SC-05

South Carolina GOP Runoff Heading for Recount
Ralph Norman leads Tommy Pope by 200 votes

Ralph Norman leads Tommy Pope by 200 votes in the Republican primary runoff for South Carolina’s 5th District. (Courtesy Ralph Norman for Congress Facebook page)

Updated May 17, 12:56 p.m. | The Republican primary runoff for South Carolina’s open 5th District seat is heading toward a recount.

With 100 percent of precincts reporting, former state Rep. Ralph Norman led state House Speaker Pro Tempore Tommy Pope, 50.3 to 49.7 percent, The Associated Press reported. The margin of just 200 votes is narrow enough to trigger an automatic recount, under state law.

Club for Growth Steps Into South Carolina GOP Primary
Group's super PAC debuts ads for Ralph Norman

Screenshot of a Club for Growth Action ad.

Ahead of Tuesday’s Republican primary runoff in South Carolina’s 5th District, the Club for Growth is endorsing former state Rep. Ralph Norman. Its affiliated super PAC will begin an ad campaign for him on Wednesday.

Norman faces off against Tommy Pope, the state House speaker pro tempore, in Tuesday’s GOP runoff. They both finished with 30 percent of the vote in the seven-candidate primary on May 2. Pope earned 118 more votes, according to The Associated Press

South Carolina GOP Race Heads to Runoff
Winner will face Democrat Archie Parnell in June special election

Republicans Tommy Pope, left, and Ralph Norman have advanced to the Republican primary runoff in the special election in South Carolina’s 5th District. (Photos courtesy Pope for Congress, Ralph Norman for Congress)

The race to fill the open seat in South Carolina’s 5th District is advancing to a primary runoff on the Republican side, with the eventual winner to face Democrat Archie Parnell in the June special election.

None of the seven Republicans earned more than 50 percent of the vote. The top two finishers in Tuesday’s GOP primary, Tommy Pope and Ralph Norman, will face each other in a May 16 runoff.

The Not-So-Special Elections
Of 5 upcoming contests, only Georgia race presents chance of a partisan flip

Karen Handel is hoping to succeed Tom Price in Georgia’s 6th District, but first, she faces an April 18 jungle primary with 17 other candidates. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Money is pouring into the suburbs north of Atlanta, the site of the first competitive congressional election of Donald Trump’s presidency.

Georgia’s 6th District, left vacant by the confirmation of Tom Price as Health and Human Services Secretary, is one of five special elections taking place across the country this spring, but the only one which offers much of a chance of a partisan flip.