Science

Republicans attack bill to block Minnesota wilderness mining
Mining in Boundary Waters, bill critics say, will help meet U.S. renewable energy needs

Gosar led Republican attacks on the bill to protect a Minnesota wilderness from mining. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Republicans on Wednesday ripped into a bill that would block mining in about 340 square miles of sprawling wilderness in northeast Minnesota, arguing the legislation would harm the expansion of renewable energy sources.

Leading the attack at a House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources hearing was Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Ariz. At times bordering on shouting, Gosar said failing to ramp up U.S. mining would leave the country beholden to foreign powers and lead to exploitation of child workers abroad.

Trump scales down once-grand infrastructure ambitions
Infrastructure gets passing mention on State of the Union address; Democrats' ambitious proposal not mentioned at all

Infrastructure is among the areas where Trump and congressional Democrats don’t see eye-to-eye. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump used 189 words of his 2018 State of the Union address to call for a $1.5 trillion investment in U.S. infrastructure.

On Tuesday night, the former real estate mogul signaled how much times have changed.

For Trump, a State of the Union with nothing to say
President’s hardcore base craves red-meat rhetoric. Will he give it to them?

Bill Clinton’s State of the Union address in 1999, made in the midst of his impeachment trial, exemplified his ability to compartmentalize, Shapiro writes, but that’s a skill Donald Trump doesn’t possess. (Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — In 1999, in the midst of his impeachment trial, Bill Clinton delivered a typically verbose State of the Union Address that ran for 78 minutes. Although it surprised many at the time, Clinton did not display a glimmer of concern about his predicament or allude to impeachment in any way.

Even more than most presidents, Clinton had a rare talent to compartmentalize. But the 1999 State of the Union was more than just an artful performance by a political master of denial. At the end of his speech, Clinton actually unveiled a new political argument that shaped the final two years of his presidency.

Five ways Democrats vying for president differ on climate and energy
Taxes, emergency powers and nuclear among the dividing lines

Protesters calling for more action by the government to combat climate change, gathered on the steps of the earlier this month.  (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Wrack your brain. What issue or bundle of issues do President Donald Trump and the Democratic presidential candidates see the most differently? Go on. It’s not easy.

But consider the twin topics of energy and the environment.

In Florida, Democrats aim to wrap Trump in his offshore drilling plan
Plan to open Florida’s coast to oil and gas drilling was put on hold, but it wasn’t killed

People hold hands on a beach in Pensacola, Fla., in June 2010 to protest offshore oil drilling. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images file photo)

After the Trump administration proposed opening Florida’s coastal waters to oil and gas drilling, even elected Republicans in the state sent a loud message to Washington: Stay away from our coasts.

The proposal was set aside by the White House, but not disposed of. And Democrats plan to keep voters in the battleground state reminded that the plan remains on a shelf at the Interior Department, ready to be put into effect in President Donald Trump’s second term if he is reelected.

Senators engage in ‘political ventriloquism’ during Trump trial questions
Impeachment Q&A used more to make points than clarify or obtain new information

California Sen. Kamala Harris arrives at the Capitol on Wednesday before the continuation of the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senators in President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial on Wednesday tried to score political points, press their argument or knock down the other side’s claims — they just couldn’t use their own voice to do so.

Instead, Republicans and Democrats wrote down questions on a white card, directed to either Trump’s legal team or the House managers, for presiding officer Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. to read aloud.

Impeachment trial, like much of Trump’s presidency, is unprecedented
Outcome could set new standards for presidential behavior and congressional oversight

Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. leaves the Capitol on Saturday after the Senate adjourned for the day in the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial, like many of his administration’s actions before it, has ventured into uncharted legal territory.

The trial lacks definitive answers on key issues, either from federal courts or the Senate itself, which has fed an undercurrent of uncertainty about what happens next in an institution usually steeped in precedents and traditions.

House of accommodations: Impeachment managers find ways to vote
Life goes on across Rotunda for prosecutors in Senate trial

House impeachment managers, from left, Sylvia R. Garcia, Val B. Demings, Jason Crow and Hakeem Jeffries are seen in the Capitol on Friday before the continuation of the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Sylvia R. Garcia has never missed a vote — not in her first term so far in the House and not in the six years she served in the Texas state Senate.

The freshman Democrat’s perfect attendance could’ve been in jeopardy this week since she is one of the seven House impeachment managers prosecuting the chamber’s case in the Senate trial of President Donald Trump. But fortunately for Garcia, House Democratic leaders are keeping the floor schedule flexible to ensure the managers can participate in votes.

How to pay for infrastructure? Ways and Means will count the ways
Raising long-stagnant fuel taxes is an option, but some Republicans have other ideas. Pay per mile?

DeFazio, who may release "general principles" of his infrastructure bill  as soon as Wednesday, says he prefers paying for it with a higher gas tax.  (File Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

When the House Ways and Means Committee meets Wednesday to take its first tentative steps to deciding how to pay for a federal infrastructure bill, its members will revive a perennial battle that could derail the whole debate: whether to raise a gas tax unchanged since 1993.

Since it was created in 1956, the Highway Trust Fund — paid for primarily by a federal gas tax — has largely funded highway construction and maintenance as well as transit.

How Maz Jobrani deals with hecklers
The ‘peaceful warrior’ is blissed out and rising above the f-bombs

Maz Jobrani will return to the Kennedy Center on Friday. (Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images)

Maz Jobrani knows politics. He has a degree in political science. He’s spoken out on immigration. He’s toured the country with a comedy troupe named after a speech by George W. Bush.

Heck, he even had a bit part on “The West Wing.”