seen by Roll Call's photographers

A Hill staffer reads a book during the lunch hour on the East Lawn of the Capitol on April 18. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Warm weather punctuated the spring recess in Washington. As congressmen took two weeks back home in their states and districts, some Hill staffers were able to enjoy the sun on lunch breaks and head early to happy hours.

But it wasn't all that quiet on the congressional front. A Tax March on Saturday, April 15 brought protesters to Capitol Hill to demand President Donald Trump release his tax returns. CQ Roll Call hit the road to Atlanta for the special election to fill Tom Price's seat. And back in Washington, the recess neared its end as a 4/20 event resulted in seven arrests for marijuana possession and possession with intent to distribute near the Dirksen Senate Office Building.

Wittman Answers Questions at Public Forum, Constituents Hold Mock Town Hall
Republican congressman says he favors smaller-scale meetings over massive town halls

Rep. Rob Wittman, R-Va., leaves a meeting of the Stafford County Board of Supervisors in Stafford, Va., on April 18, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

STAFFORD, Va. — Rep. Rob Wittman provided an update on congressional affairs to the local governing body here Tuesday evening. It was his fifth constituent meeting of the day.

Meanwhile, just over 30 miles northwest in Nokesville, Virginia, citizens held a mock town hall to discuss the congressman’s voting record.

To Save Millions, Military Grounds Planes Worth Billions
Economics ‘upside down’, expert says

The Air Force has grounded part of its fleet of C-5 Galaxy transport planes. (Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images)

The Air Force has grounded a big portion of its newly refurbished, multibillion-dollar fleet of C-5 Galaxy transport planes, just to avoid spending the relatively small amount of money it costs to fly them. 

In order to save $60 million in annual operating costs, the Air Force has since fiscal 2015 placed eight of its top-of-the-line C-5s in “backup aircraft inventory” status, even though they are needed to ferry troops and gear around the world, said Gen. Carlton Everhart, the four-star chief of Air Mobility Command.

D.C. Area Lawmakers to Colleagues: Leave Our Airport Alone
Warn against easing restrictions on long-haul flights into Reagan National Airport

Lawmakers from the D.C. area are concerned about sending more air traffic to Reagan National Airport in Arlington, Va. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lawmakers from in and around Washington are warning their congressional colleagues against changing local airport rules in a bid to make it easier for them to get back to their home states.

A group of 15 members of Congress, led by Democratic Sens. Mark Warner and Tim Kaine of Virginia and Benjamin L. Cardin and Chris Van Hollen of Maryland, along with Sen. Joe Manchin III, D-W.Va., do not want to see any easing of restrictions on long-haul flights from Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport — whose Arlington, Virginia, location is significantly closer to the Capitol building than either of the other major airports in the area.